Ch. 10 Dialogue and Response

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Post your dialogue response to this assignment on May 3 (by 11:59 PM) at the bottom of the assignment page.

After engaging in Chapter 10 resources covering Children films, YA and Coming of Age Films, the art of production design, the interview with film critic Sean O’Connell, and the Ten-Minute review concept  – address the following questions (your answers should be different from other students or enhanced with additional details).

 

  1. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?
  1. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.
  1. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?
  1. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

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37 Comments Add yours

  1. Caitlyn Hamrick says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?
    The most important element of film criticism techniques that I gained from the Sean O’Connell interview is that you should not let other critics influence your opinion on a film, just because other critics find a movie terrible you should not be afraid to let others know you love the film. When Sean said that he liked “Batman vs Superman Dawn of Justice”even though others did not agree, or when he expressed his love for the Spiderman films. This will help me in evaluating films because I often rely on other critics opinions on films when I am developing an opinion on a film, and so I think that this is a lesson that I really need to learn when it comes to evaluating films, do not let others influence your opinion.
    2. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.
    From the ten-minute review I gained a sense as to how to answer such a variety of questions in so few words. I always struggled to stay within the word count when reviewing a film because I am not ever sure exactly what the most important things to include are. The ten-minute review also helped grasp an idea on how to structure my reviews, and this will help me by allowing me to create a better structured, and more precise written review.
    3. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?
    Based on the videos, articles, and interviews on Production Design I found the fact that a production designer’s job is much like the job of the actor, except their job is to bring the world around the characters to life. I found this analogy very useful because when I decide on whether a movie was good or not my decision is ultimately influenced by the quality of the acting, if I felt a connection with the characters, and it is the same way with production design, can you believe the that the world around the characters are real, does the production design cause you to have to repeatedly remind yourself that the world on the screen is fiction. Thinking of production design in this way gives a better understanding and appreciation for reviewing films.
    4. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?
    Based on the videos and articles I found the fact that though many of the Disney movies are aimed primarily at child audiences they capture the hearts of adults as well. I found this the most interesting because when you come to think about it children’s films would have the greatest likeliness for success. When we are adults we forget most of the films we see, but the movies we see as a child when our brains are learning we grow a love for those movies, a love that we grow to keep on into adulthood, children movies go on for generations past the generation that they premiere to because we do not forget them and we show them to our children, and the cycle just continues to repeat itself. Coming of age films are also understandably successful with not just youth, but adults as well because we can all remember when we faced the trials and lessons that these movies are built on, and movies that audiences can relate to are going to raise great popularity amongst audience. I found this fact very interesting with the coming of age films.

    – Caitlyn Hamrick

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  2. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    The Most important thing I learned from Sean O’Connell was how he views sequels, and moves that are the same. I now know that some sequels are useless because the first film ended properly with no story to follow. I also started to think about reboots and how they are not really needed. I agree with Sean O’Connell about the Ghostbuster reboot. I think that the original was fine but the franchise wanted more money and I understand that. This can help me criticize sequels of films.

    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    I learned that it can be fairly easy to make a ten-minute film review if you follow the guidelines. I also learned that it is good to compare films based on their directors, actors, and film crew. I was also reminded to grade a film like a report card or a scale of 1 to 10.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    I learned that production designer are the ones responsible for looking for what the director sees in a script and making it happen. Production designers sometimes change locations to match their script or they built a location from scratch. I also learned that production designers have to watch the budget if they are making a set. This will help me understand why low budget movies have some bad sets, and why some sets could not look realistic as they should be.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    I did not think that there was a difference between family films and children films before this chapter. Pure children films are rated G while family films and be G or PG. I knew that Disney basically owns the children film industry but I never knew that they owned marvel. I found that family movies have some hidden humor to keep the adults interested in the film. I realized that all the coming of age films that I have viewed have had a crisis which is an aspect of this type of film. I found this realization to be interesting.
    -Dylan Mistretta

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Great feedback Dylan

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  3. katiecstone says:

    1. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    Sean O’Connell talked about how Marvel will start (and has started) to make films that not only fall into the superhero genre, but also encompass genres like sci-fi, coming-of-age, etc. Since this interview, this has happened with Spider-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Captain Marvel. All of these films have proved O’Connell’s belief that Marvel would need to change what superhero movies mean in order to keep up with our society. This was a good reminder for me to look for other genres/meanings in superhero films.

    2. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    The Ten-Minute Review forces you to give your immediate response to the film. While reviewing right after seeing the film is sometimes easier, parts of the film do not fully absorb in your brain (or at least mine) for a while. This could potentially cause you to forget mentioning a certain scene in your review. In minute six, one of the questions was – “were you draw to the characters? Or just the stars? Did it matter?” I think this is a very important question to answer. Frequently, I find myself liking a character merely because I like the actor, which should not be the case. This will remind me to focus on the actor’s ability to create a character that benefits the film.

    3. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    I found it interesting how different production designers are known for using specifc color tones in their designs. They usually do this in order to set different moods or perhaps, show the attitude of a certain character. This knowledge will help me with figuring out how the production design factors into the color theory that is seen in other aspects of the film. For example, if costumes are dark, yet the set is very light, do they complement each other in order to tell the story? Or are they just contrasting because the production designer had a poor understanding of the director’s intents?

    4. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    I did not know that Steve Jobs had bought Pixar back in 1986. It makes sense considering he created and owned Apple Computer, allowing him to use his computers to create animation for Pixar. I had never thought about the Toy Story series being Coming of Age stories. Throughout the three films, the main source of conflict comes from the toy’s anxieties about being abandoned or separated. Thinking about those films from that standpoint makes them seem so much darker, and although they are still kids’ films, the themes can appeal to adults.

    – Katherine Stone 4/29/19

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Katie -The color theory aspect connection to the production designer is a good one.

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  4. sugarymango says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    In this interview, I learned about sequels the most. In all of my life, I never have thought sequels had use (for the most part anyway.) Any book, movie, game, anything I’ve ever watched or played, the sequel was not as good as the first. Usually, if the certain movie is in a trilogy, the first and third are the better ones and the second is just used as a filler. I think that most movies could have sequels but are better off not having any because of how the story ends. It wraps everything up so what’s the point of having another movie? This can help if I’m watching a movie that has a sequel. I can look at the movie’s ending to see whether or not it should’ve had a second part to it.

    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    In the “10 minute review” I learned how to shorten my review but still have the vital information. This way, I can have what I am supposed to but it won’t take the reader 10 hours to read it. I think this will help when I have 1000 words and it should only be around 500. I wouldn’t have to worry about getting rid of important parts just to meet the word count.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    The most interesting thing I found was that production designers were responsible for the set and reading over things like a script. This is really cool in my opinion because this is where they can make everything seem real…or fake. If they do a good job, the audience will really feel like the setting is real, or that the characters are real. This can help me with reviewing by helping me see if the setting or characters are believable.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    Through the articles and videos, I found that many of the animated (or “children’s movies etc) can be aimed at adults while also being okay for children. Many people may want to relive their childhood, so that’s why many movies are made for both. Things that parents and their children can watch together. I didn’t know that there was a difference between Children films (and animation) and Family films. I understand after reading about it that children films are usually meant for small children while family films can be meant for a 8 to 15 year old can watch with their family.

    -Lucy HOlland

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy -Great feedback. The reliving of childhoods is a definite connection for adults watching children’s films. NTM

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  5. zachbaynard says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    I think one vitally imperative thing I learned from O’Connell was about how other critics should not affect your opinion. He basically states you should not hop on to the bandwagon (doing something because other people are doing it). For example, just because everyone loves Marvel Endgame does not mean you should love it as well. It is okay to love it as much as they do but you should not base your opinion on the movie because of other peoples reaction. It is also the same with movies people do not like, they should not affect your opinion. I think this information that O´Connell presented in the interview will help me big time when doing my film review for this week and future films. With his advice, I should give a film a 30/100 because everyone else hates it. I should examine it and decide for myself if it deserves that 30 or if I think it should be given a higher grade like an 80.

    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    I think one important thing that I learned was how to keep a review short but packed with information, which is what the whole 10 minute review is about. I learned how to add a ton of information in a short amount of time, which can really advance what we learned about making film reviews on youtube or podcast. I also find this strategy very neatly created because I felt that this 10 minute schedule is very organized but quick. I think that if I was to do a film review via youtube of podcast rather than wordpress, I think that this strategy would not only help take off time but also keep my review organized.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    One thing I learned about production design that really got my interest was how they tell people when the film is taking place and where it is taking place not by just explicitly stating it but instead giving us clues to make a prediction. This can make the film more enjoyable as it kind of gives the viewer a challenge in which they can try to predict when it takes place. It can also help the viewer pay attention to movie, as they need to keep their attention on the film in order to find the clues throughout the film that can help you predict the setting, which once again makes you enjoy the film more. I think that after reading the article and when I watch a film, I can maybe try to challenge myself and try to see where and when the film takes place and other events throughout the movie.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    I think one very interesting thing I learned about Children’s Films and YA films is the history behind Walt Disney studios. I have known who Mickey Mouse was, but I never knew that he was once known as Mortimer Mouse. I now wonder what if Walt Disney’s wife never told him to change the name to Mickey Mouse. I probably could not stand living in a world with the biggest animated children’s character known as Mortimer Mouse. Mickey Mouse just sounds much easier to say. I also learned why a lot of disney films might feature a black and white short animation of Mickey steering a boat, which came from ¨Steamboat Willie¨ back in the 20s.

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zach -Thanks for the feedback.I’m glad you benefitted from some of these.- NTMII

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  6. blakepow says:

    1.What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film? I feel like the facts about Georgia being a hotspot for filming instead of North Carolina is the most important lesson I gained from Sean O’Connell. This can help me with evaluating films by helping me be able to add facts about where certain movies were filmed.
    2.What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you. All three questions from the beginning minute were questions I had not been exposed to. In reviews I usually write or talk about these questions on my own or don’t talk about them at all. I usually don’t talk about these individual questions, I usually talk about the overall effect of the questions. This information will help me to provide and/or write a more entertaining and fun fact based review or evaluation.
    3.Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently? The thing that I find most interesting is that production designers have to understand what the directors want. They essentially have to be a mind reader and have to be able to interpret what the director wants. This will help me review films because now I don’t only have to say the director did a good job but I also have to say that the productions designer did a miraculous job in interpreting what the fictional world of the story would look like or how the director saw it. It gives me more to review a film about or on.
    4.Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why? I thought that it was interesting that animated films or skits were being made in 1928 by Walt Disney. I never that animations was being made so early, I thought animations was first made more recent like 1980s 1990s. It was cool to see how talented the Disney brothers were. I thought that it was interesting that there are so many types and parts of a YA film. These parts make the films so much more relatable and real. Like the concept of young love and grown ups in YA films.
    – Ethan Blake Powell

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  7. blakepow says:

    1.What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    I feel like the facts about Georgia being a hotspot for filming instead of North Carolina is the most important lesson I gained from Sean O’Connell. This can help me with evaluating films by helping me be able to add facts about where certain movies were filmed.

    2.What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    All three questions from the beginning minute were questions I had not been exposed to. In reviews I usually write or talk about these questions on my own or don’t talk about them at all. I usually don’t talk about these individual questions, I usually talk about the overall effect of the questions. This information will help me to provide and/or write a more entertaining and fun fact based review or evaluation.

    3.Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    The thing that I find most interesting is that production designers have to understand what the directors want. They essentially have to be a mind reader and have to be able to interpret what the director wants. This will help me review films because now I don’t only have to say the director did a good job but I also have to say that the productions designer did a miraculous job in interpreting what the fictional world of the story would look like or how the director saw it. It gives me more to review a film about or on.

    4.Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    I thought that it was interesting that animated films or skits were being made in 1928 by Walt Disney. I never that animations was being made so early, I thought animations was first made more recent like 1980s 1990s. It was cool to see how talented the Disney brothers were. I thought that it was interesting that there are so many types and parts of a YA film. These parts make the films so much more relatable and real. Like the concept of young love and grown ups in YA films.

    – Ethan Blake Powell

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  8. Cinema Scope says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?
    One interesting I found while listening to Sean O’Connell’s interview is how he views remakes of movies. He thinks that we shouldn’t necessarily make them because we can watch the same exact thing at home. I agree with him on this for the most part and him saying it makes my opinion on it stronger.
    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.
    What I gained from the Ten-Minute Review Concept was how to take out all of the unnecessary things out of the review. I am bad about going on and on about the same thing in the review or adding in unnecessary things into the interview. This will help me get straight to the point in my reviews and not dwindle on about the same thing for a whole paragraph when I have other things I need to talk about in my review.
    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?
    I found it interesting how much the set design plays into the actual film, I never look at the small little details that the set designers put in there but they really do play a huge part. This will help me appreciate and understand film differently because I will most likely not look over the little details and see how the set would look like without it there.
    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?
    What I found most interesting about YA films is that they are usually adapted from books, I know that films are usually adapted from books but not all the time. Most of the YA genre of films are usually adapted from a book take for example Harry Potter, Twilight, The Fault in our Stars, those are all YA films that were adapted from a book. I find it interesting that film makers make more YA film out of books than come up with an original idea.

    -Jessica Randolph

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks Jessica – Sometimes weeding out all the non-essential details in a film review can be challenging. Sometimes you have to walk away from your review and come back with fresh eyes. NTMII

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  9. mzod21 says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film? Remakes, remakes, remakes something tricky in my opinion especially if the original was on high standards. You either have to make it equal or better Sean mentions the topic of remakes of films and it is a repetitive thing to watch the same film with just some changes of course I will agree with him to a certain extent honestly i dont think remakes are that bad especially if they bring more fame to the orginal film with this I can lear certain elemts of film. If the remake was better if not worse than the original.
    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.
    Keeping up with the necessary and unnecessary in this course i’ve been trying to find that balance on what is important to put in your review and what is not. To not give too much nor too little I have to learn how to find the key points and aspects, give the readers something interesting and worth checking out.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?
    I like the sense that the setting into is not directly said it can be hitted at or be slowly introduced to the audience as it causes them to thing and wonder using their imaginations broadening their thinking entertain them slowly transporting them to land that they can see in their minds as they put the pieces of the puzzle together.
    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?
    the whole process of animations coming so early in the years with walt disney and the funny thing was that mortemer which is now thought of as mickeys no good cousin was actually the original name for mickey mouse and its amazing honestly that characters that I know and love now began as drawings on a sheet of paper way back then even my mother wasn’t thinking about being born at that time im just proud to see how the animations and legacy grew.

    -melanie degree

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Melanie – Finding the balance on what to share in a review can be a challenge. But, the more you write, the more you will become at ease. NTM

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  10. petertuong says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    I feel like an important thing he said was how to look at sequels and prequels, he said that movies will flop if people think that sequel or prequel tell the same story and make the same mistakes. So that can help me realize how a prequel or sequel failed, if it was different but not completely different from the first movie.

    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    What I gained from the ten minute review concept was that I should also focus more on the things outside of the movie, like the director(s). Minute one, minute three and, minute four all have questions and prompts that focus around the director. Beforehand in all of my reviews I never really took notice in who the director was for the movie I was watching. This new understanding will help me because knowing what director worked on the movie you are watching can already begin to give you insight before you even watch the movie.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    What I found most interesting was that in the article at the bottom of the Production Designer page, the article states that, “Many production designers are quoted as saying that if a viewer claims they did not notice the design, they know they have done a great job.”, this just goes to show how underrated they are in in some movies how very, very crucial they are to the setting and overall story. This will definitely help me appreciate a good movie that has a good story and story aspects such as time and place, and even help me determine time or place in movie that aren’t that good at those aspects.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    What I found most interesting is the different animation studios and how they have interacted with each other, such as the Pixar being bought by Disney and how before it was owned by Steve Jobs. Also information about other companies like Dreamworks and Pixar and their history and competition. These animation companies made movies of my childhood so it was interesting to learn about their history.
    -Peter Tuong

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Peter -Production design is an element of filmmaking that can have incredible impact on viewers’ perceptions and understandings and shouldn’t be overlooked. – NTMII

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  11. jmcmullens2 says:

    1) What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?
    After listening to the Sean O’Connel interview what I found important that could help me would be not to let others opinion affect yours. This would help me because when evaluating a movie I tend to take others opinion into consideration and form an overall general review from there instead of my review being directly from my opinion of the movie. Instead of letting what others tell me about the movie effect my opinion I can take what O’Connell was talking about when he was discussing not letting other critics have a par or influence when you critiquing a movie.
    2)What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.
    What I gained from the Ten- Minute Review concept would be that making your review right after the movie would be an easier way to do the review. It showed me how I could make a review and have all the information that I need in order for it to be a good review and make it short and easy. What served to me as a reminder would be that you do not need a long review in order for it to have the information that is needed to make it a good review. This would help me because I tend to forget certain parts of the movie that could contain great information because I have waited to do the review. Doing it right after would help because everything that happened is still fresh on my mind and I would be less likely to not include the parts of the movie that contained important information.
    3)Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?
    What I found interesting regarding the Production Designer would be that most of the time instead of using words they would use elements in the backdrop to hint clues about the person and that could simply be seen by how they design the home, and what colors they use within the space to convey that mood. This could help me because It can show more to the character besides just the script. This also would help while reviewing because it would express more to the overall mood and help when it comes to evaluating the characters and overall getting a deeper look at everything and how it ties the story together.
    4)Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?
    The most interest thing that I found about the history of children films would be that Disney was the first to put out the first full length animation movie. This to me was interesting because you would have thought that others would have been trying to tp what was already done with Mickey mouse from the start of the animated films. And Disney completely took over and every year since they have been releasing new movies. Speaking of Disney can we just say how excited I am for the Lion King to come out. Anyways besides that what I found interesting with YA films would be that most of the stories comes for novels and YA films goes hand and hand with Literature. I found this interesting because when you think of a YA film sometimes you don’t think about where the idea may have came from. Where some don’t like reading at all(me) they are actually watching basically the film of a book with some different twist on the overall plot,
    -Jada McMullens 05.03.19

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jada – Thanks for the feedback. NTMII

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  12. jscism5 says:

    1. One thing I found very interesting in the interview was when Oconell talked about going into the Batman Vs Superman film with low expectations. I feel could be very useful as a film critic. By going into a film with low or no expectations gives you a different view of the film. If you go into a film with high expectations and the film doesn’t live up to those expectations then you probably won’t give the movie a fair review. However if you go into the film without having expectations you judge the film off of what it actually is not what you hoped for it to be.
    2. One thing that I felt was a good reminder in the ten minute review is how important it is to create your own review. By doing the steps in the ten minute review you aren’t subject to other peoples opinions towards the film giving it your most honest and review. These steps are also done in such a timely fashion that you don’t have time to think long and hard about certain aspects of the film which I feel often gives your most honest opinion. If you take a long time to think about something you may begin to second guess yourself and convince yourself that parts of the film were either better or worse than your original opinion.
    3. After reading and hearing about the work that goes into production design I have a newfound respect for the people that do it. As an audience it’s something we don’t think much about but is another key part in film making. It gives us a background often times without and dialogue. Just from production design we are usually able to tell the general time and place that the film takes place.
    4. I found it very interesting how many films could fit into both family films and coming of age films. I would have never considered Toy Story a coming of age film or thought it fit into any other category other than a children’s film. But reading about these articles and seeing how they all seem to overlap I can think of few films that fit into just one of these genres/categories.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. jscism5 says:

      Josh Scism
      5/3/19

      Like

    2. noeltmanning says:

      Josh -Toy story franchise as a coming of age trilogy is spot on if you break it down and explore the story. NTMII

      Like

  13. 1. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    I feel that the most important element of film criticism techniques that I gained from Sean O’Connell interview was that the sequels of films are something that are almost the same from the first film but it is what the audience is waiting for and that we got to think about it when we watch the sequels of films. This is going to help me out with evaluating films because when I watch the sequel of a film I should compare it with the first and see if it is maybe to similar or if it was something that what the audience wanted and was waiting for.

    2. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    Something that I gained from the ten minute review post was that there is so many things that I can include in a film review to make it better. For example for every minute there was very easy questions that you can include in your post that sometimes I forget to include or don’t include in my blog posts. If I use these questions and advice given I bet that my reviews would be better reviews and I would be able to include more information towards the film that are useful for the review.

    3. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    In the videos there was one production designer, David Gropman, that mentioned that the main job is that his job is to project what the director wants to visually accomplish and he needs to understand what the director sees by reading the script. The reason I found it interesting was because seeing that these designers have to work hard to get the visual background to something the director wants to accomplish and then when the film comes out there are films that the production design is amazing that it makes you think that we do overlook their job. This will help me appreciate their work differently and when reviewing review their work and even compare their job to other production designers.

    4. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    Something that was interesting to me was that children films and family films are genres that are not the same both somewhat cross. The reason I say this is because I did not know that there was a difference between the two and know knowing that they are different it makes you think of what are the difference in each type of film and knowing what to see in the types of films makes it easier to compare and review the film.

    -Marleny Martinez

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Marleny Martinez – Production design is often overlooked, but so vital to the success of the film. NTMII

      Like

  14. 1. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    The most important element that I learned about in this interview is that instead of North Carolina being the main place where movies are made, it is Georgia. This can help me in evaluating films because it can help me understand where the movie is coming from and why it is set the way it is.

    2. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    What I gained from the ten minute review was how to get a general review of the movie and the director. This can help me get more accurate responses because you are thinking about it immediatly after the movie, and it can help me get a better review on more things in the movie. I can also allow me to quickly compare films that I like or dislike so I can get a general rating.

    3. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    What I found most interesting was how much the producer matters to the film. They create script possible, setting the scene, and building the set even from nothing are just some of the examples of what they do. It will help me understand and appreciate film differently because it can help me understand why the set could be low quality due to the script or limitations.

    4. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    What I found most interesting about children’s films history is that the concept of animated sequences representing “human movement” is actually over 5,200 years old. I thought that animation was a relatively new concept, but it really surprised me when I learned how old it was.
    -Dylan Swofford

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan, The concept of using drawings to tell stories has been a way to share histories and myths … and it still is, just not in cave drawings any longer. NTMII

      Like

  15. 1. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    I believe that one of the most important elements of film criticism gained by the NC film critic Sean O’Connell is that critics should not allow other reviews of a film impact their own review upon a film. Better yet, a film critic should not even view other’s criticism of a film they are planning on reviewing. This can impact evaluating a film by eliminating a large portion of bias and can allow critics to develop their own thoughts on a film, allowing for more novel reviews.

    2. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    From the “Ten-Minute Review” concept, I have gained multiple things. One major example that I have gained is that I am able to develop a first impression review grade of a film before examining the pros and cons of the film and providing a final review grade of the film. Also, because ten minutes is a limited amount of time, critics have to develop their thoughts quickly and this may allow for more honest thoughts of a film without examining your own review and eliminating some of your personality in the review because after all, it is the audience that determined the film’s success.

    3. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    Based off of the information, one of the most interesting things about a Production Designer’s job is that some Production Designers can truly impact the story, setting an intense atmosphere and providing reasoning for the actions in a film’s story. Production design can also show the Production Designer’s own style in designing a scene in a film. How production design can impact a film’s story could help me in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film by allowing me to understand some of the reasons behind the story’s character’s actions.

    4. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    Based on the information present, I found that many things were interesting about the interaction between Children’s films and YA films. One specific thing that I noted is that some film series can transition from a Children’s film to a coming of age film. This transition can allow the audience to grow up with the film series but limits the possibility that a younger audience can experience the film series with societal relevance. This is interesting because logically, this might not inspire too great of economical advantage but, this method can still reform to be a great film series.

    -Nathanael Leclercq

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Nathanael – Sean’s comments take us back to week one and “baggage.” NTMII

      Like

  16. Josh Rubino says:

    1. What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    What I learned that was most important from the interview with film critic Sean is his views on remake or sequel films. In his interview he tells you his thoughts on all types of movies that have either been remade or has put out a sequel for a movie. He compares the original movie to the sequel or remake and sets them apart like what is different about them and was has changed about those movies. Also he tells you about which parts were good in the remake or sequel and he also tells you what she should be taken out. This will help me because if I see a remade movie or a sequel I will compare it to the original and try to see if I can piece the original movie to the remake or sequel.

    2. What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    What has set a reminder to me in the Ten-Minute Review concept while I am reviewing is, could you predict events or plot twists before the writer revealed them? I think this will help me because if I am watching a movie and I know what will happen next then I will just spoil the movie for myself. Also I think if I can predict the events before the writer reveals them then why can other people reveal them themselves too. So I think if you can do that then the movie that you are watching may not be good because of how much it can spoil for you. In my opinion, I want to be fascinated or sitting at the edge of my seat because I don’t know what will happen next.

    3. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    What I found most interesting regarding Production Designers are that they have to not only read the script themselves and view in their way but also they have to view it in the directors eyes. In the interview the guy was talking about how he has to be like a mind reader because he has to have that connection with the director and see how that director is viewing things instead of how he views things. I think this will help me appreciate film because there is more to film then people think, I know all people see is the movie itself but I have been shown the different roles that people have in creating the movie and being part of it. I also have received background information on what Production Designers really have to do and the connections that they have to make to get their job done.

    4. Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    What I found most interesting was that no other studio has done more for the Children’s genre than Disney Studios. Disney did not only focus of TV shows, they also focused on amusement parks and merchandise that they sold to people. I think it’s fascinating how Disney has done so much for kid’s shows, growing up I remembered watching Disney Channel and loving it. Also I think studios like Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network got their ideas of putting out kid shows from Disney, in other words I think that Disney Studios inspired the other channels to show these types of shows.

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh, Mind reader is accurate for production designers. NTMII

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  17. Gluna0303 says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluating film?

    I believe that the one lesson that is one of the most important is the conservation of having your own opinions. In many cases when people have strong sided critics and we read about them, it can affect our whole concept of the movie and so we don’t go to see it with an open mind. I agree with that because it has happened to me many times before where people tell me that a movie is going to be horrible and so I go in expecting it to be just as badly as I heard it would be and surprise! it really was not. So, this taught me that in order to give an honest criticism and or evaluation to a movie, I cannot be looking at other peoples opinions because that damages the efficiency of my own personal critique
    .
    What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.

    WHat learned from the Ten-Minute review is that since you are limited to a minute per question, what you answer is what comes up from the top of your head, it isn’t premeditated therefore it would be what you honestly believed from the movie.

    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?

    I found interesting that every person that decided to go after or pursue such a career they consider their experience to be their passion for the theatre or film arts. Most of the interviews they say that as a child this was something they already knew they wanted and so that influenced them to go after such career
    .
    Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?

    The one thing that interested me the most was how animations have progressed so much throughout time. The example that was given to prove that was of Toy story because Pixar being just a graphics design company, after Steve Jobs bought it they made movies like Toy story that changed history.

    -Gabby Luna

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks for your feedback Gabby. Baggage (preconceived opinions) is still topics of discussions even 10 weeks beyond chapter 1. NTMII

      Like

  18. noeltmanning says:

    What do you feel is the most important element of film criticism techniques (or lessons) you gained from the Sean O’Connell interview? Why or how can that help you in evaluation.
    One of the most important things that I learned is that most movies are made in Georgia. This will help me to understand where the film was made and why that is.

    2.What did you gain from the Ten-Minute Review concept that you hadn’t been exposed to earlier? Or – what served as a reminder and enhanced your reviewing mindset? Explain how that will help you.
    What I learned from the Ten minute review was that there are also things that go on outside of the movie such as the directors that direct the movie. I don’t think that I ever payed attention to the director of the movie in the movies that I have watched in the past. But if I start doing this I could get some good information/insight before I start watching the movie.

    3.Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews regarding the Production Designer: what did you find the most interesting? How will that help you in understanding and appreciating (reviewing) film differently?
    One thing that I thought was interesting was how the Production Designer has to imagine how the director sees the scene in the movie. It’s almost as if they have to read the mind of the director and figure out what is going on inside his head.

    4.Based on the videos, articles and/or interviews – what did you find most interesting about history/interactions of Children’s films and YA (coming of age films)? Why?
    What I found interesting is the different animation studios and how they associate with each other. Like Disney and Pixar which are some of the biggest ones out there. They also made some of my childhood films and it was interesting to learn about some of Disney’s and Pixar’s history.
    Jahseim

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