(Ch.3) Dialogue/Response Post Assignment (Due March 1)

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After you dive into all the topics of Chapter 3, you will need to address the following response/dialogue topics and post your feedback at the bottom of this Dialogue page (or email/message me with your comments if they don’t post). Answer any three of the following:

Questions for Consideration (Due March 1, 11:59 pm):

  1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

 

  1. After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged.

 

  1. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels” choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

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48 Comments Add yours

  1. 1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    I have always known about some farming techniques alike wide angle and close up but I never thought that there could be so much more. These other framing techniques include medium long shots, medium close up shots, high, and low angle shots. All of these angles are important while making a movie. The viewers will lose interest if the film is only at one angle the whole movie. My personal favorite film angle is the bird’s eye view. I have a drone and I love to see things from the sky.

    2. After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio segment you engaged.

    I listen to Mr. Tom Sigel. The thing that I found the most interesting about Mr. Sigel is that when he was in high school he bought a super 8 camera when he was in high school. He made some films with his friends. (I do the same with my GoPro). After that, he went to New York and continued to make small films and paint. The other thing that I found interesting is that Mr. Segel looked up to his older brother for guidance. Mr. Tom Sigel wanted to do better so he took his brother’s love for photography and made it move.

    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in the film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    One of the most recent movies I have seen is Venom. The colors were mainly dark these colors include black, silver, and grey. These colors symbolize the danger of Venom. It also represents Venom as an advanced species with some advanced skills. Towards the end of the movie during a romantic scene, the colors lighten up a little to a nice yellow, green and blue. This was to life the mood.
    Dylan Mistretta 2/25/19

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan – Thanks for your feedback. Venom definitely made use of the dark and brooding colors to reflect the dark nature of the character and situations. -NTMII

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  2. Caitlyn Hamrick says:

    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    The framing techniques used to create a certain emotion such as inferior or claustrophobic are some techniques I learned about that I think will help me a lot in critiquing films. Learning how insink the director and the cinematographer I feel is really important because I never realized how much the choosing of the film angles can truly affect the film. I never thought that simply the angle of which the scene is being shot can be used to create a certain tone or mood in the movie. When I think about it though the angle at which you shoot the scenes really make the film that much better in quality and unlocking the true mood and story being unfolded on the big screen.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”
    I believe that knowing that when you review an adaptation you should always view the adaptation and the original as two different things because your film baggage could unfairly affect your review on the movie. I found the analogy used for viewing adaptation as very smart and different. Using the analogy that the original and the adaptation are both similar different like you are to your family. Keep the original in mind but view the movie as different. I feel this way because this analogy says a lot alone and will definitely change how I view films in this category.

    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    When the film “Bumblebee” came out and theaters I went and watched it and I think that the reason why Bumblebee is yellow is because yellow can be used to represent young, insecure, imaginative, naivete which I think really describes who he is because he is the youngest of the autobots and he is taking on a job that is a little inferior for him, and I think that taking on this job would cause him to feel a little insecure and naive. Just like in all other action movies the fights that occurred normally happened which a dark and gloomy color scheme, which represents fear, death, and the unknown. Understanding these color schemes will better help me figure out the tone/mood and the overall message because the color scheme can portray a certain feeling or tone in the film.
    -Caitlyn Hamrick

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Glad that the lesson on adaptations will help in the future; great example with Bumblebee. -NTMII

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  3. Cinema Scope says:

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”
    I never knew that there where different types of drama, reality and documentary. I thought they were just all three different genres but they aren’t, they are three genres with smaller genres going with it. But it makes total sense because all documentaries aren’t the same, some are fact based and don’t have any opinions and some are very biased and opinion based. That’s where the sub genres come in and helps section everything off instead of it being very vague. So when you are looking for a movie you have sub genres so you have more to pick from.

    After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.
    A recent film I watched is Harry Potter, these movies has a lot of red and blue as their color scheme. This explains a lot because in these film the scenes are usually full of danger or sadness. Blue represents cold, loneliness, and sadness and there is a lot of that in Harry Potter. Red represents violence, rage, anger, aggression, and danger. In Harry Potter there is a lot of danger and violence so I can see why most scenes are in this scheme. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Harry and his friends go to the Ministry of Magic because Harry thinks that Voldemort has Sirius, his godfather. Throughout all of those scenes the color scheme is blue which represents the sadness that Harry is feeling throughout this scene. Understanding the use of color themes in film can help a lot in understanding the directors and filmmakers intent. You can understand the feelings in the scenes more by looking at the color theme in the shot along with the emotions the actors are portraying.

    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    When reading this passage I discovered a lot more camera shots than I didn’t know about before. I knew about a few camera shots such as a close up but most of the others I had no clue about them. One that I discovered that will help me in critiquing is the long shot and the medium close-up shot. The long shot will help me with the setting the character is in and the medium close-up will help me evaluate the characters emotions in the scenes.

    -Jessica Randolph

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jessica, As you dive into your next review, you’ll put the understanding of framing and angles to work. Go back to that material if needed. Great examples with Harry Potter (color theory). NTMII

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  4. zachbaynard says:

    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    I think the most interesting framing technique was Movement and Action. I think this is important for filmmakers to get the movie at just the right angle. Also Dolly’s are very interesting as well, as they provide a flat surface and the exact angle for a movie to be shot at. I always thought it was drones that changed the angle of the camera just like they do in NFL games, but I was wrong.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    Evaluating remakes and sequels I think will really help me in understand cinema critique. I feel this way because I think that it’s important for filmmakers to understand how they can make an older film more popular by making the remake. For example, I saw the remake of Annie back in 2016 and thought it was an original. But I was wrong, as the original movie was made back in 1982. So that next day, I then watched the original.

    After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    So for this question, I’m going to use my favorite movie being the Maze Runner. At the beginning of the movie, the main character Thomas wakes up at what the movie calls “The Glade”. The Glade is mostly grassy with some stone walls surrounding it. I think this hue makes perfect sense knowing that many scary parts are involved in this movie. Also it symbolizes luck as that’s what the gladers (the members of the glade) want in order to escape the glade. I think understanding color scheme will be very important because this gives a movie it’s happy romantic, or scary tone. It also helps manipulate the audience and give them emotions.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zach – The Oscar-nominee from 2018 “A Star is Born” was actually the the 4th version with that title and another with the title: hat Price Hollywood? : https://medium.com/@cranberries/the-four-previous-versions-of-a-star-is-born-plus-the-real-story-1b284ceed3b

      The Maze Runner examples is a nice one for Color Theory. You’ll be putting that exploration of color theory into action for your next review. NTMII

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  5. sugarymango says:

    After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    The most recent film I’ve seen (that I can remember) is Equalizer 2. The scene that I can remember with a color-scheme is when Robert McCall had to go to the coast to finally deal with the antagonist. There was a hurricane there meaning the sky was dark grey and most of the water was a dark blue-grey. Usually grey means uncertainty or foreboding. It definitely meant the second one. You could just tell that something bad was going to happen to one of the three characters there. I think I can use color-scheme to analyze what someone is trying to convey. (mood or tone) This will help me recognize the colors and what they mean.

    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    I learned about different camera angles and how they can affect the mood or tone the story is trying to convey. Extreme Wide-shot may be included because they want you to look at scenery or pay special attention to where the characters are. Wide-shot/full shot focuses on especially the main character or the character in the shot. This would show a specific achievement, how the character is built, how they react to certain things, etc. Close-up shots above focus on the head, from an angle above the face. This helps portray emotions and can sometimes make it seem a little more scarier than it really is. There are many more, but this was my favorite part of the article, I learned a lot from it.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    I think one thing that surprised me is “if you wait longer than five years in between franchise films/sequels, then it will be a bomb.” I had never thought of that before. I guess it makes sense since whenever I read, play a video game, or watch a movie sequel, it’s worse than the first one, and then if it’s a trilogy, then the third one is typically better than the second. It usually goes like that, sometimes the second one is the best and the other aren’t. But in my case, I’ll read a book in a trilogy and the first one is amazing, oh my goodness I can’t wait to read more, then I read the second one and it just doesn’t interest me, but it does enough to read the third one which is almost as good as the first. I can give an example of this, In 5th grade, I read the first book of The Hunger Games 15 times, but when I read Catching Fire I read it once, (since then I’ve read it 2 more times.) and I read Mockingjay 6 times. In my opinion Catching Fire wasn’t as good as the first one. I feel like that’s the same with other films and books, games too. I had never thought of if it’s 5 or more years apart, it might be crap.

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  6. sugarymango says:

    After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    The most recent film I’ve seen (that I can remember) is Equalizer 2. The scene that I can remember with a color-scheme is when Robert McCall had to go to the coast to finally deal with the antagonist. There was a hurricane there meaning the sky was dark grey and most of the water was a dark blue-grey. Usually grey means uncertainty or foreboding. It definitely meant the second one. You could just tell that something bad was going to happen to one of the three characters there. I think I can use color-scheme to analyze what someone is trying to convey. (mood or tone) This will help me recognize the colors and what they mean.

    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    I learned about different camera angles and how they can affect the mood or tone the story is trying to convey. Extreme Wide-shot may be included because they want you to look at scenery or pay special attention to where the characters are. Wide-shot/full shot focuses on especially the main character or the character in the shot. This would show a specific achievement, how the character is built, how they react to certain things, etc. Close-up shots above focus on the head, from an angle above the face. This helps portray emotions and can sometimes make it seem a little more scarier than it really is. There are many more, but this was my favorite part of the article, I learned a lot from it.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    I think one thing that surprised me is “if you wait longer than five years in between franchise films/sequels, then it will be a bomb.” I had never thought of that before. I guess it makes sense since whenever I read, play a video game, or watch a movie sequel, it’s worse than the first one, and then if it’s a trilogy, then the third one is typically better than the second. It usually goes like that, sometimes the second one is the best and the other aren’t. But in my case, I’ll read a book in a trilogy and the first one is amazing, oh my goodness I can’t wait to read more, then I read the second one and it just doesn’t interest me, but it does enough to read the third one which is almost as good as the first. I can give an example of this, In 5th grade, I read the first book of The Hunger Games 15 times, but when I read Catching Fire I read it once, (since then I’ve read it 2 more times.) and I read Mockingjay 6 times. In my opinion Catching Fire wasn’t as good as the first one. I feel like that’s the same with other films and books, games too. I had never thought of if it’s 5 or more years apart, it might be crap.

    *I don’t know which one will send so…*
    -Lucy Holland

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy – Equalizer – great example and understanding. You’ll have to dive more into the understanding of this with your next review.

      Thanks for your feedback on sequels too. The 5-year gap = failure isn’t always the case (Blade Runner:2049), especially in animation (Toy Story 3, Finding Dory, Incredibles 3), but for Live action films success doesn’t usually follow films that have long gaps in between.

      NTMII

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  7. 2. After engaging in the section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged.

    I listened to Tom Sigel and what intrigued me most about what he said was how he was influenced by his photographer, older brother and how he also hated him at the same time. It is hard to do something anything relatively close to what your older sibling is doing and he wanted to make his older brother’s photography move. I was also impressed on how he got a fellowship at the Whitney Museum because all he did was save up some money for a Super 8 camera and made some little films with his friends with that camera to get the fellowship.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    One element that surprised was that fact that one of the reasons that Hollywood remakes films is because the original is not widely well known, or beloved, or the original is not well-known to US audiences because I think if it’s an original that is just not well-known then it should just be renounced unless it does not live up to the standards of today. I think if it just got the recognition that it would be more known so it would not waste money to make another one. I think the two things from the article Evaluating Remakes and Sequels though is that the Hollywood remakes films that are dated and that they also remake movies that did not hold up to the times. These things can help me by reviewing the old and the new and comparing them to see if it was really worth it and if the old movie was still a good movie.

    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    A film that I have watched recently has been A Quiet Place. The color scheme that this movie has is mainly black throughout the movie and it represented fear and unknown when it was used. I think that understanding the use of color-themes in the film will help me understand the director’s intent by allowing me to use the colors to dissect what the tone or mood of the scene or movie is and it can also help me understand why a character is doing a certain action or acting a certain way.
    -Dylan Swofford

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan, Good example with A Quiet Place. Listening to filmmakers like Tom Sigel really can help to provide insight into filmmaking; we’ll have plenty of opportunities this semester for that. So many films we see in the US are based on international releases (especially horror films). Thanks NTMII

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  8. katiecstone says:

    1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    The Low Angle Shot was one that I was familiar with, but the description of it was interesting to me. It was described as, “makes the viewers feel inferior or helpless.” I have felt those emotions while viewing scenes from that angle, but from now on, I will study why the director wanted the audience to feel that way in the moment. The Extreme Close-up Shot is also very intriguing since it is used to tell a story by only showing a tiny fraction of the actor’s face. I feel as though this kind of shot presents more of a challenge to the actor, which in turn, will help them improve on their craft.

    2. After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged.

    I listened to Seamus McGarvey’s interview for this section. What intrigued me the most about his interview was how he talked about the colors in his cinematography. He talks about growing up in Ireland – which is always several (not 50) shades of grey – and how that influenced the colors that he uses when he shoots a film. He then goes on to explain how he shot “The Greatest Showman” on the complete opposite side of his usual color spectrum. It is refreshing to hear that as a cinematographer, you are not limited to only one choice of style.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    In the Understanding Adaptations section, I was shocked with the small amount of original films that have been produced recently. While I know that a lot of movies are based on books, in my head, it seemed as though those movies could be considered “originals” since they were the first to be made about a particular book. That, of course, is the wrong way of viewing it. Another part that I thought was interesting was the Loose Adaption section. I had put together that “West Side Story” was “Romeo and Juliet”, but I had never caught the “The Lion King” and “Hamlet” correlation.

    – Katherine Stone 2/27/19

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Seamus McGarvey was so much fun to interview; I really enjoyed chatting with him. Take those thoughts and understandings of color theory and cinematography to mind; you’ll be putting them into play for your next review.

      I’ve been exploring “adaptations” in film for several years, and the percentages of originals get less and less. NTMII

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  9. 1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    Based on this reading, I have discovered or re-discovered many types of framing techniques, such as the Wide Shot, Close-Up Shots, Angle Shots, and the Zoom Shot. These type of framing techniques are all important to the element of the story because the use of camera normally dictates the success rate of a film. When a film has poor performance in the use of the camera, which is the DP’s task, that film would generally have poor viewer ratings, even if the story is extraordinaire. To me, the Zoom Shot is particularly interesting because it allows the enhancement of emotion while revealing action as well as the possible setting. Other types of shots, such as the Dutch Angle Shot, also draws the viewer in through the creation of mental and visual imbalance. Also, it is very worth noting that other types of framing techniques, such as lighting, clarity, light and shadow, and focus and depth, are also extremely important in determining the quality of a film. The knowledge of these types of framing techniques may help me in critiquing films because these framing techniques are what the audience generally may see, with the addition of potential editing when necessary.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    After engaging in these sections, I believe that because film adaptations or films based upon other source content have made up 88% of the top ten films of the year for the time between January 2009 and December 2018, film adaptations are an extremely important and relevant topic of the study of film. The knowledge of film adaptations is extremely important because they will most likely make up a large selection of the films that one would critique. Another point of consideration, film adaptations are intriguing to me because they allow one population to transfer from a certain medium to another medium, which is the film screen.

    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent?

    In a recent film that I have viewed, which was the Dead Poets Society directed by Peter Weir, there were multiple colors. One such color, which was white detailing John Keating’s classroom, this represented goodness, simplicity, purity, and cleanliness of John Keating and Welton Academy. Understanding the color-themes in a film would help acquire knowledge of the meaning behind the film as well as attract the viewer. Also, knowledge of the color-theme will allow criticism to be better associated with the film’s meaning behind the story and the colors which submit subliminal messaging.

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Nathaneal – (name not listed) -Great understanding of this chapter. For your next review, you’ll put the understanding of cinematography into action (as well as color theory). Good example from DPS. – NTMII

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  10. noeltmanning says:

    Peter -My response is not submitting so I am sending it over Email
    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    After reviewing the different framing techniques I think that the ones that will help me will be the medium close-up, the close-up, and the confined space shot. I chose these because the focus on the characters and the setting which is very important to a film, these frames, if done correctly, can help you criticize the actors and the settings. This is because it focuses on the character and we can see how well the actor is trying to do the right actions, motions, and emotions. It can also help us with the setting because it can convey emotions the directors want you to feel(ex. confined space shot makes you feel like you’re in a small space).

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,”and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    One element that surprised me was that many movies that are being made and have made it to the top have been either adaptations,prequels, or sequels. This surprised me because I thought there would be more popular movies that were original but I guess people are more interested in stories they already know or they were interested in before.

    After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    The most recent movie I have watched is The Matrix and what I noticed is that throughout the movie the colors of green, dark green, and black were constantly in the tint, costumes, and overall scenes. If you have watched The Matrix you should know that the movie is heavy on technology and code so I think that the colors I mentioned are to reinforce that they are in the computer world. They tie it in with the iconic green code(image). The use of these colors can help us understand that the world we thought was real was actually computer made(which the main character is still trying to grasp throughout the movie).
    Peter Tuong

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Peter -Good example with the Matrix (color theory). I believe that the reason there are fewer original stories is tied to costs, previous knowledge, and “story formulas.” -NTMII

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  11. Sorry for not posting my name at the end of the assignment.
    -Nathanael Leclercq, 2-28-2019

    Liked by 1 person

  12. evelky4 says:

    1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    I discovered the Dutch Angle Shot and believe that it will help me in critiquing films because I know when the cinematographer wants me to feel that there is imbalance in the movie’s world. For example, in Thor, when Thor is frustrated that Odin won’t let him go to Jotunheim, there is imbalance in the family, so they used a dutch angle shot. I also gained the information that being the cinematographer for a film is one of the hardest jobs in making a film. It is important for the camera to be worked just right because it makes the movie more interesting and the camera angles also has different symbolisms.
    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”
    I found it intriguing that only 12 of the top 10 films from the last ten years are original films and the rest were adaptations. I feel like this because the fact that adaptation movies are actually good even though they might have bad source material.
    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.
    A movie I watched recently that follows color theory is Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2. It using a mainly blue and black theme because the movie is about sadness, evilness, and death.
    -Edward Velky 2/28/2019

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Great example with Thor (dutch angle); understanding the purpose for these shot selections can help us understanding characters, story and motivations. Good example from Harry Potter. -NTMII

      Like

  13. Gabriela Alicea Luna says:

    1)Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    From what I read I see that it is a very important thing to have the right framing techniques when it comes to filming a video. First, I learned that having the right filming techniques helps the editor when producing the movie to have more to work with which in turn makes a better film production. Another thing is the camera type that is used to film. I learned that in certain films people have used inexpensive cameras like a GoPro which helped in the way that they earned way more money in the end. I feel that it is important because having a good camera leads to a good production and if that is able to reach with a cheaper camera it is also great for business.

    3)After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    One thing that surprised me was that many of the popular films that we know today were inspired by unknown films that were created and although it is smart I feel that those films should have been more credited. I think it is smart because then these people can use these ideas to make money.

    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    There was a TV series that I used to watch called Black mirror.This TV show was very symbolic. Every episode had some color scheme but mostly it was grey and white symbolizing regularity and how people lived in a society where people had to live under the same rules and morals in order to remain pure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks for sharing Gabby (name not listed) -Black Mirror without a doubt dives into color theory. NTMII

      Like

  14. jmcmullens2 says:

    Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    Based off reading “ The Camera” I learned what framing was in bgeneral. I have never heard of this term beside like framing a picture. The whole article to me was new and informing. I believe that knowing all of them would help help you with critiquing films but the most import one would be medium close up. I feel this is important because when it is closer you can see the facial expressions as the article said. There is more to evaluate than just seeing the person adding that facial can make you get the feel of how it actually is. For example in 12 Years Slave when there was this framing of Solomon you could feel his pain and things as such.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”
    After reading these section the section that intrigued me would be “Understanding Adaptations”. Out of this passage i got that adaptations are different than i thought it was. Before reading it i thought it meant a simple break down of the meaning of the movie or the storyline. However it is really how it is changed from something else. It has a storyline of its own for example in music when you listen to it you get one thing while if you were to watch the music video it can portray a deeper meaning and context of that same meaning in a different way. Movies of a book that was previously out before the movie the producers made an altination so that it makes sense in the sense of a movie.This was interesting for me because i simply thought it was something completely different.
    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.
    After looking at the colory theory a Movie that i watched lately that had multiple color schemes would be Nobody’s fool. In this movie when something suspicious was to happen it would be of the darker colors and lowering the amount of light within the colors to make it appear different. In the scene of an investigation you would notice that the lights are dim and the characters are wear more toned down colors creating that mood of suspense. I also saw a color scheme of pinks in the main characters house and in the clothing that some wear. However when times were good it was bright colors and colors that make you seem happy and things as such that correlates with the bright colors. It makes you overall happy and feel good about what is happening.
    Jada McMullens 03.01.2019

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jada -You mentioned “framing of Solomon ” in 12 Years a Slave allowing you to feel his emotions. What type of framing was used to engage you (close up, extreme close up, dutch angle)? When you explore and review your next film, you’ll need to be descriptive of the angles, framing, and color theory to defend your thoughts. Thanks for sharing your interpretations on Nobody’s Fool as well. Color theory will need to be explored for your next review, so you’ll need to revisit this section. NTMII

      Like

  15. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    All of this was new to me so I learned a lot, but I think the most important framing techniques to know would be movement and action, medium long shot, medium shot, medium close-up shot, and close-up shot. For example, for any long, medium, or close-up shot, it is important to try to make every detail stand out on the person in a way that fits the setting and the mood of what’s happening in the movie. A close-up shot would probably be used for an extreme dramatic effect and to make the actors emotions pop out more, while a medium close-up would still be used for a dramatic effect, but you’d get to see the body movement they make, which could be important because what if they draw a knife. It would be important to know the person’s actions because if everything was just at one angle, the film wouldn’t have any meaning and it would probably be hard to tell what’s happening at some points in the film.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    I think the main thing that surprised me was that there are different types of drama, reality and documentary. I thought that the different type of drama were all just one big thing and I thought that reality and documentary were basically the same thing because most of the time a documentary film is based on a true story, but a documentary can be opinion based sometimes, so thats what makes it different from a reality because it someone might just fill in a blank with there own opinion rather than exploring deeper into the topic of the documentary. I feel like knowing the different types of drama, reality and documentary will help me understand cinema critique better because I now know that there are different types of parts within that genre and knowing those different parts will help me better when analyzing a drama, reality and documentary film.
    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    The last film that I recently saw was The Lorax. For this film the color scheme for the lorax was basically bright colors like lime green, orange, pink, blue, and ect. In Thneedville the colors are bright to symbolize that everyone is happy, but outside of thneedville, where the Once-ler lives, the colors were dark, mostly grey, and gloomy to symbolize destruction and sadness. I think that understanding the color scheme will help me understand the mood/tone that the director is trying to display, so that I can better understand the film and understand what the character in the film might be feeling.

    – Rileah Graham

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rileah, The Lorax is filled with colors (and themes); good choice. Even in animation color theory is used. I’m glad to know that you gained an understanding of camera and cinematography -you’ll put that to use for our next review. NTMII

      Like

  16. travismc88 says:

    What framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. What else did I gain from that reading that you feel is important and why?

    The low angle shot for sure can be very effective when utilized properly. I agree with the article when it states that it can make the audience feel small and inferior. That’s a feeling that is ingrained within our psyche from when we were children and that’s how we saw the world and adults. Another note of my own is we feel that unconsciously (unless your studying films as we here are) so it feels uncomfortable or unnatural to see people from that POV. Similar to the classic set-up of lighting someone from the ground or even putting the flashlight under your chin while telling ghost stories is unsettling: the natural world doesn’t normally emit light from the ground so it feels just wrong to see people that way.
    As for what else I gained from the article: just a reminder that everything (a good director) puts in the frame is important. What the audience sees needs to be important to the story and not purposeless.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised Me, intrigued Me, or that I feel will truly help Me in My understanding of cinema critique.

    Well, first of all your article, “Drama, Reality and Documentary” filled me in on exactly what “Oscar Bait” truly means and the timing of those film’s release. I never really considered that time period before. I know you have the summer blockbusters, the horror movies for Halloween and your family hoiday movies and their release dates being linked to those time periods. I digress. What intrigued me was you analysis of what drama really means. I enjoyed your quote, “drama has a way of reflecting who we are, who we hope to be, or who we hope we aren’t.” You informed me that “Drama” doesn’t have to be fabricated, it is in everyone’s live’s. Though, in bio-pics it’s often at a greater scale, for if it wasn’t…well they wouldn’t be putting it on the silver screen. If I screw up today, it only effects me. If Lincoln screwed up, it effects a Nation of a people.

    Name a recent film I’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help Me understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    I’ve noticed the use of color in most programs I’ve watched and always believed that there was no set rules for color usage. This has become very important knowledge to obtain. I thought that the colors were used contextually to each film, scene or show. There is an internet series called Red vs. Blue and the colors aren’t important (or are they) that’s just the colors of the two different groups of characters. It’s simply an us vs. them motif. So, this piece was eye opening. Not the most recent film I’ve seen but a more recent film that immediately came to mind when reading this blog was “Atomic Blond” with Charlize Theron. Most scenes have a vibrant, neon backlighting that they use. When a spy is getting murdered in a scene it’s a striking red. Certain dialogue scenes there’s Cyan (I think) lighting throughout the club. When they drop the fantastic lighting to when she’s in an interrogation room describing the events throughout the film (thanks to non-linear story-telling) it has a more realistic lighting arrangement. Certain fight scenes are also lit realistically. Including a nearly eleven minute scene where the camera (due to fantastic Cinematography and Editing) appears to never cut away. It appears to be one long take of Charlize fighting multiple thugs on her way down a stairway and into a car-chase sequence.

    Travis A McIlwain
    3/1/19

    Liked by 2 people

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Travis – Some great thoughts and feedback on “the camera.” You have already have an understanding of how the framing and angle can assist in telling a story, Hold onto that and continue to dive deeper.

      Yes, Award’s season is about reminding and refreshing voters of the impact of Drama. For this year’s Oscar race for best film -seven out of the eight films were releases after August; only Black Panther was released earlier.

      “Atomic Blond” played heavily on color theory -great example. Towward’s the end of Red vs. Blue: Season 10, Episode 20 you’ll see the grey/black color theory come into play (ominous, trouble ahead).

      Thanks for you thoughtful responses Travis -NTMII

      Like

  17. mzod21 says:

    4.After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.
    The most recent film i’ve seen is silence of the lambs the color scheme used in this film were dark and light greys or either pitch black darkness as well as some dim or bright lights. These colors throughout the movie had their own affects the greys to make certain scenes look dark dingy or worn as well as suspicious. The pitch black areas have meant danger as well as something being hidden within it for example whe Buffalo Bill used the darkness to hide from Clarice which all in all mixed that sense of danger with something hidden. These colors helped encentuate the story even more showing clues and such and it adds a dramatic effect as well all the from Dr.lecter’s cell being a solitary grey dingy cell to Buffalo Bills underground hiding spot having a lot of darkness but in the end of that scene when Clarice managed to kill him the room filled with light and clarity the problem being resolved a victory.

    1.Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    First of all I barely even knew about all of these framing techniques and what they showed or represented one or two I may have recognized like the POV and the high right angle but, the others I barely had a clue this will help me to critique films because. Each angle means something in what the DP wants to convey with that certain angle either a certain feeling of suspense or a visual that deepens a meaning in the scene. This is important because without this the movie may become wayyyyyy less interesting and it’ll just be solid straightforward imagery that adds no dramatic affect to itself or does not give or emphasise key details like the space location emotion etc.

    3.After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”
    what had surprised me is that the movies that have reigned supreme are adaptations but, I do understand especially if the written version was widely popular. For example the Twilight series as well as Outlander a tv show but, they both had a huge series of books to begin with and seeing that popularity filmmakers took the chance and made these as accurate visual representations as possible. Gaining a huge profit even though I will say that original films are just as good but they don’t have that background popularity that some other films had whether it be historical events or books were written.

    -Melanie degree
    3/1/2019

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Melanie -Excellent understanding of color theory with Silence of the Lambs. Did you see any colors that offered elements of hope in that film?

      For your next review, you’ll put your understanding of camera and color theory into action. Go back and visit this if you need to.

      Adaptations reign supreme and I don’t think that will change at the box office; I think television has more opportunities for originality because of what you can do with expanding character arc.

      NTMII

      Like

  18. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    When i read this, i went into it not knowing much about the work of the camera. I mean I can take good pictures on a high quality camera. I do know a little bit about scenery and lighting but that’s about it. So when it talked about angels and getting the right shot it helped me gain a better understanding.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama Reality and Documentary”, and “Evaluating Remakes and sequels” choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”
    I really liked reading about the adaptations. A lot of the movies out right now is some sort of adaptation from another movie or book. They are always different though. Keeping in ind the two movies/books are two different things. So when reviewing them it is always good to momentarily forget about the other.

    After Exploring “color theory” in this chapter name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.
    One of the most recent films i engaged in was Scooby Doo 2. I watch a lot of kid movies because I babysit kids. But in this film there are a lot of mixtures of colors. When there is a “scary scene” the gang always wears bright colors so i to me it signifies that they are the positive solution to the issue.
    -Rayna Chichester

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rayna Chichester – For your next film review you’ll need to pay special attention to color theory and camera framing, movement choices and angles. – NTMII

      Like

  19. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    I found out that cameramen and directors have to find the perfect angle to express what they are trying to show, imagine your favorite movies, but from a birds-eye view. That wouldn’t be the best movie, would it? Perspective changes everything and you have to pay attention too what would make thing better and what did they do good or bad, try and think about what went through their mind before critiquing the movie, elaborate and decide why they chose the angle they did, it could make all the difference! Because it made a difference to them, it changes the way the movie played out, different things are expected to happen when the perspective is changed, even the camera you use could change the way the viewer sees the film, emotions are shown through the camera, tight spaces normally tense things up, the tighter the image, the more tense it is, the more open and free the camera is: the more relaxed the film becomes, (not in all film of course but the main idea stays)

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    Rebooting and sequels seemed the most intriguing to me as I’ve always loved them and I know they flow with the story and all yet this lets you know so much more, it allows you to dwell into how they make remakes, reboots, and sequels. Of course they make it for the money but I like it when they remake old movies because it adapts to current technology and lifestyle and the movie itself normally has better quality and draws a lot more attention than the old one did, I also find it interesting that waiting five years before a sequel makes the film produce more profit at the box office, because most people want the next movie as soon as possible!

    After exploring color theory in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    One of the most recent films I rewatched was “It”, which mostly used a grayscale brown throughout most scenes, as most of the movie itself was pretty dark, the gray reflected on the sadness felt by the characters and the fear and the brown kind of led to the natural and the mysteries genre of the film, as the black led to the darkness of the places the plot was directed and the death that was represented throughout the movie, most of the color was in the balloons the clown had as red represented hate and bloodlust. Which the clown thrived on as well as fear.

    Jackson Mealing
    March 1st, 2019

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jackson – Your comment “Perspective changes everything ” hits it perfectly for the director of photography (and director). They are aware that changing camera angles, framing, movement of shots all play a major role in “audience interpretation” (or perspective).

      Color theory + “It” = Perfect representation. Nice work.

      NTMII

      Like

  20. blakepow says:

    1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why? The framing technique that I thought was the most helpful in film critiquing was filming the character. Like how a wide shot can capture the emotions being expressed. In Rocky a wide shot was used when Rocky Balboa got to the top of the stairs and was expressing the emotion of joy by jumping up and down, we could see this because of the wide shot. I feel this is really important for film critiquing because it helps us to see what the character is feeling. Some other important things that I learned about was the movement and action and the camera of a film. These are important because the movement captures the action of what the characters experience and this gives us something to spice up the story. A good camera captures the quality of the action, this is important because it impacts the way we perceive the story and action.

    2. After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged. I watched light and shadow–the greatest cinematographers of the world, interviewed. The thing the intrigued me the most after watching this video was how the cinematographers talked about light and how it was your best friend, but also your enemy. It works with you and against you.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.” The thing that surprised and intrigued me the most about film adaptations was the part about how one page of script equals one minute of screentime. I always thought that directors went about refining the length of a movie differently. So it was interesting to find out how directors actually refine a movie’s length. It was amazing to me that the adaptation for a 544 page YA novel “Before I Fall” came out to be only an hour and 39 minutes long. It was surprising to me that someone could fit such a long story into such a short time frame.

    Like

  21. blakepow says:

    1. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why? The framing technique that I thought was the most helpful in film critiquing was filming the character. Like how a wide shot can capture the emotions being expressed. In Rocky a wide shot was used when Rocky Balboa got to the top of the stairs and was expressing the emotion of joy by jumping up and down, we could see this because of the wide shot. I feel this is really important for film critiquing because it helps us to see what the character is feeling. Some other important things that I learned about was the movement and action and the camera of a film. These are important because the movement captures the action of what the characters experience and this gives us something to spice up the story. A good camera captures the quality of the action, this is important because it impacts the way we perceive the story and action.

    2. After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged. I watched light and shadow–the greatest cinematographers of the world, interviewed. The thing the intrigued me the most after watching this video was how the cinematographers talked about light and how it was your best friend, but also your enemy. It works with you and against you.

    3. After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.” The thing that surprised and intrigued me the most about film adaptations was the part about how one page of script equals one minute of screentime. I always thought that directors went about refining the length of a movie differently. So it was interesting to find out how directors actually refine a movie’s length. It was amazing to me that the adaptation for a 544 page YA novel “Before I Fall” came out to be only an hour and 39 minutes long. It was surprising to me that someone could fit such a long story into such a short time frame.
    – Ethan Blake Powell

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Ethan Blake Powell – Adaptations are intriguing (especially when novels are translated to film). Filmmakers can’t adapt “every” element of the book (like “before I Fall”), so they pull what “they feel” are the highlights for the story. That’s why some fans of the original source materials HATE film versions -because everyone can interpret “the highlights” of the story differently. NTMII

      Like

  22. 1.Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    To me the most important filming technique is movement and action. I think that it is very important to have the right angle when filming to capture the scene with the best positioning. At first I thought that as long as u had it on camera it didn’t matter the angle now I know it makes a big difference in film.

    2.After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged.
    I listened to Tom Sigel and what I found most interesting was that when he was in highschool he had bought a camera and made films with his friends.He wanted to do even better so he took his brothers love for photography and made it his own.

    Like

  23. Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    To me all of the film techniques in this post were something new to me and I believe that the techniques that may help me out the most are the lost angle shot, point of view shots (below), and close up shots although I do believe that they are all important. The reason I say those are the most important and can help out in my criticism in film is because with these shots you can capture more in a clip in the film. It makes it more appealing to the viewers and emphasizes more on the story of the film so you can understand it better and have a better critic. For example in the film Green Book they did some close ups of the characters and we could see the emotions on their faces and understand more about how the character felt in the scene and sort of connect with it. I also learned about the changes of what they use to capture moments for example they created the crane which allowed them to get high angles for the scenes which they created during the creation of automobiles which gave them the idea and then later they started to use camera drones to help them out to get bird view shots which both have made great impacts in camera which I have learned and it helps the viewers sort of think about what type of techniques the crew and film makers use to get the shots.

    After engaging in the sections “Understanding Adaptations”, “Drama, Reality and Documentary,” and “Evaluating Remakes and Sequels”– choose one topic or element that surprised you, intrigued you, or that you feel will truly help you in your understanding of cinema critique. Always defend your answer with “why you feel that way.”

    Something that I believe that will help us in understand cinema critique was the main reasons Hollywood remakes films. I knew that one of the reasons was because of the profit in how much they made on the film and the feedback of the film. For example the original (or earlier version) is dated, the original was not widely well known, or beloved, or the original is not well-known to US audiences, the remake brings something new to light while respecting the original, or the original was cheesy, or hasn’t held up to the times. This can help me out in criticizing films because when reviewing a film it might be a remake and we can view the difference and why the film maker might have made a remake and understand the story of the film more.

    After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    A recent film that I have watched was the Green Book and in one scene Dr. Shirley was in his hotel room and it was a sort of dark in the room he was looking at his bruises and he was crying he was sad. The color of the clip was was to symbolize and represent the feelings that Dr. Shirley was keeping to himself and the viewers were now able to see it. Understanding the color themes helps us viewers understand the intent of the film maker/director because with the colors meanings we will know what the actor is feeling and how we should view the clip like sad, love, mysterious, passion, envy, etc.

    -Marleny Martinez
    3/1/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Good examples from Green Book -thanks for sharing. You’ll find the camera and color theory helpful as you dive into your next review. NTMII

      Like

  24. 1.Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?
    To me the most important filming technique is movement and action. I think that it is very important to have the right angle when filming to capture the scene with the best positioning. At first I thought that as long as u had it on camera it didn’t matter the angle now I know it makes a big difference in film.

    2.After engaging in section titled “Cinematographers tell their Story” – describe what impressed (or intrigued you) the most after watching or listening to one of the award-winning cinematographers. You must identify which cinematographer or video/audio file you engaged.
    I listened to Tom Sigel and what I found most interesting was that when he was in highschool he had bought a camera and made films with his friends.He wanted to do even better so he took his brothers love for photography and made it his own.

    4. After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.
    One of the movies I have recently watched is Avengers Infinity Wars and when they were traveling through space I saw too many colors to count They looked very nice This also happened to be one of my favorite scenes during the movie.

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      JAHSEIMMERRITT (no name listed at end of post) – I’d like more details from you on camera -which angle-shots most interested you? Also, I’m not sure I understand your color theory example from Avengers? How did that tie to the lesson on color theory? How did it serve as a representation?
      You’ll need to understand these in depth for your next review. NTMII

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  25. Josh Rubino says:

    1.Based on the reading of “The Camera” what framing techniques did you discover (or rediscover) that may help you the most in critiquing films. Offer an example. What else did you gain from that reading that you feel is important? Why?

    I just discovered all the framing techniques, I did not know that each shot had a name like extreme wide shot, wide shot, medium shot, medium long shot, etc. I think that the extreme wide shot will help me critique films because you get to see more of the setting and where the story is taking place. Also you might be able to see more characters. I gained knowledge knowing that the DP and the director have to come together to make the movie great and all the angles I did not know that existed because I did not look at movies in that aspect. This will help me look at movies more up close.

    4.After exploring “color theory” in this chapter, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify the color-scheme that was used (throughout the film or in a particular scene) and explain what the color represented. How will understanding the use of color-themes in film help you understand the filmmakers/director’s intent.

    I just recently watched the Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse, I could say that it had all the color schemes because some in the movie was it was dark and sad and the other parts were happy and full of confidence. It will help by knowing what each of those colors mean, it will help by knowing what the mood and tone of the movie is.

    -Josh Rubino

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh -Understanding the color theory and camera choices will come into play for your next review. You’ll probably want to revisit this chapter. I’d really like for you to provide examples from Spiderverse. You only answered two questions -the assignment was for three. – NTMII

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