(Ch.4) Music & Sound Response Post due March 8

Due March 8 (by 11:59 pm) – Read and engage in all materials for chapter 4 and listen to at least one of the interviews with a featured film composer in this chapter. Address the following questions and post in the response section (or email or message me your feedback):

  1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
  2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
  3. What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

A. Address which interview you listened to.

B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.

C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

The above interview is with  multi award-winning composer Justin Hurwitz. Dialogue includes insight into Justin’s musical heritage & his sonic journey through Whiplash, LaLa Land & First Man.

John Ottman (above) is an Oscar-winning editor and composer for several X-Men films and the Freddy Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody.

The first 15 minutes of the above interview is with Junkie XL, composer for Mad Max: Fury Road and Justice League

 

The above interview is with Oscar-winner Steven Price. Price has been connected to greats like Hans Zimmer and Trevor Jones, and with work on such films as “Lord of the Rings” and “Batman Begins.” He was also involved in original music for “Baby Driver” and “American Assassin.”

The above interview is with composer Ryan Amon from the film Elysium

Long-time film composer Mark Isham (above) shares his view of music and cinema.

Film composer Mark McKenzie (above) has worked with the likes of Sir Paul McCartney, John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and Danny Elfman. His compositions have been featured at the Olympics and the Oscars. His influences have been heard on Dances with Wolves, Good Will Hunting, Sleepless in Seattle and more. On this episode of Cinemascene, McKenzie talks with Noel T. Manning II about his life, his passion for music and his film “The Ultimate Life.”

**Listen to one of these and share your thoughts below.**

 

47 Comments Add yours

  1. 1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    I found Jay Forry to be an amazing and inspirational person. You can learn valuable life lessons such as that your disabilities don’t define you and don’t give up. Mr. Forry is blind but he criticizes films. He bases his criticism off of sound, voices and the setting. He is a great example to others that you can do whatever you want all you have to do is try.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    I found how sound can change the meaning of a film to be the most interesting. The video of the Shining hallway scent was different every time the music was changed. When there was a simple relaxing song it seemed like a nice movie rather than a horror.

    3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

    I am drawn to electrical, techno, and pop music. My favorite composer is David Cutter I find his music energetic and relaxing at the same time. I like lots of music genres but I just like the flow of electric and techno music better. This type of music and either get me going or it can help me sleep.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    I listened to Junkie XL.
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Mad Max: Fury Road and Justice League are two films composed by Junkie XL.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    I found Junkie XL’s love for music quite unique. He loves the ability to use technology to put the music in films but he likes the original instruments too. He also thinks that the right music in a film can make it great. sometimes he has to work fast to make a film. Once he only had eight weeks to make a film he had to get it together to get this done he has to work twenty plus hours a day.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Junkie XL was great to chat with; he’s a versatile composer as well.

      Like

  2. Caitlyn Hamrick says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    Jay Forry is seems to be a fun guy. Jay Forry does not let limits of being blind dictate his life. I think I can learn the lesson that when your struck with a problem don’t slow down fight harder and you’ll be surprised by what you can accomplish.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    The fact that sound such as background music, sound effects, and deafening silence ties so much into the level of quality is very interesting to me in film making. The suspense and foreshadowing that can be created basically by the sounds you hear in the movie. The narrating that you hear in the background of a movie can change your understanding of what is going on in the movie so much. I will better enhance my senses of hearing when reviewing films and think about the value in it to a whole new level, when I am rating the quality of a truly good film.
    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    I found the category Backdrop/Backstage Musicals the most interesting because I did not know that movies that have a storyline that encompasses music but the story is not being told through song are considered musicals. I have always loved watching the “Pitch Perfect” movie series because it could always make me laugh and the singing was great in it, but I never would have categorized the movie as a musical because I would have never thought of the movie in that way.
    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    I listened to the interview for Junkie XL
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Two films from Junkie XL would be Mad Max: Fury Road and Justice League.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    I find Junkie’s independent approach to filming interesting because in the interview I listened to you hear him say multiple time it depends on the movie, and the story line, and the point of view. The movies are looked at individually instead of generalizing the music in the films to one specific area. Being able to start with something small that none of us notice and being able to build on it to turn it into something so great in a film was something I seemed to notice in his approach to composing in a film.
    ( I was unable to access the interviews at the bottom so I found another interview with one of the composers online)
    Caitlyn Hamrick

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Sorry you couldn’t access the interview (but happy you found another avenue). I did load MP3s on Bb as well.

      The different framings of “musicals” surprise quite a few people. Not all “music-related” films are the same.

      NTMII

      Like

  3. jmcmullens2 says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    My thoughts on Jay Forry after viewing the interviews and his life i think that it was interesting to see how he viewed movies. The way that he described how he used the sound to determine a scene and also how he had to pay more attention to the script to be able to understand and judge the movie. What I could learn from him, would be that when evealting the movie there can be more to it than the visuals sometimes what is missing from the visuals lies in the script. The script is something that should be evaluated to help you understand more and things as such.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    I already knew about this however i found it interesting that there was once live musicians that played the music for silent movies. I also find that the music and sound and also silence can add to the mood of the scene. This will help me when evaluating movies because th sounds and silence can add to the overall effect of the movie. Music or sounds can foreshadow almost what is about to happen or it enhances what is going on. I draws your attention a certain scenes. While it also is in some movies a transition and or a flashback onto something that happens. Listening to these things it can would make me pay deeper attention to what is happening and that could help me in evaluating a film.

    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    What i found new about musicals would be that there is more than one genre. I thought that musicals were all the same and there was not ways to put them into categories. Also there is musical that are not really musicals. Meaning that it is categorized as a musical because of its soundtrack and it can help with the character development or set the setting of the time period.

    Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    The interview that I listened to would be Junkie XL
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Deadpool(2016) and Divergent(2014) are some film that Junkie Xl have composed within the past four years.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    I found it interesting how he can add two things he love and apply that to movies. His love for music and film was added together through the advancements in technology. Overall i found it interesting that he have composed some of the movies that were once my go to movies. His approach fascinated me because in Batman vs. Superman the music that went along with it made it seem as if it was real life action. The way he approached new scenes with the music and change in color schemes made me really want to pay attention. I chose him because I have never heard of his name before. And come to find out he is someone that composed some of the Movies that I loved.
    Jada McMullens 03.06.19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Great point relating to “script” and Jay. Thanks for sharing that. – NTMII

      Like

  4. sugarymango says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    -He’s blind and still was able to review films. He focused on more sound and music designs and how they were important to reviewing film. The lesson you should get is just because you are limited in some capacity or if you are having struggles, there are still ways you can bypass or overcome them.

    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    – The most fascinating thing about the use of sound, silence, and music based on the lesson is how music can lead you into false security or thinking everything’s over. I really love how in horror movies, the character will be walking somewhere and in the background it is very soft, calming, etc and then the character gets ambushed or something. I played this video game with the same sort of things. The character would walk or sneak around and there would be this quiet but quick sounds that would scare me. But in multiple parts this ghost comes out and you can hear it if you’re used to the sound of strings and then it would scream at you. Well around when those parts should happen, the soundtrack is this quiet string part, but it’s not the ghost, so I’d be freaking out when it was just the soundtrack. It can help me in evaluation of cinema by understanding how music affects the mood and the tone and that not all creepy soundtracks can mean the ghost is right there.

    What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

    -Usually it depends on my mood. Like today, “I’m not having the best of days” would be an understatement and even though I really want to not be sad, I can’t help but to listen to sad things. I will, on other days, be drawn towards happier or upbeat music, unless I’m angry then it’ll probably be more dramatic music. I will listen to slower music more often though anyway so in movies it would be probably the sad scene song or the creepy part. I’d listen to the dramatic part for build up too.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to:

    Justin Hurwitz

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer:

    La la land (2016) and Whiplash (2014)

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)? :

    He knew he didn’t want to become a pianist or a performer. He got a sequencer for his 10th birthday and he started composting from there. I think it’s pretty interesting by how he became interested in composing because that’s a lot like me. I became introduced to music at a young age and I found out that I wanted to do something with music in my life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy (no name listed) – Your comment relating to score = “false security or thinking everything’s over” – yeah, that’s something worth exploring in films. – NTMII

      Like

  5. Gluna0303 says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    My thoughts on the Jay Forry interviews is that he seems to be a very interesting person in the sense that because he is blind, there is the downside of not being able to examine the film based on the visual aspects or quality, but he does capture some auditory aspects that we may not be able to so accurately. I liked how he was very honest about his situation and how he clarified some questions or assumptions people have about him. For example, he showed that just because he is blind doesn’t mean that he cannot do a fully accurate film critique, it is not impossible, but it also doesn’t mean that having no vision means having super hearing. I really liked how he talked about the different way that he could tell if a film was of good quality and things of such nature. The life lesson that I gained from that is that if he was able to become an expert at something that seems to require vision, and achieve it without the vision, it makes me feel more encouraged to pursue my goals because that is another proof that many things are not impossible to achieve although it may seem like it.

    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    I found fascinating how the whole article including the videos showed the importance of the way sound is produced in a film. I loved how some producers or composers were using everyday materials to make sounds to better emphasize the mood of the film.For example, how the sound producer created the sounds for starwars movies, i found that to be very fascinating because I personally love StarWars movies, but I always wondered how those special effect sounds like the light sabers when they were turned on, and I got to see that, so that was pretty cool to me. Another thing I was able to draw from this was how I will be able to distinguish the difference between quality of sound in a movie. For example, in most cases the background music in a thriller or horror movie in an intense scene, the music is what makes the intensity grow and so in a less quality movie, a thriller would not really keep you on edge because you don’t receive the same effects.

    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    I found that there are different types of musicals not just one. Some are not like the ones you would expect but in all, the song is what makes the unique singing scene have the mood set in the scene.I know that this isn’t part of the question but I would like to add that in my opinion I do not have a special interest in these types of movies. The one movie that was the one to capture my attention was The Greatest Showman because it wasn’t really as cheesy as the rest, at least in my opinion.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    The interview that I listened to was the composer, Justin Hurwitz.

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    One film he composed for was La La land and another was Whiplash.

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    What I Learned from this composer is that composing music for a film requires much creativity. There are parts in movies that don’t necessarily call for a basic musical instrument, like the ones found in a band or in an orchestra. Sometimes composers have to find unique or random objects that come together to make a specific required sound that just adds that extra touch to the film. What I liked about Justin Hurwitz and the way he composed was not only his history but how he realized that composing was something he would want to do for the rest of his life. He became very passionate about this job and I believe that passion is a very important aspect in a composer because they would be more willing to dedicate the time and effort to attempt to make their film the best it could possibly be.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Gabby -Film composers today are exploring “all types” of things to help achieve a film score … and not just traditional instruments. There is a great documentary that explores composers and their approaches
      – NTM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K6RwDM8VFE

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  6. 1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    I thought the Jay Forry was someone that was very positive about in the situation that he is in and the fact that he is blind and still critics movies is amazing. A life lesson I could gain from him though is that even in the toughest of times make the most of it because even thought Forry is blind he still goes white water rafting.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence, and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in the evaluation of cinema.

    What I found most fascinating based on the lesson was how much music and silence can change a movie’s entire motive. For example, in the Up scene the music is casual throughout most of the scene, but when Ellie dies the music slows down and becomes more depressing as it goes on. Another example is The Shining Hallway scene and how the music was changed to the point where it could appear like horror or joyful movie.

    3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

    I am usually drawn to pop music from artist like Panic! at the Disco and rock music from artist like Metallica, but I listen to a lot of other music as well. I’m usually drawn to pop because of it’s upbeat and energetic feel and it can usually get me energetic and get me going and rock because that is what my dad listens to so I just adapted and I don’t really know why.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    I listened to Steven Price.
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Two films from the composer are American Assassin and Baby Driver.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    What I learned about film composing from Price is that the longer you spend and the more involved you are into the composing the more you enjoy it and the better film you get. What also fascinated me about Price’s approach to composing is that a lot of people think that composing is a solo job, but Price says he believes that it is important to collaborate with the other composers for the movie.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan -Composing can be both solitary and collaborative. There’s a great doc on the art of film composing ; the trailer is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K6RwDM8VFE

      Like

  7. zachbaynard says:

    1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    I think it’s very interesting and inspiring how a blind person is able to become a film critic. He proves that no matter what circumstance or what disability you have that you should always follow your dreams and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in the evaluation of cinema.

    I think it’s really the emotions that these give the viewers. Like when it’s silent, it kind of builds up suspense like something huge in the movie is about to happen. Also, I think that music is very fascinating when creating movies as many movies have their music as their identity. For example, you can’t think of the movie Frozen without thinking of the music “Let it go” or “Do you want to build a snowman”.

    3. What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    One thing I learned was the different types of musicals. As I stated in one of my posts, I really hate “The Greatest Showman”. However look at the different types of musicals, one thing I learned was that there are different types of musicals. The Greatest Showman is a True Form Musical, where it’s about half of the whole movie. However, I learned that not all musicals are just like The Greatest Showman. Sometimes the music is necessary in order to understand the plot or message of the movie.

    4. So for this interview, I listened to Mark Mckenzie. He was a film composer in many plays such as The Ultimate Gift, The Greatest Miracle, and the Dragonheart Movies. One thing I learned was when he discussed The Ultimate Gift how he didn’t see the screenplay until it was finished. I also noticed when he stated he could have gone to a higher level, as he states he wants to be composing at a higher level.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zach -Film composers fascinate me. Some never see the script, others (Like John Ottmann) are involved from development -through post production, and some create based on general ideas and themes. It is an amazing business. NTM

      Like

  8. katiecstone says:

    1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    Jay Forry is a very inspiring individual, but I especially loved his sense of humor. His passion for adventure is powerful and I strongly think that it impacts how he reviews movies. He teaches how important the quality of sound is in a film. When people think of music within a film, they may just think of the score; However, the sound of waves crashing against a boat or footsteps in the snow are just as, if not more, important in creating a quality movie. An important life lesson that can be taught from him is this: Even if life gives you difficulties, push past them as best you can and enjoy the adventures that await you.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    How music impacts the audience was the most fascinating part of this section for me. I am influenced by this as much as everyone else is, and while watching the Babadook trailer, I did cover my eyes a lot. However, if the trailer had featured a Taylor Swift song playing in the background, it would not have been as spooky. It is crazy how our minds work!

    3. What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    The Atmospheric Musical was one I had noticed before, but I was never sure how to categorize it. The Guardians of the Galaxy films are great examples and because of how much I loved the movies, in turn, I enjoyed some of the old classics even more!

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.

    I listened to Justin Hurwitz (mostly for how much I love LaLa Land).

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.

    LaLa Land (2016) and First Man (2018).

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    Like Justin, I too, took piano lessons from the age of 6 until I graduated high school. I did not go into music because I knew I was not a pro and I did not want to teach, but unlike him, I was also not good at composing. Luckily for our ears, he is good at composing, and we are all blessed with the opportunity to hear his work. Justin talks about how much he focuses on pre-production, mostly so that the director can hear the themes before proceeding with the rest of the production process. If I were ever to direct a movie, I feel this approach would be one I would look for when searching for a composer.

    – Katherine Stone 3/7/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Katherine -Jay Forry really put into perspective the importance of sound design, silence and noise. Sometimes those of us who can see take that for granted. Babadook with a Taylor Swift soundtrack … interesting. 🙂

      NTMII

      Like

  9. Cinema Scope says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life?
    What life lesson can you gain from him? I think that after exploring Jay Forry’s interview’s and life, I see a better picture of blind people in general. He after he became blind went back to college, and he challenged himself to do things that most blind people wouldn’t dare to do such as white water rafting. Jay Forry gives us a very good life lesson, just because a challenge comes your way doesn’t mean that you give up. You continue to live your life to the fullest and you don’t let that challenge stop you from doing things.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    The most fascinating about the use of sound, silence, and music was how the mood of the scene changed so drastically when you change the music. When I watch the scene from The Shining about how when the music changed you get another feeling for each one, the first music they used was the music from the movie Halloween, which signaled when Michael was about to kill someone. Then it played to another type of music which was more laid back and fun. This shows how we picture the movie just by the music and sounds in the movie. I can later us to evaluate films by evaluating the music and seeing how it affects the mood of the scene, is it trying to make you feel a certain way towards the scene or is the music trying to decieve you from the real action that is about to take place.
    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    Something new I realized about musicals was that there were subgenres to musicals. I thought that a musical was actors breaking out into song after dialogue, I didn’t know that there was other types where the actor didn’t just break into song without no meaning.
    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    I listened to the composer Steven Price.
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Two films from him are Baby Driver and Lord of the Rings.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    One thing I’ve learned from Steven Price about composing is that it’s not a solo job, you do have to have multiple people collaboration together and talking together, it’s just not one person. Another thing that I learnt from listening to his interview is that the more experience and the more time you have in composing the more you like it and the better you get at it.

    -Jessica Randolph

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jessica, The sub-categories of “musicals” surprises quite a few people. But when you examine it that way, it gives a different appreciation for music in (and within) film. NTMII

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  10. Josh Rubino says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    My thoughts on Jay Forry is that he is a guy who is determined to do anything and nothing is stopping him just because he’s blind. He is a respected critic but he still needs help with reviewing movies, I think it’s cool how someone will tell him the action in the movie and he can see that in his mind. Also the way he talked about sound as being an important part of the movie, the movie that stuck out to him was Master and Commander. The way he could visually see the sounds in his head was amazing, like him saying, the waves hitting against the ship, and the wind gustling. I can learn from him that even though you might be going through something you can break those barriers down and keep going. Also that you need to look more in depth when watching a movie and it’s not only about the picture it is also the sound. This will help me look at different perspectives while watching a movie.

    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    What I found fascinating was that there four different types of sound vocal, environmental sounds, music, silence. Each of these sounds directors really look at to make their movie better and also more expressed. Also I never thought about this but how music can show emotion throughout the movie, I know about it showing emotion but I did not closely look at the way and the time that music comes in. For example when there is a really sad scene in a movie they usually play sad music to make it more expressive, also when they play action movie they play music that gives you that sense of anticipation which makes you want to keep watching. There are different ways also that music is used in a particular movie.
    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    What I found interesting was that musicals on film are not created equal, not all of them has their characters singing every minute. Also there is different musical sub-genres. For example True Form Musical/Integrated Musical, this one is where a film is combined with acting and singing continually. Another example is Backdrop/Backstage Musical, this one is where music and dance isn’t just part of the story in the movie, it is said to be the central to the story.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.

    John Ottman

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.

    X-men films and Bohemian Rhapsody

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    John Ottman started composing in his parents garage at the early age so he was exposed early. John Ottman gave cameras to extra crew members so they could shoot their angle of the movie so they can see what all goes on while they are filming and how much goes into making that movie. John put songs in the movie that he feels would work with the setting and the storyline of the movie. I thought it was neat that they had their other extra crew members filming the way the movie was getting filmed and all the cameras and people working together to make a movie. He said when they did it after the movie it gave them the sense of authenticity. Also he said in the interview that they added a character later in the movie so that shows me that while they were working on the movie they were also thinking of other stuff which can make the movie better. That’s fascinating how he can be working on this movie and already has a lot of going on then he was able to introduce another character.

    – Josh Rubino

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh -I’ve interviewed John Ottman a few times and always learn from him in our talks. The fact that he’s a film composer and editor add to his complexity and his appreciation for “all” elements of filmmaking. NTMII

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  11. travismc88 says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    It’s amazing that Jay would even choose to follow this path. Clearly, he has a passion for it. I can relate to what he says about it being a way to escape, especially due to all his hardships and challenges he has faced. His wife is truly a loyal and honorable woman. It is said that a great film tells the story with only the images, as in if you took away the sound and dialogue you should still be able to know what all is happening in the story only through the images. I tend to agree, like silent films of old. Though, Jay relies on dialogue, sound design for setting and the score to pick up on ques when things are shifting emotionally or tonally. I don’t know if any of you have listened to an audio book before but it’s awesome when they add those elements. Life lesson? Keep on truckin’ despite adversity. Do what you want to do even if the status quo says you shouldn’t be able to accomplish it. Blind Golfer? I want to play nine with him…

    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    Foley. Period. I first heard of Foley artist when I was a lad. There was a television series titled “Renegade” about an Army Ranger brought in by a D.A. t go undercover to investigate crooked cops. The show was a hit and they had a behind the scenes featurette one day on Entertainment Tonight or something like that (hard to remember, I was 7 or 8 years old) but it had a short part on the Foley artist and showed a Woman grabbing a Leather jacket and slamming it into the hood of a Jeep that was by itself on a table then the camera Panned over to a screen that showed the star slamming a leather Jacket wearing guy on the hood of an actual Jeep. He was roughing him up and interrogating him. They Panned back to the Foley artist sliding the Jacket around on the surface of the hood. Before then I always thought they just picked up all that sound live. In the Foley video in the article. However, I saw the extent they go to to get those sounds. The different pits of dirt they have to capture footsteps and all that. Wow. Also, Glad to see Cinefix featured on thefilmcritic. I respect their opinions and watch most of their videos.

    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    I never considered “The Breakfast Club” or “Top Gun” a musical, lol. However, those movies would not be the same without those soundtracks and they are layered music heavy. As stated in the article, they use the music of the period as long as it is relevant to the movie and the scene.

    Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    Address which interview you listened to.
    Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    As soon as I read “Lord of the Rings” and “Baby Driver” I knew I would listen to the Steven Price interview. Gravity (amazing score), Batman Begins (goes without saying), Fury, I wont mention Suicide Squad, Scot Pilgrim vs. the World (one of top favorite personal favorites), Pirate Radio (come on).
    I learned there’s no set rules for the sound design. Watch what the filmmakers give you and try new things and adapt to each project. Find out what works. From a subtle blink. To adding a note to that blink making it momentous. It’s fascinating to me as well as Price noticing that he used that word several times. But it is. Devoting your career to accenting films with music. Studying what works and doesn’t. When he said it was terrifying to do, I understood that for I can’t imagine taking on such a task. He said it having studied music at Cambridge and it still intimidated him. Setting the scene of him, alone in an audio room, with the duty of making a film even better with his score. People believing in his abilities and relying on him. Well you must have to just dive in and depend on your creativity.
    Impressive to work with Trevor Jones of “Labyrinth” and “Last of the Mohicans” as he mentioned early in the interview. Graduating from Cambridge is impressive on it’s own.

    Travis A McIlwain
    3/8/19

    Liked by 2 people

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Travis -Great in-depth feedback. I really appreciate your take on Jay (visual vs. auditory), and your “Renegade” example in the sound design section. – NTMII

      Like

  12. 1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    After exploring Jay Forry’s interviews and life, I have seen that he has been able to perform an action (film criticism) that largely depends on the sense of sight, which he does not have. From his example, we are able to ascertain that no matter your conflicts in life, we are able to push past our boundaries and make life how you examine it. I believe Jay Forry has done incredible things throughout his life, including being a blind film critic and graduating magna cum laude.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence, and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in the evaluation of cinema.

    The most fascinating factoid of the use of sound, silence, and music based on this lesson was Foley. This Foley is often perceived as the background noise, which can set an amateur film apart from the rest and make a film seem more alive with these background sounds. Foley is often added during the editing process, where editors are able to create their own Foley or used pre-recorded Foley that can truly make a film feel alive by adding Foley such as clothes rustling, the wind blowing, and the sounds of footsteps. I believe that the understanding of Foley can deeply impact my evaluation of film because as stated, Foley often brings a film’s audio life and can sometimes even be one of the main contributors to whether or not a film is a success or not.

    3. What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    I have found many things interesting about “The Musical” such as the different types of musicals, what classifies a musical as a musical, and how the Atmospheric Musical implements the music it uses. There are three main types of musical, which are the True Form/Integrated Musical, Backdrop/Backstage Musical, and the Atmospheric Musical. The True Form/ Integrated Musical is often classified as such because it contains music in which there is a combination of singing (and often dancing) with acting, and can also be classified where there is void of spoken dialogue but instead, the story is communicated through song and/or dance. The Backdrop/Backstage Musical is regarded as such because the music in it is essential to understanding the story of the film. The Atmospheric Musical is classified as such because the music within contains the vibes of the film, characters, or the period. Also, the lyrics can also represent the character, their motivations, moods, or conflicts but sometimes, the music is only implemented for the success of the film’s soundtrack.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    a. Address which interview you listened to.
    I have listened to Steven Price, an Oscar winner.
    b. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    This composer has created original music for films such as “Baby Driver” and “American Assassin” but has also had work with films such as “Lord of the Rings” and “Batman Begins.” Also, another film that he has been able to cooperate with was “Gravity.”
    c. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    Steven Price has had a wondrous time deciphering between music and the story portrayed by the film. Surprisingly, his parents did not play any instruments but he has learned to speak when younger through fiddling around with a record player and the songs emanating from it. Looking back at his past, he has had an early interest in exploring music and the accompanying instruments. One main thing for him was how each part of a film production team, is what it is: being a team and having collaborative natures together. Through Noel T. Manning’s interviews with other composers, the production is almost a solitary experience, much different than that of Steven Price’s views.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      NATHANAELJLECLERCQ (no name listed) – Great understanding of the “musicals” section, and in the future, I’ll want you to think about the impact of “Foley” on sound design in the films you explore. NTMII

      Like

  13. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    I believe that he is a great critic because in this chapter we talked that sound is a great part of film and since Jay Forry can not see his listening abilities are great and with that he has points of view that I and others don’t have towards reviewing films. He says that music is very important and he mentions how even the movements of things help out the film like the moving of a rope in the pirate of the carribeans. A life lesson that I gained from watching the interviews and reading the post was that even with a problem or an obstacle you can not let that hold you from doing things that you think you can’t do but you can.

    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    What interest me about the use of sound, silence, and music was that they are all very important especially music. Music sets a certain mood to the scene and that gives a great impact on the audience it allows us to feel emotions towards the scene which catches our attention. It tells a lot about what how the character is feeling towards what is happening the mood of the setting and others around them. If the music doesn’t fit the scene then it messes up the scene and film because then the viewers will be confused and become not interested in the film.

    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    Something new that I learned about musicals was that some films don’t have 10 minute break aways to sing and dance that are considered musicals although they are not really considered musicals they are called atmospheric musicals. They are just films that have songs that relate and sort of connect to the character.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    I listened to the interview about Steven Price.

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Suicide Squad and Gravity.

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    I learned that film composing is more of a collaborative work. The feedback and people pushing to complete the film makes the film better in his view. He also says that it is also good when others that they are working with are very interested in their work like Edgar Wright. He says that the feedback helps out a lot because it can help give another view of the work and it allows the composer see something that they didn’t see.
    -Marleny Martinez

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Marleny Martinez – Music has amazing influence on audience or at least it can); we’ve also found that music can also be symbolic of character(s). NTMII

      Like

  14. jscism5 says:

    1. I really enjoyed the interviews of Jay Forry and hearing his story. He is a very inspirational person who never let his blindness take away doing the things he loved. He also does things that a lot of people who are completely healthy wouldn’t even do. He said he has been water and snow skiing and speaking from experience these are very difficult things to do. I think the biggest life lesson you could learn from Jay Forry would be living life to the fullest no matter what obstacles you have.

    2. Personally I have never focused much on music when watching a film and I never realized how much of a role it plays. The music of a film can tell you so much about the scene and the movie itself without having to see what’s happening in the film at all. The most interesting part for me was to see how many ways music is used in film making. It can help set a scene, provide suspense, and even trick the audience into thinking they know what’s going to happen next. As I review films more I will pay much closer attention to the music used in movies and certain scenes and see how they help the movie and the things it gives away and also the things it throws me off track of.

    3. I never thought about certain films being considered musicals just because the music used in the background and how it really helps develop the story. Baby driver was one of the ones that really threw me, I have seen that movie multiple times and I know that music plays a very big role in this movie but I would have never considered it a musical.

    4. I listened to the interview with John Ottman. He has composed a lot of movies including multiple X-men movies and also Bohemian Rhapsody. The most interesting part of his composing strategy to me was when he said he used fear of the deadline for his inspiration. I thought this was very funny and it also hit home for me because that’s the same way I feel about homework assignments.

    Josh Scism
    3/8/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh, Remember when you classify films like Baby Driver a musical, to id the subgenre attached to it. Make sense? By the way, Baby Driver is a fave of mine. I saw that film and War for the Planet of the Apes on the same day. The sound design, silence, and music (as well as sign language) in both really blew me away.

      I loved your connection to Ottman and deadlines.

      NTMII

      Like

  15. mzod21 says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    -The life lesson that i’ve learned from him that no matter what disability you have weather it be blindness or loss of hearing you can still follow a dream or aspiration that you have having the thick skin to ignore the negative commentary and live life.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.-Each one assists in what the director is trying to show in the scene or the effect he’s trying to create for example in “up” the music was used to go through Carl and Ellie’s story all the way up to her sad moments and her death the music becoming dimmer and dimmer.
    What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why? Well the specific soundtrack that i am drawn to is the Coraline soundtrack created by french composer Bruno Coulais his compositions for the film fit with its theme perfectly at moments it is like an eerie child choir of sorts or it fits with Coraline’s actions for example Exploration was used when Coraline when exploring with her poison oak dowsing rod as well as when she was exploring the Pink Palace having a childish carefree feel to it.
    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.The one with steven price.
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer. Gravity, Baby Driver
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?I was most impressed with Gravity cause he had to go through the thought process of the question where would there be sound in space he focused more on the emotional journey of the character in the end but, also involving the reality of what space would sound like. The main genre of this films music being similar to 70’s rock. I just love how he takes an emotional as well as realistic perspective in the movies soundtrack to give guide through a character’s journey as well as giving the audience an accurate depiction of their surroundings.

    -Melanie Degree

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Coraline -wonderful soundtrack. Steven Price was such a joy to interview; we talked for another 15 minutes after the interview was over. He’s a really nice guy. NTMII

      Like

  16. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him? I think Jay Forry is very strong and independent. He didn’t let being blind stop him from being who he was and from doing his profession. I could learn to be strong like him so if anything comes my way, like blindness, I can still function happily with it.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    I think the most interesting thing about using sound or the absence of sound in creating a movie is where they use silence to convey a message or get real authentic sounds. Knowing the impact of silence can help me evaluate films because then I know that the silence is what makes the movie realistic or not, depending on if the movie needs to be realistic.
    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    I found that some movies that you wouldn’t think would be classified as a musical are classified as an atmospheric musical, which means the director chose songs just because they came from that time period and they want to reflect the time that the movie is set in.
    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    Junkie XL
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Justice League and Mad Max: Fury Road
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    I found it interesting how Junkie doesn’t exactly have a set type of music he chooses for his movies. With some composers, they have a specific genre or style of music but Junkie XL switches it up with every movie. He also combines small pieces of the movie and uses his knowledge of technology to create the perfect movie soundtrack.
    -Chastlyn Hoyle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      I believe that sound design is one of the most underappreciated elements of film (yet one of the most important). Finding realism in (or perceived realism) in film is a monumental task. As you explore future films, take a closer listen to those your evaluate. Thanks Chastlyn Hoyle

      Like

  17. petertuong says:

    1 .What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    At first I thought that it would be crazy to be a film critic if you couldn’t see the movie but he does make you understand that sound is close to being as important as the scenes. I think the life lesson gained was that no matter your disability or past you can still enjoy movies. One other life lesson I saw was that he was laughing at his own disability and he wouldn’t get mad or defensive when they cracked a joke about him.
    2 .What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    What I found most interesting about the use of the sound was how it could completely change the story’s tone, and how the directors use this to either put fear, suspense, or excitement in the viewer. This can help me now because it can help me know what the director and sound directors wanted us to feel and if I feel that then they succeeded.
    3. What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    What I found both interesting and new was that there are different types of musicals and they are categorized by how important or often music is used.
    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    I listened to the interview with John Ottman. Two of the movies he has worked on was X-Men: Days of Futures past and Bohemian Rhapsody .I learned that in some movies to compose a better view they will give the extra people cameras in order to get more shots and so that he will find a good angle. It was also interesting that he made sure to keep the music with the time period(s) by using source when needed.
    Peter Tuong

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      John Ottman is a talent; I’ve interviewed him a few times, and each time he brings something different to the interviews. He’s also a film editor, he uses double duty on many films. NTMII

      Like

  18. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    My thoughts/opinion on Jay Forry was how he viewed movies and the way that he used sound to decide the specific scene in the movie because he was blind. I never knew that they experimented with sound so much when a movie is being developed. It just goes to show me that more things happen behind the scenes when it comes to movie production that I originally thought. This taught me that sometimes in movie production to get the scene just the way you want it you have to go beyond visualising it.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    I was reminded that sound,music and even silence can add to any movie and keep any audience on the edge of their seat anticipating constantly what will happen next or foreshadowing. This would allow me to focus on the movie and could potentially help me evaluate it better.
    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    I found out that there are different types of musicals not just one type. I also learned that a film can be counted as a musical without actually being a musical. This is because of it’s soundtrack.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    The interview that I listened to was Junkie XL

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    Mad Max and Saturday Teenage Kick.

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    Some of my favorite movies were composed by him like Deadpool and Mad max. I even found out that he was responsible for the sound/music in batman vs superman which is one of my favorite movies of all time. When I heard his name for the first time I had no idea that he did all of these things and it upset me that I didn’t know him before because the music he used in some of his films really made me foreshadow and had me on the edge of my seat. He put his love for music and film together and made some very great movies that I wouldn’t mind watching two or even three times.

    Jahseim Merritt

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Junkie XL also goes by his given name Tom Holkenborg. You may want to see if you find any of his films with that name attached … you may like those soundtracks as well. NTMII

      Like

  19. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    He is an interesting person because even though he is blind, but that doesn’t stop him from reviewing films. A life lesson that I gained from him is to not let anything that blocks you from doing something important get in your way and that even the biggest challenges doesn’t make something impossible.

    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    The thing that I find most fascinating is how the music or silence can affect the viewer. With the sad scene from up, the music’s pitch lowered and became less of a happy pitch and I knew then that his wife was dying which made me tear up. But with scary movies the musics pace may pick up and the music gets faster and louder which gives the viewer a sense of fear and dread.

    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    I found everything but true form of musical interesting, because I didn’t know about Backdrop/Backstage Musical or The Atmospheric Musical. I honestly didn’t know that these other two types of musical films existed because I only considered movies that told the story through song as a musical.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    John Ottman

    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer.
    many X-men movies and Bohemian Rhapsody.

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?
    The thing that I found most interesting about John Ottman is how when they filmed he managed a bunch of things throughout the movie, but yet he inspired by his fear of meeting the deadlines which essentially made him come up with ideas quickly

    – Rileah Graham

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      The musical montage from “Up” is such an amazing and moving slice of cinema … I LOVE that film (especially the impactful story-telling of that scene). NTMII

      Like

  20. blakepow says:

    What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him? After losing his sight Jay Forry still tries to do his best with whatever he is faced with. He is a very optimistic guy for having no sight. He is very energetic and happy even though he lost his sight. An important life lesson that I can learn from Jay Forry is to keep an open mind no matter how much crap you have to take.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema. The most fascinating thing to me about the use of sound, silence, and music is that they all can make the same and different moods. If something is wanted to be ominous you would use silence to give it that effect. You can also use different sounds and music to give it that effect. I feel that every movie should have music because it would be really dull without it. This will assist me in evaluating cinema because it will be easier to describe the moods and tones of the characters. It will also help me to find what the director of the film is wanting us to feel.
    What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    One new thing that I learned about the musical is that it is split up into three different categories, I didn’t know that before. I thought a musical was performed on a stage in front of a crowd. It is really interesting how specific a whole category can be.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to. I listened to the Justin Hurwitz interview.
    B. Name at least 2 films from the composer. Two films from the composer are “Whiplash” and “La La Land”.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)? I was fascinated with how much effort Justin Hurwitz puts in his compositions. It is hard to find people these days who are genuinely passionate about something.

    – Ethan Blake Powell

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Ethan Blake – As you explore your films for review for the remainder of the semester, try to take a close listen to the sounds, silence and musical score and how those three shape the story. NTMII

      Like

  21. Chapter 4 Dialogue and Response

    1.What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?
    My thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry is that he is pretty cool to be a fil, critic but to be blind as well. He is determined to not let anyone stop him from doing anything. The life lesson I gained from Jay Forry is that no matter what happens in life it is what you do with is that matters. You can either let whatever happened determine you and make you negative or make it into something positive and continue to grow as an individual.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.
    The most fascinating to me about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson is is that music allows the director to amplify the drama in the film. This will assist me in the evaluation of cinema by allowing me to see what songs or sounds they use to make the film more dramatic. This will also help me see how to make certain scenes.

    3. What did you find interesting or new about “The Musical?”
    I found it interesting that not all musicals have people breaking into a new song every ten minutes or talk in song throughout the film. I also found out that “The Greatest Showman” is a true form of musical. This is because it’s a film that combines acting with singing and dancing without it being weird or awkward.

    4a. John Ottman
    4b. He has worked on The Fantastic 4, Gothika, and X-Men:Apocalypse.
    4c. I learned that that he tends to songs into the movie in order to with for storyline in the movie and the setting as well. In the interview that was given he said that he had put in additional character(s) later on into the film such as in the X-Men films. Doing this has shown me that even though he did not have to put the character in there he did in order to make it better. He is always thinking of ways to improve his films throughout the production stages.

    Yunique Wilson

    Like

  22. noeltmanning says:

    March 8 – Edward Velky –
    What are your thoughts
    on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life? What life lesson can you gain from him?

    I find Jay Forry’s story very inspiring because he lets me know that I don’t
    need to be excellent at everything in order to review films. I learned to not let your disabilities shape who you are.

    What is most fascinating
    to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson? Explain how that will assist you in evaluation of cinema.

    I was fascinated with the fact that there are 6 ways that music is used
    in cinema. This will help me analyze the sounds in a film and how I should feel about them.

    What did you find
    interesting or new about “The Musical?”

    I learned that there is more to a musical than characters busting out in
    song every 10 minutes. It could be considered a musical based on the background soundtrack.

    Address the following
    questions after listening to one of our featured composer interviews and respond at the bottom of this post:

    Address
    which interview you listened to.

    I listened to John Ottman’s interview.

    Name at least 2 films
    from the composer.

    X-Men: Days of Future Past and Astro Boy

    What did you learn
    about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    I was fascinated that he decided what he wanted to do on what he has been
    doing and not about money.

    -Edward Velky

    Like

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