(Ch. 9) Response Post due: April 26 before 11:59 pm.

Response Post due: April 26,  before 11:59 pm.

Engage in all chapter 9 materials:

Types of Horror Films

What Makes Horror?

What is a Mystery Film?

Blogging & Reviewing

Reviewing on Youtube, Podcasts, and Twitter

The Blumhouse Impact on Horror

Stephen King: The Grandmaster of Horror

Watch the first 16+ minutes of this interview with NC Film Critic Douglas Davidson (elementsofmaddness.com) and explore his approach to film criticism:

Address and FIVE of the following questions. Answering all six may gain you bonus points. In your response, you must should address a different idea than a previous class member, or add a different perspective or approach to each question. The key is making sure that you engage in the materials and share your own ideas:

  1. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?
  2. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
  3. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
  4. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
  5. Offer some insights from any of the following:

A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”

B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.

6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why? 

Screen Shot 2019-04-14 at 6.44.39 AM.png
https://movieweb.com/captain-marvel-movie-review/

31 Comments Add yours

  1. katiecstone says:

    1. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    Douglas Davidson says his degree in Philosophy has helped him to look beyond just what he sees when watching a film. It has pushed him to figure out not only what the story/characters are doing, but to figure out what they are trying to do, and if they are serving the message in the process. Even though I do not (and will probably never) have my degree in Philosophy, this is a tip I can use to positively impact the way I view and review films.

    2. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I am not a Horror girl, in fact, I try to stay as far away from the genre as possible (some of the horror trailers we have watched in this class have been a struggle…). However, when I do watch them, I usually gravitate towards Psychological Thrillers and Monster themes. I steer clear of Horror films containing demons and ghosts. Something about them seems more realistic and plausible to me, creating nightmares I would rather not have.

    3. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    I learned about the difference between an open and closed mystery, and how suspense is maintained as an important plot element. ‘The roots of a Horror’ supported my initial belief that dark places make for great mental/physical horror story locations. Fear of the unknown is usually related to the fear of darkness – for my reviews, this can help me to determine whether or not the fear of the unknown is related to the fear of darkness in a film.

    4. Offer some insights from any of the following:

    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”

    After watching “How to Make a Horror Film”, I learned that not many elements have to be added into a film in order to make it frightening/suspenseful. Suspenseful music alone can be added in order to get the audience on the edge of their seats.

    In J.J. Abrams’ Ted Talk, he discusses how mystery boxes can be found just about anywhere. He thinks of a blank page or an Apple computer as a magic box that is just waiting to be filled with ideas and creations. Stories are mystery boxes – filled with fundamental questions that continuously draw the audience into the story (Abrams’ discussing Star Wars’ mystery boxes is quite hilarious – start in at 8:45 to hear it).

    5. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    Placing reviews on platforms such as Twitter and YouTube makes it easier to market and access your reviews. Also, Twitter can allow for a quick snippet of your review, giving you the opportunity to reel the readers in. I think a big challenge of starting a film review blog is the lack of readers. You really have to get out there and market yourself, which is hard work; however, it is usually work worth doing.

    – Katherine Stone 4/19/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks Katherine Stone. Abrams’ discussing Star Wars’ mystery boxes … YES!

      Like

  2. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?
    One of the largest insights I gained from the film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films is when he was discussing how his study of philosophy helped him in reviewing. Douglas’s point that looking in the background and at the subtext is a very important aspect to focus on when he was reviewing the film. I think this will help me in reviewing future films because I sometimes struggle with looking beneath the surface of the film, and understanding what he universal message, or theme of the fim.
    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    Based on the readings, I think I would fall in the “Psychological (suspense) Thrillers”. I have little interest in horror films, but I have recently became interested in the show “Criminal Minds”, and that show involves a great amount of psychological mind games. I definitely try to avoid “Slasher films”. I am not a fan of gory, and brutal films, like slasher films. I remember being little and seeing “Saw” in the movie store, and just the sight of the box would terrify me.
    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    From reading about the roots of the horror and mystery genres I gathered insights that hope is a key detail in horror films. I never thought of hope in horror film, but when you think about the reason we sit through the two hours of suspenseful scares is because we have a small ray of hope for a happy ending, our brains are trained to search for a ray of happiness and hope amongst the fear and darkness. In mystery genres I was enhanced on the fact that the best mysteries are the ones where, the audience grows and learns with the protagonists, and the monster the is not revealed until later in the movie. I can use this to help me in future reviews because both of these things help reveal what the motivation is in the film. The motivation is the foundation of the film, without a good motivation there is not a good storyline. Understanding the greatness of the motivation in the film will help me decide on how great of a review to give a film.
    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
    The statement that some suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category is true because mystery is almost always about catching the monster that is raging havoc amongst the savilians, and then the suspense builds up to the revealing of the monster. A monster that is going to terrify us with what will most likely be engaging in a horrific killing. Horror is all about driving fear into the audience, and boosting their adrenaline. Mystery/Suspense will almost always lead up to horror. The movie “Jaws” would be an example of a mystery/thriller film that crosses into the horror spectrum, because their suspenseful pursuit for the shark ends with the terrifying killing of Quint, and an attack on the Orca. This suspense ultimately built up to a monster that struck fear in our hearts, and raised our blood pressure. The film left us with a fear of water within the audience, a fear that is still there 40 years later.
    Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.
    From the video segment on “How to Make a Horror Film” I gathered that when you create a horror movie you should always start with some place that the characters would trust, and then taken happiness and trustworthiness of the place away from it, the video also reinforced the concept that much like other films, all horror genres follow the same basic structure, with little tweaks within them to give the film its individuality from other horror films. The video segment “Frame by Frame: Horror Films” gave me the insight that the reason that horror films are so popular among the population is because they provide an experience that we can not get anywhere else. In horror we are able to be given that thrilling feeling, that makes us jump in our seats, but s=we still remain safe because there remains a distance between the screen and ourselves.
    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?
    The most challenging aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for me is the fact that I, and my parents are not comfortable with me posting Youtube videos, Podcast, and Twitter Blogging because of the privacy aspect of it. The most beneficial thing about reviewing in that manner is that it is much easier to speak your thoughts than to write them, when writing it can be a struggle to figure out the proper wording, and proper grammar as well. When speaking things seem to flow more fluently than they seem to do when trying to write my feelings and point of view on a specific film.
    Caitlyn Hamrick

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Caitlyn Hamrick – Thanks for your detailed feedback and thought. NTMII

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  3. 1. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films? How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    Film creators must consider the audience that the film is aimed at. “Quest for Peace” is aimed at a younger audience. “Superman 3” contained content that was intended for an older audience. The woman absorbed by the machinery scares younger viewers. Silly gags with a lower sense of humor target younger audiences and children. While magic and mysticism can be targeted to children and adults, it pushes a PG-13 MPAA rating. Films that are considered great films are due to their story storyline. These films start and end with the scripts. If there is not a solid story, then the film will not hold up. Douglas Davidson had great reviews. He included the tone and the mood of the films in which he critiqued. This made his reviews stand out and have a bigger impact. This made me realize that I have not included these on my film reviews. I plan to incorporate the mood and tone in my future reviews.

    2. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I personally do not like any horror movies at all. I typically stay far, far away from ghoul, ghost, and unexplained phenomenon category. When I was on an eighth-grade trip the school voted on a movie, and the choice was “A Quiet Place”. Due to my fear of extraterrestrial life, I did not sleep for weeks. I thought something was going to come out of nowhere and get me if I spoke. I have not viewed a horror film since.

    3. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    From mystery genres, I learned that there are two types of mystery films; open mystery and closed mystery (also known as a whodunit). The closed mystery hides the identity of the perpetrator until late in the story. The open mystery reveals the perpetrator early in the story.
    The most important aspect from the roots of horror for me is how there has to be hope in the characters to make the protagonist and audience believe there is a way out. Without hope, there is no motivation to leave the scary place, other than fear alone.

    4. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    Psychological (suspense) thrillers fall into the category of horror films. Most films build suspense until they reach the climax. Take the Maze runner into consideration. That film builds a lot of suspense as Thomas runs through the maze, but if you have seen the film you know he gets stuck in the maze for only one night. What happens during that scene, the griever chasing Thomas, could almost be considered a horror. I feel that filmmakers cross the genre to make the films more interesting while keeping you hooked throughout the film.

    5. Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J.
    A horror movie begins with an ordinary place that is not happy. A main character with a friend that does not want to be anywhere near that place is added along with a friend who does not believe in ghosts. The characters need a bad reason to enter the place. One character serves as a warning. Now let’s add the music and let the sound effects begin. As the story continues, things begin to move and characters disappear. Only the lead actor makes it out and the film ends with a cliffhanger.

    Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    You don’t need modern technology to make a good movie. You begin with a teaser as the big question. (What draws the viewer in?) A good film represents possibility, hope, and potential. Mystery can be used as a catalyst for imagination. Holding information from the viewers is more engaging. The blank pages of a script are like a mystery box. “What are you going to write that is worthy of me.”

    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    The most beneficial thing about making a podcast and reviews is being able to make money if you have the opportunity. If you can make money off of watching a movie that is a win-win situation, not only do you get to see a film but you can also make money from writing a review. The most challenging aspect of writing reviews is that writing them can be very time-consuming. It takes a longer amount of time to write a quality review. I am a very busy person in general and sometimes it is hard for me to find the time to write a good film review.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      DYLAN MISTRETTA – Great and thoughtful feedback. “Hope” standing alongside horror … the reason to watch. -NTMII

      Like

  4. sugarymango says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    I think the greatest thing I gained from Douglas Davidson was how he used philosophy in reviewing and critiquing. I think that if you learn how to look in more than one way, or how to think in more than one way, you can learn more about why the characters might do things, or why a person acted this way. It can help in looking at how certain on-screen things can affect the audience and why. I think thinking this way could help me explain things better, and be able to understand different point of views than my own.

    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I enjoy horror, for the most part. Games, books, movies you name it! I’ll probably love it. I don’t usually watch “Monster” horror, or witches and curses for the most part, although I will sometimes and mainly it will be the old ones. (1950s to 1960s) I love Psychological thrillers and Slasher films. Those I could be watching (or playing) and I’ll get real into it and all of the sudden, something will happen and I’ll probably scream and jump. But the feeling it gives is cool. (Until it’s over and I’m afraid to walk down the hallway by myself) I don’t mind the witch or curse movies, I just don’t particularly watch those, not that I don’t like it, I just don’t give it thought. Personally, I think Asian horror movies are my favorite. I don’t dislike the others, it’s just my personal opinion. Asian urban legends are just overall pretty creepy, like the one about the woman with a mask on approaching people at night asking if they think she’s pretty. If they say no, she’ll kill you with scissors, if you say yes she’ll remove the mask revealing a mutilated mouth and ask again. If you say no, you get cut in half, if you say yes, she’ll cut your mouth like hers.

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    I learned that horror can torture the mind, heart, and gut. For example, I played a horror game last night and this guy was chasing my character so I run up the steps to the 4th floor and try to open the door. Of course it’s locked. So I run back down the stairs frantically because I can’t see him and as I get to level 2 stairs I turn to go down…AND HE IS RIGHT THERE CHASING ME. I scream and end up dying on the game. My head is pounding and so is my heart, so to prevent a headache I turn off the game. This shows me that people have different tolerance levels. On games or movies (horror) I can’t stand the character being chased and hiding but you don’t know if it is safe or not. In another game (that is my favorite) the creator designed the first building to evoke a feeling of terror, even though you’re safe. You have places to hide, but you don’t feel safe. I can’t play the game for long because the antagonist will chase you if you make too much noise and it tears up my nerves. The fact that filmmakers and gamemakers can create certain effects that will scare almost everyone shows that they look at people’s buildup. This can be helpful in analyzing the effects someone will put into a film.

    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    I definitely agree with the statement. I feel like suspense is used in just about any movie but if the whole movie is suspenseful, it could fall into the horror category, the one that makes you think and messes with your mind. I also think mystery could be horror in some ways. If it’s a movie about a serial killer and who could it possibly be??? (Or just regular murder.)The I say it could cross into Slasher and psychological. Like “Psycho.” That movie was definitely a cross between mystery and horror. You didn’t even know the killer until the end, and throughout the story characters where dying, suspense was being used.

    Offer some insights from any of the following: A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,” B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.

    I learned from the “How to make a horror film” video about the importance of characters, sound effects, and having a happy place and sucking the happy out of it. I see all of that in each game or movie I watch/play. There is an example of a game I have played called “White Day”. This game had all of the qualities mentioned. There was a main character going into a usually safe school, there he finds more characters who either want to get out of there or is trying to find something too. The use of sound effects helps with jumpscares and suspense, whenever I play that is when I freak out the most. There are also random things moving, sudden phones ringing, and it is dark and scary. You have ghost appearing and danger everywhere. The video actually did a really great job at taking what you use for horror movies and presenting it out.

    After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    I think the most beneficial thing about using YouTube or Twitter is the how simple it is at writing the review on there, or doing audio. At first it would be difficult because you have to make it short and sweet but this, in the end, will teach you how to write better reviews that are also shorter. A challenging thing would be getting started. You are at a lack of views, followers, etc, so it would be hard getting yourself to be well known and able to put yourself out there. You’d have to work extremely hard, which is exhausting for the most part.

    ~Lucy Holland~

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy -Interesting feedback relating to “horror” games you’ve played and the connections here. NTMII

      Like

  5. Cinema Scope says:

    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    I feel like I watch more ghouls, ghosts, spirits and unexplained phenomenon, slaser, and psychological thrillers the most out of the other categories of horror films. When I am picking a horror movie to watch it is always between these three genres, I feel like I watch these the most because they are more fun for me personally to watch, with the ghouls, ghosts, sprits, and unexplained phenomenons I think that I like those because of how the producers portray the evil, how they haunt you. For slasher films I love the suspense and the adrenaline I get while watching them. I know when the music plays that the killer is going to come out and kill someone, so with thrillers it is just for the suspense. For psychological thrillers I love them because it makes me think, and I am paying closer attention to the movie. Psychological thrillers aren’t really scary at least not to me it is more for the mystery and the thinking that I like to watch this sub-genre. The horror films that I usually stay away from are the monsters and the witches and curse. I feel like these movies aren’t as good as movies from the other sub-genres, I personally don’t like the movies with the horror monsters such as, dracula, frankenstein, werewolves, and etc. They just don’t appeal to me as much, going to witches and curses I honestly don’t like these types of horror movies. The witches and curses horror movies always seem so cheesy and fake, they don’t don’t even seem like they could be real or could happen. I just honestly don’t like these two sub-genres.
    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    What I gained from reading those articles was that horror movies used to be very different back then. Now it is really crazy how the horror films are now, we use all sorts of CGI and special effects and use concepts that people back then wouldn’t even think of using. The horror films back then wasn’t as bloody and gory as it is now it was more suspenseful and more about the actual horror character than what they were doing.
    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
    I think that some suspense/mystery films could possibly cross into the horror category because of the suspense in the film. In the movie they use a surprising factor and scares the audience or they have very creepy and eerie scenes. Take for example the movie Seven, it could possibly cross into the horror category in some ways. One reason is the deaths, they look like they did come out of a horror movie and could make people very squeamish, just like a horror movie does. Another example from the movie Seven is when they are chasing the killer or when they take the killer out into the middle of nowhere. My heart rate accelerated and I was a bit scared, I was nervous to what the killer might do or if her might pop up out of nowhere and kill one of the characters.
    Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,” B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.
    I thought J.J. Abrams Ted Talk was really good, I liked how he was really free with what he said. I liked his stories it really added to his speech about mystery. I was really interested in his speech. I read the article on Stephen King, I absolutely love his works and I would have been surprised if he wasn’t mentioned in this chapter. Stephen King is one of the kings of horror to me I love his books and I love the film adaptations to them also. I am always surprised by what he does. When I read this article I was very interested in his history and I love that he uses parts of his own life in his books such as having writers in his books. I was also amazed at how many works he has written, I didn’t know he had so many, he has over fifty works, that amazing.
    After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    I feel like the most beneficial for me is to read others reviews and to write a lot of reviews to build up my portfolio. Because reading others reviews will help me improve, also writing more reviews will help me improve. The most challenging aspect is making a youtube movie review account, obviously you don’t have to have a youtube account for movie reviews but it really helps. I am extremely shy and it would be very challenging for me to have a youtube account, even if I am not seeing the people in person.

    -Jessica Randolph

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jessica – SEVEN – Yes!

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  6. jmcmullens2 says:

    2) Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    I do not watch horror movies like that. They are not my favorite at all. But if there was a movie that was horror and caught my attention i would most likely would watch a Ghouls, ghosts, spirits and unexplained phenomenon. I find paranormal activity things interesting especially when it is in a movie.
    3) What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    What I gained from reading about the history of horror would be that it can affect the body. The tolerance that we have for scare varies from person to person. Me personally I jump at the things that don’t even be scary it can just be a change in music while i’m not really paying full attention.This could benefit my review because I should not judge it based on how scary it is because everyone has their own scare tolerance. What might be scary may not be scary to others with a higher pain tolerance.
    4) Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
    Some movies could be considered a mystery movie and a horror movie at the same time because that have both aspects of the movie. An example of a movie that has both would be A Quiet Place. This movie has the mystery aspect when it comes to the creature in general. No one knows what it is or how it came about and the dad we see is trying to figure that out through the story and also how to get him to go away. While the movie is also a horror because the characters comes across tragedy and fear. The story question also related to being able to overcome this creature.
    5)Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    A horror movie is a movie where things seems to be off from the beginning and the characters play a part in that and so does sound effects and music . There is the character that doesn’t want to be there in the first place and the town as a whole there is just a bad vibe no one is really excited to be there. The music and sound effects add to this by enhancing what is going on. The talso with J.J Abrams i learned that anything could be a mystery he used Apple products for an example. I learned that that a mystery box is a movie story basically. I have never heard of the term but, after the ted talk it makes sense why a story would be a mystery box that is waiting to be created.
    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?
    The most beneficial aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for me would be that I am able to share my opinion about the movie to a wider group of people and not just people i know. This would be a benefit because if you are making money off of it then you are gaining money by having people listen or watch your reviews. Twitter on the other way there is many steps you have to take in order to make money off of there so there. Do if you were doing it off there it would be a benefit because simply you have a voice to a larger group like I said previously. The most challenging however is getting the word spread I feel like because most people do not just look up film reviews on social media. It’s the process of getting started and being able to get people to listen, read or watch them.
    -Jada McMUllens 04-25-19

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jada -A Quite Place -good examples. NTMII

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  7. zachbaynard says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?
    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    One major take away from Douglas Davidson was how he used philosophy in his reviews. I think that looking at a movie in a different perspective can really help when trying to understand the film and understanding why that particular scene took place or why that character did what they just did. Many people will interpret a film differently, so if you know why one group interprets a film one way and why another group interprets a film the other, you can make a better film review with both interpretations. I think for me on the horror spectrum I often find myself enjoying psychological thrillers. Although horror is my least favorite genre, I still am often entertained by psychological thrillers. I often find myself on youtube intending to watch try not to laugh challenges but then want to watch documentaries on different serial killers like Ted Bundy or Jack the Ripper. I guess this also implies to slasher films as well. The one I really do not like are monster films. I really do not like being given the question ¨What if this event happened in real life¨. Take a zombie apocalypse movie for example. The question would typically be ¨What would you do in a zombie apocalypse?¨. Often times despite zombies not being real, I am often scared by the questions and end up worrying my brain will get ate.

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    I think what really enhanced my knowledge from the readings were the type of horror genres. You have the monsters in one genre and then serial killers and murder on the other. This really interested me because all my life, I thought all horror movies were the same, but I was wrong. I guess that just realizing the documentaries on serial killers I find myself watching, I have never noticed those are horrors when it talks about them taking someone’s life. I think that this will enhance my reviewing skills mainly because of the lack of baggage I have in my mind.

    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    The mystery genre can overlap into the horror genre. One common mystery plot is that a detective tries to find out who committed that crime, with the crime typically being murder. They have to look at the blood of the victim, the weapon the killer used, and the reason behind the murder. One example of a mystery overlapping into a horror would be Sherlock Holmes because it involves Holmes investigating a crime with some creepy evidence supporting that case.

    Offer some insights from any of the articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.

    One major insight I found out was just how King went under the name ¨Richard Bachman¨. I think that going under this name was a huge success because he wanted readers to buy all of his books but readers would not buy more than one book from him a year. So he used a different name and was able to make a huge success off of it.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    The most beneficial thing about placing reviews on these platforms are the creativity and special effects you can add. If you decide to use youtube for film reviewing, you can edit the video and make the video more professional. If you wish to use blogging, you can add different fonts and pictures in order to get your point across. However, it does come with disadvantages. One is at the start of creating a film review with a platform. One difficulty is just getting set up. It can be challenging uploading a video to youtube or any other platform. Youtube would probably be the toughest, considering you need at least a decent quality camera in order to make a good video since nobody likes a video recorded with a potato. Also you need to hook the camera up to your computer and download the video. Then the tricky part is editing. When you edit a video, it give the video more of a professional vibe to it and makes it more interesting. Without editing, it can be boring.

    -Zach Baynard

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zach -We should all look for ways to protect our brains from Zombies.

      Like

  8. jscism5 says:

    1. The thing that stuck with me most from the interview was when he talked about philosophy helping him in his review of films. He explained that in philosophy you have to learn to think and this helped him grow as a critic because he was able to see things going on in the background. During this course I have learned the importance of noticing things that aren’t always able to be seen and that attention isn’t always drawn to. Things that still have immense importance and can tell you a lot about the film but are very easy to miss. I think this is the most important thing I’ve learned from this course and hearing him say that shows how important it can be as a film reviewer.
    2. I am not a huge fan of horror movies but if I had to pick one category that I’m most drawn to I would have to say Ghouls, Ghosts, spirits, and unexplained phenomenons. I feel like these are the most entertaining horror films and in my experience they seem to have the best plot as well. My least favorite genre would be Demons and Demon possession. Horror movies haven’t ever been scary to me but the thought of demon possession is very unsettling and is something I’d like to avoid thinking about or seeing.
    3. One thing I found interesting about the roots of horror is how important hope is in a horror film. As an audience you always have hope that the victims will find a way to overcome whatever monster they’re facing in the film. I think this could be very helpful in reviewing, if you pay attention to how much hope you have during the movie and the way it changes could give a very interesting style of review.
    4. It’s fairly easy to see the correlation between the two genres, both are usually very dark and suspenseful for one. Also in horror films the monster isn’t always an alien or vampire it can be a psychopathic human. One film that I feel is a good example of this would be silence of the lambs. The film isn’t only about Hannibal Lecter but also about the people trying to capture him.
    6. Placing your reviews on social media platforms can be very beneficial as a aspiring film reviewer. It gives you an audience some of whom may even give feedback on your work. For another it could be seen by someone who works in that field and would like to see more of your work possibly leading to a job. The most challenging part of this for me would be having my opinions out there for the world to see, typically I am not a very outspoken person who feels the need to have their opinion known by everyone. I have never been a fan of public speaking and presentations. While this is different from giving a public presentation it still isn’t something I’m very comfortable with.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    The thing I gained the most from him was how he used philosophy in reviewing films. It help him focus on many aspects of the film that a normal person or a new film critic might not see I think that this is important because it helped him piece together what was going on in the film and how every detail played a role in the impact of the film. This helped me and still can, by giving me some insight that everything around the main parts of the film are important too.

    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I really hate horror film and I stay as far away as I can from them. Basically all of my childhood was spent watching horror films because my family loves them and I would stay up for many nights afraid of going to sleep. I think there is only one or two horror movies that I like to watch, but I will still stay up all night from it. I’d like to stay far away from all types of horror film, because I’ve probably already seen at least one horror film in any category that you can think of and I get scared easily because of them.

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    From Mystery genres, I learned about open mystery and closed mystery. Closed mystery hides the perpetrator’s identity until late in the film, which adds to the suspense in the story. Open mystery reveals the identity of the perpetrator, which doesn’t really add onto suspense, but we may see some suspense throughout the movie while the protagonist is finding clues that leads them to the perpetrator. From the roots of the horror, I learned that hope is a key detail in a horror movie. I always knew that the protagonist being chased had hope of escaping, but I never really thought of hope as being important in a horror film.

    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    It is true because in suspense/mystery films it can give you a “don’t open that door” or “don’t go in there” type of feeling because you know what’s going to happen if they do open that door and it would make it a suspenseful or a mystery film because you don’t know how they will meet in the first place, but the predator on the other side of the door could be a killer which would make it have a horror aspect to the film,

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    Placing review on twitter and youtube are easier ways to entertain your viewers or audience and capture their interests, plus it is a slightly more efficient way to do a review. The most challenging aspect is getting people to read or watch you reviews, because some people may not know the movie your reviewing, plus if you start out as a new film critic, it may be hard to catch their at first.

    – Rileah Graham

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rileah -Open and Closed Mystery – a good piece to remember. NTMII

      Like

  10. petertuong says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?
    In the interview, he said that he wasn’t a big fan of horror. He also said that when he does review horror he doesn’t let his baggage affect his review, so this can help me because of my baggage on movie genres like horror or romance. Mr. Davidon also said that to not let his baggage affect him he focuses more on the story aspects instead of the technical things that will freak him out.
    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    Looking at the categories and subgenres of horror I can say that I still don’t like horror movies all that much, but if I had to choose a favorite it would have to be psychological thrillers because I like movies that focus on the human mind itself and how it can be manipulated. I usually try to stay away from all horror but I can try to tolerate the psychological horror.
    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    The insight I gained from the roots of horror was that the scary parts are most of the time up to the audience and viewer, the horror is inside us and it is making us scared because we all have fears, I guess that this can be implied for other genres as well such as comedy(what you find funny) or action(what you find cool and interesting), so when I review I can use this to see why I find something funny while others did as well or didn’t.
    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
    An example of both a mystery/suspense and horror movie and be Jordan Peele’s Get Out, It has the suspense and mystery because we are coming in with the knowledge of the main character and he has to find things out over time. But it is also a horror because of fear and tragedy, such as the threat to the main characters life and the lives of others.
    Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    From “How to Make a Horror Film”, it really shows how easy it can be sometimes in order to make things creepy and suspenseful, it also shows how the manipulation of some of the senses can really affect your mood/tone. In the video they took a bright scene and made it look more serious and sinister by changing the music/noise and lighting to a more darker tone and feel.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jordan Peele’s Get Out, – Great example Peter

      Like

  11. 1. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?
    Something that I gained from his approach with reviewing films was that when watching a film we have to also see what is in the background of the film the subtext not what someone is just seeing we have to get not only “the sense of what they are doing but what they are trying to do and how well it serves the message”. This can help me with my film reviewing because when I watch films that I am going to review I need to look at the message of the film and the background in the film instead of looking at the film with one perspective that is restricting my view of the film which I shouldn’t do.

    2. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    I am not drawn to horror films because I do not watch horror films and I do not enjoy them. The reason is because these types of films have things that I do not approve of for example they include spiritism, monsters, demojs, and psychopaths which is something that I do not like and are not good to watch. I do not watch horror films at all.

    3. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    After reading the blog posts I learned something new about the roots of horror genres was that there must be hope alongside the film even if it meant that it was a little hope for the audience. I didn’t know that in every film there was hope on the side of the film because in some horror films you have the feeling and know that some of the characters are destined to die and won’t make it in the film so the audience doesn’t really have hope for the film. This will benefit me in reviewing films by allowing the reader of the reviews that horror films can have hope of the character of the horror film.

    4. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
    Mystery films sometimes do cross into the horror category for example the film “Get Out” it was a film of both mystery and horror because in the film the Chris was uncovering the truth of what was going on in the house and at the same time there was characteristics of horror films in the film for example there was crazy people in the film that where doing things to African-American people which falls into the section of horror “psychological (suspense) thrillers”.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?
    The most beneficial aspect of review-related thoughts on these platforms are that when we write a review we may be given a number of words that we need to write or can not pass or maybe a specific time that we can talk about a movie. The reason it is most beneficial to reviewing is because when we write a review there is a specific word range that is given to us that we can only write so we have to always think about this when we are writing our reviews. Thinking about this will help us write better reviews because we got to only include the necessary things of the review and that will make it a better one then just writing down things that are really something not necessary in the review.

    -Marleny Martinez

    Liked by 1 person

  12. blakepow says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing? I was going to do this question for extra credit but the link was not working.
    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why? I Like all of the horror genres that were in the readings this week. The horror genre that I like the most though is slasher films. I like slasher films the most because slasher films are not that scary to me and they usually have good plots and kills. A close second would be paranormal or unexplained phenomenon. I am drawn to slasher films and paranormal films because I am interested in the unexplained and the gory. I would say that I stay away from psychological thrillers because I have not seen a single a single movie that was an example for it.
    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing? I gained the insight that the best horror comes from within you. I was aware that horror came from within you but I did not know that it was the best kind of within. I guess it is the best because it is the most pure kind of horror. This will benefit me in reviewing horror films to possibly find out if the horror is good enough to have come from within.
    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres? I would say that some people consider some mystery films horror because they induce so much suspense on the mind that it make them scared of what is going to happen next. A film, that I have seen, that would cross into the mystery/horror film category would be “IT”. “IT” would be in this category because one of the main characters is trying to figure out what happened to his brother throughout the movie. The other characters are trying to figure out what is going on with them and the clown. It is also scary because there is a scary paranormal clown chasing after all of the frightened characters.
    Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.
    It was cool to learn that Stephen King’s sons are trying to follow in their father’s footsteps. It was also cool to learn that they are being successful at it. I thought it was interesting and cool how many of Stephen King’s books have been turned into movies or TV shows. It is hard for me to imagine how one person could write 100 books and those books be so successful that movies and TV shows are made out of almost all of them. A question I would like to ask would be “Does it ever get boring or tiring?”. Stephen King had to have written some poor quality books or a lot based on how many good ones he has written.
    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why? One thing I could think of that would be challenging aspect on reviewing on these platforms is maybe a whole lot of people don’t have access to this platform or this platform. It also might be hard to get your full opinion or idea across clearly on some platforms. Something beneficial that I could think of about these platforms is that most of them are for free so lots of people can have access to them.

    – Ethan Blake Powell

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      It -Great examples. I’m sorry the Davidson link wasn’t working for you. I had several people respond to the video. Ethan

      Like

  13. Gluna0303 says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    when watching his interview one of the greatest points that I learned about was how he is able to review horror movies for his film criticism although he had a condition that was traumatizing in result of watching scary movies. He learned to leave his baggage behind and I feel that following that example could help when criticizing other films, to not let my baggage get in the way.

    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I believe that I follow under thrillers and that is one that I also love to watch. I feel like it is because I want to be able to watch things that give me the rush that a scarry movie does but not enough to give me nightmares for weeks

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    I feel that reading and finding the roots of horror movie helped me to realize the purpose of uch films. Before I really disliked them especially the ones that appeared to be demonistic but I realize that there are some that don’t include such things.

    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    I feel that one movie that I watched not too long ago that would fall under the suspense and thriller category is a Quiet Place. I felt that this crosses over to horror a bit because of the gore that goes on and how it keeps you at the edge of your seats because of the creepy monsters.

    Offer some insights from any of the following:

    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.

    The basic insights of these two things was how they both were able to make film productions that became some of the favorite all time horror movies. Jason Blum was one to create The Purge, Get out, Split and such halloween movies but also in the video I saw that Get Out did not instantly become a hit so it became more of a local type horror movie rather that national. ALos Stephen King was partly famous for his side of paranormal activity movies and horror which are considered to be some of the best.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    I believe that the true thing about using such means for blogging and reviewing does come with its perks. First of all you are more likely to gain more publicity to your reviews but a downside is that your have more limitations when it comes to wording or the time it takes to summarize and criticize a film. I feel that the reason these two can be a problem is because in most cases you don’t get as much across as you would prefer.

    -Gabby Luna

    Liked by 1 person

  14. 1) What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    He says that when he makes films that he pays attention and determines what age group of people should like or enjoy this movie. Douglas Davidson has some great reviews. He stated that he doesn’t let his film baggage get in the way of his review. He also says that he is not the biggest fan of horror movies.

    2) Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I do not like horror movies at all because when something bad happens in the movie it stays with me for weeks at a time and having a gruesome image in ur head for that long is torture. I take extra special precautions to avoid horror films.

    3) What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    I learned that for the most part the scary parts of movies are up to the audience and how they interpret them. At the end of the day everyone has a fear. This will help me to get more comfortable with horror films.

    4) Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    An example of this would be Get Out. I searched up what the film was about and at the start of the film everything was normal and not suspicious at all but towards the end things started to get serious. The movie itself has suspense and mystery These are perfect elements to create a good horror film. The film also fills you in slowly and as you watch you get closer and closer into the main event.

    5) Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse andStephen King.

    What I got from this was that it doesn’t take alot to make a movie scary/suspenseful. All they need to do is get into your head by adding jump scares and creepy music t make the hairs on the back of your neck stand up.But by adding music to a unsafe/scary environment can have a massive effect on the film.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    The best thing about making a podcast and doing reviews is getting money from it. If you had the opportunity to make money from a movie just by watching it and doing a review that’s good because you get paid and you get to watch a movie. But the most challenging thing would be writing the reviews they have to have time put into them so they can be as good as possible.

    Jahseim Merritt

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  15. Josh Rubino says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    Douglas Davidson wrote movie reviews to keep his writing skills sharp and he said that helped his brain keep active on being able to do those reviews. I think this will help me because if you always work on your writing I think you will able to make better reviews and be able to review films with in depth meaning because you have that skill of writing. Also his philosophy degree helped him because he said that in makes him look more for the meaning and not what he just sees. In other words he is saying he is looking more in depth at the movie because of his philosophy degree.

    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    Physiological Thrillers because these are much closer to reality and just thinking about how these horror films can really happen puts a chilling feeling in my bones. Usually I’m not the type of person to watch horror but when I do I usually like watching ones that are true and that might have really happen because I want to know the raw feeling of believing that this event might really happen. Also this category is where evil people can control your mind and can play with it so that is also why I think this is scary is for that main reason because what if someone controlled my mind.

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    I gained that if tragedy is real and honest and if viewers witness flawed characters then horror will be at its best. I think this will benefit my reviewing on horror films because I do not like horror films that much and so I don’t really know how to review that type of genre. Also knowing what you need to look for in a horror film like if the tragedy is real and honest because if you know if the tragedy is real then you that the acting is true and that you can relate more to it the horror.

    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    I think this statement is true because in some aspects mysteries can be as suspenseful and scary as horror movies. Also horror movies itself can seem like mysteries because you never know when something is about to happen like jump scares and even when the scary person or object is going to be shown. I think they do cross because of the way they both work, mysteries and horror films are both suspenseful and even sometimes scary.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    It is most beneficial because it is easier for people to access you reviews and maybe even pay to see them because of how easy it is for people to look at your reviews. Also if people has mutual friends that also like to red reviews or look at reviews then they will send them to their friends then so on and so on. So just putting them out there for people to see will help you gain popularity and even gain you some money if you get famous enough.

    -Josh Rubino

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh – I completely agree here -“if tragedy is real and honest and if viewers witness flawed characters then horror will be at its best.” NTM

      Like

  16. evelky4 says:

    1. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films? How can/or will that help you in reviewing?
    I gained the insights of looking at the story aspects of a film instead of all the technical bits while reviewing it. This will help me in reviewing by making my reviews more professional and not amateur.
    2. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    I personally love horror films and the feeling I get when I’m creeped out. I am more drawn to the ghouls, ghosts, spirits, and unexplained phenomenon subgenre of horror. I believe that this is due to the fact that I have watched too many occurrences of paranormal activity, so now my brain is causing me to watch more and more.
    3. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    I gained the insight of how horror movies have evolved over the many years with special effects and CGI. This will benefit me in reviewing by appreciating the abundance of CGI in modern horror movies and the lack of the sort in older classic horrors even more.
    5. Offer some insights on any of the following:
    a. “How to Make a Horror Film” J. J. Abrams: The Mystery Box
    I have gained the insight of the actual minimum amount of things required for a horror/ suspense film.
    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?
    I find the most beneficial aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms to be the publicity so that people with all types of different baggage than you can comment and may allow you to see another point of view about the subject/movie. They can also constructively criticize the way that you are writing the reviews.
    -Edward Velky

    Liked by 1 person

  17. 1. What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films? How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    From the film critic Douglas Davidson, much is to be gained in terms of reviewing a film. One major insight that I have gained from Douglas Davidson is the statement of the messages behind a film, and more specifically how to examine them. Douglas Davidson has had a minor in Philosophy and from this, he is able to depict the reasons behind the film more clearly, even if it was originally thought that film and Philosophy were not to meet. Yet, the messages in a film are extremely relevant to the understanding, and thus criticism of the film, and will allow the viewer to more accurately depict and review the movie. Another interesting thing that I have obtained from Douglas Davidson is how he interprets his condition of hypnagogia, which could contribute to his film baggage. Nevertheless, Douglas Davidson does not allow his hypnagogia to influence his review of a film too much, even if it influences himself.

    2. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    Based on the readings, I fall more towards the side of Psychological Thrillers of the horror spectrum. I am more drawn to this type of horror film because they are closely related to reality than other types of horror films. For example, I enjoyed the film “Seven” because it was realistic while also teaching the viewer of the sins that they should not follow. Seven to me was a great film because of this realisticness yet, there was still a sense of horror and some disgust because of some of the scenes present, fitting with the horror genre.

    3. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?

    From the roots of horror and mystery, I have gained multiple insights into what the genres are and how to use this knowledge for increasing my abilities to review a film. For example, I have gained the insight that the best horror is based on your own fears, which normally allows the viewer to relate to the author, which could allow me to interpret and understand the author and their fears. I have gained the insight that fear can actually impact our bodily functions and actions, which could help my reviewing by having the knowledge of what true fear is where it influences your body.

    4. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?

    Sometimes when reviewing a film, it could be learned that a film could have aspects of more than one genre inside of it. For example, the film “Seven” as mentioned above could be considered as a mystery film while also having the potential fear of a horror film. Another example could be of the “Saw” series. In “Saw,” we see the individuals who suffer from Jigsaw and also those individuals who seek out Jigsaw to prosecute him. For suspense/mystery films, it is possible that a film could be also considered as a horror film while still a suspense/mystery film. For every film genre, it could be possible that films qualified as this genre could also be another film genre. One major reason for this is the potential lack of concrete definitions of a horror film or a suspense/mystery film; there is no certain method you have to complete to fulfill as a horror film.

    5. Offer some insights from any of the following:
    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.

    Both Jason Blum and Stephen King are some of the best creators in their profession, either as a filmmaker or as an author. Jason Blum, a filmmaker, started Blumhouse, one of the most successful film studios and has made such films such as Us, Halloween, The Purge, and many more. Stephen King, an author, has been considered one of the best horror/thriller authors ever and has written many books including The Long Walk, it, The Shining, Pet Sematary, and many more. From these two creators of their own craft, much is to be gained such as how they made their own success. They both made success by working hard on their work and taking chances.

    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?

    After exploring these readings, I have gained many more views and a deeper understanding of film criticism from the perspective of the critic. One of the most beneficial things in film review is getting your name out there to be known as a good critic of the film. For example, a critic can use and update a YouTube channel, Twitter account, or a separate podcast that are dedicated to film and review of a film, which to me could sometimes be difficult. But, if you do succeed in getting your name out on these platforms, you will likely have more viewers and potentially could earn sponsors and an income.

    -Nathanael Leclercq

    Liked by 1 person

  18. mzod21 says:

    What insights did you gain from film critic Douglas Davidson on his approach to reviewing films. How can/or will that help you in reviewing?

    What I gained from Douglas was that technicality isn’t everything which I believe to be true even though the role it plays is important so is the storyline which is just as important because you can have the best tech in a film but the story or plot can be bland or boring this will reassure me that it isn’t all about the technical details and will help me with my reviews by seeing past the technology and more into the story itself.

    Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I honestly love horror films they hold a special little place in my heart my top favorite being slasher films as well as disturbing psychological thrillers i’m not easily affected by these i kind of get a kick at how demented violent or confusing things can be. I will say that i stay away from most found footage type horror movies cause its difficult to produce that type of film and execute it perfectly in most cases they bore me to an extent.

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why? How will that benefit you in reviewing?
    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category.
    That what was considered scary today might not be considered scary noe for example The bride of frankenstein is very very tame but at its time of release it was meant to scare the pants off of people. People have built more of a tolerance so to speak so their goal is to get scarier and scarrier adding more emphasis on jumpscares, effects, tension etc. The way this’ll help me is in evaluation in which i decided if a movie in my opinion is actually a horror film or not and i agree that some suspense and mystery films fall into the horror category.
    After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria. Why do you feel this crosses genres?
    Offer some insights from any of the following:
    A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”
    I never realized that you could have very little and still execute a good horror movie an example that I know of is a Quiet Place which was a low budget film that became an amazing sensation.
    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse and Stephen King.
    An amazing author as well as an amazing film maker nothing can go wrong stephen king has a given talent for his books such as IT, Pet Sematary and the Shining that have been created into out of this world films. Jason Blum of Blumhouse created Us, Halloween, and The Purge films that are greatly applauded Us being the most recent classics such as these being memorable with eye and mind catching stories plots and of course horror.
    6. After exploring the readings about using YouTube, Podcasts and Twitter and Blogging & Reviewing for Money (and for free), what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) aspect of placing review-related thoughts on these platforms for you? Why?
    What i’ve learned is things can get rough from the critics perspective. Each of the mediums and platforms is usable to get their name out there and sponsors etc but, Things can go wrong with Youtube for example there is demonetizing and one mistake can either make you lose money or not get any profit. With such strict rules and regulations, and sometimes the voicing of opinion is limited for stater film critics.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. mzod21 says:

    -melanie degree

    Like

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