(Ch. 2) Response Assignment (due Feb. 22)

Chapter 2 Assignment for the Film Critic:

Read and engage in materials from chapter 2 listed below:

A. The timeline on Film History 101 linked at the bottom of that page: 

B. The Five Stages of Filmmaking.

C. How We Watch Films

D. Explore Careers in Filmmaking

E. Film Theory Introduction

*After engaging in all materials and listening to the interview with Charlotte Observer film critic Lawrence Toppman, answer three of the following questions in the comments section below:

**NOTE: If you address exactly what another student does, you must expand on those thoughts.

  1. What did you find most interesting about film critic Larry Toppman (his advice or his perspective on viewing and review films)? Why? How do you think that will help you in your approach to film criticism? If you repeat what someone else has already written, you must expand on those thoughts.
  2. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
  3.  Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
  4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
  5. Based on this chapter,  which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.
    auteur

Bonus question for consideration and dialogue next week (this is for extra credit): Which crew position did you learn the most about (or did you enjoy learning about) from exploring the responsibilities? What was interesting about that position?

*Please post your responses at the bottom of this page before 11:59 pm on Feb. 22.

48 Comments Add yours

  1. 1. What did you find most interesting about film critic Larry Toppman (his advice or his perspective on viewing and review films)? Why? How do you think that will help you in your approach to film criticism? If you repeat what someone else has already written, you must expand on those thoughts.

    What I found the most interesting about film critic Larry Toppman was why he decided to look at movies more in depth rather than just entertainment. Mr. Toppman grew up in a small farmer town in New Jersey where they did not have a theater. He grew up not knowing much about films and he wanted to change that. I personally come from the small town of Lawndale North Carolina. This made me think that I can do great things if I try hard enough. Maybe one day I could be a film critic just like Mr. Toppman.

    2. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline?Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I have heard of picture shows but now I know what that actually means. The thing that I found most interesting was the way that film view has changed. It went from showing a singular picture every couple of minutes to a Praxinoscope This device made a picture look like it was in motion. Then we had the first film “The Horse In Motion ”. Then the The Kinetoscope was invented, this device could put sound with pictures but it could not be synchronized. The first nationwide television network was NBC in 1951. In 2005 everybody could be a filmmaker due to YouTube.

    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I feel that the development stage is the most important. During this stage is where the story is found, fundraising happens if necessary, the cast is approached, locations are scouted and the director is hired. If none of this happen there would be no move at all. To have a film you have to go through the development stage.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Excellent Feedback Dylan. Noel Manning

      Like

  2. 2. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    Based on Film History 101, I believe that the original creation of the industry of films, such as the display of machines such as the kinetoscope, which attempted to correlate sound and image, was the most interesting. The people that first created the industry may not have known it at first but they would create a multi-million, if not billion, dollar industry of today’s world, which is revolutionalized through some projection of films. Today’s world would not be the same without the first creation and display of the first films, which showed art as well as forms of entertainment. This creation of film spawned an art form as well as a method of entertainment.

    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    Based on The Five Stages of Filmmaking, I believe that the development stage is the most important because it forms the future of the film being created. Development includes the idea stage, which formulates the outline of a story as well as fundraising, the director being selected and hired, the key cast and crew being approached, the shooting blueprint is outlined, and locations for filming are scouted. These stages allow the introduction of the story, which originally portrays the probability of success, financial and otherwise. Without this stage, essentially nothing would be planned, which is key in creating any form of art or entertainment.

    5. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how? Defend your answer.

    Based on Theory and Practice, I most subscribe to the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory, which is based upon the union of every piece of the creation of the film. For example, if there is an underperforming director but with an excellent rest of the members who are creating the film, the film may do mediocre and the director may be somewhat criticized. As I consider film criticism, I believe that the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory is the most effective method of determining the success of a film but, film critics are not the one that determines the success of a film, the audience does. Although possibly subject to change, I do not believe that the possibility that my viewpoint in this topic will change in the near future throughout my film criticism career. I do not believe that my view will change because I currently believe that this method of determining success by the film critic is the most appropriate. Through the union of all parts of the creation of a film and the final viewpoints upon the film, one can have the ability to view a film how it was made.
    – Nathanael Leclercq

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Bonus:
      Which crew position did you learn the most about (or did you enjoy learning about) from exploring the responsibilities? What was interesting about that position?

      The crew position that I most enjoyed learning about from exploring the responsibilities is the key grip. The key grip is the head of a group of grips which produce the equipment necessary for effective and appropriate visuals to be taken through cameras and the like. This position essentially creates and implements the product of rigging and equipment that the director of photography (DP) uses, which is often a crucial role in the taking of the raw film before editing. The key grip also works closely with the gaffer, who is responsible for effective and appropriate lighting. This relationship allows the key grip to expand their ability of production or implementation of equipment to also involve light fixtures and other technology along with dolly tracks, scaffolds, etc. To me, without proper equipment, a film has only a set ability to have greatness within.
      – Nathanael Leclercq, 2-22-2019

      Like

    2. noeltmanning says:

      Nathanael Leclercq – Thank you for your feedback. I am more in line with the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory. Noel T. Manning II

      Like

  3. Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    I think the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking was in the 1950s when television created big competition for the theater industry and I think that is one of the biggest things that have fueled the movie industry and created the motivation for a lot of the innovations made in the movie making industry. When movies were able to be viewed at home on cable and HBO that took away a great amount of money from the theaters because people did not have to go spend money or leave their own home to get great entertainment on screen. Competition was boosted which caused theaters to become greater and greater along with the tvs in our own homes.
    Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    I think that the most important stage in the filmmaking process would be the Development because it is the foundation to the entire film. The success of the film is only as great as the planning and foundation of the film. If the planning is not right everything will all come tumbling down.
    Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.
    At this point I think I mainly agree with the Schreiber Theory because as I said in the previous question foundation is everything. It does not matter how great a director or cast you get if you do not have a good plan and foundation in the beginning the film is highly unlikely succeed. I think there is always a chance of change though the more experience you get the more point of views you see you could find a new perspective on things.
    -Caitlyn Hamrick

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      -Caitlyn Hamrick – Nice thoughts and feedback. Your perspective on the impact of “TV” on the film industry is a strong one. Noel Manning

      Like

  4. 2. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    What I found most interesting was the Praxinoscope. It was nothing like what we had today and it is what film used to be like. I was fascinated by how it worked and I also wonder how you can come up with something like this all the way back in 1877. I also liked how accurate the running horse was too real life and how I want to know how hard and how long it takes to build something that good.

    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I feel the most important part in the filmmaking process is the post-production because I have always had a part in me for editing and if you do not have a good editor the film will make little to no sense if it is not done correctly. This can also be a stressful time for the editor because (s)he has to please everyone, even the audience as best to his ability so they can have a good rating and make a profit.

    5. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how? Defend your answer.

    I most subscribe to The Symphonic Puzzle Theory as I consider film criticism because I feel that not one pure thing or someone can make a film good or bad. Many things can sway how a movie is created, published, and produced instead of it only being the director’s, or editor’s fault even though they are crucial to every film. I do not feel that my opinion will change because it will allow me to better analyze multiple parts of the film without singling out, for example, the director and ignoring the editor because both play a major part in the producing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Forgot to put my name at the bottom.
      -Dylan Swofford

      Liked by 1 person

    2. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan Swofford – I have always been a fan of editing; actually one of my jobs during college was serving as an editor. When I began that, it gave me a much deeper appreciation of it …. and its importance. Noel Manning

      Like

  5. sugarymango says:

    Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail

    ~ I feel like television in the 1950s has been the most important because it was when people started to be able to watch things at home, it also helped with the creation of TV shows. (I mean it’s in the name though.) Movies also would be able to be shown. Even though TVs were expensive, (and most families had one if any.) it was a popular invention. Now everyone has TVs maybe even more than two. And people can watch movies, shows, sports, etc on it. Even though you can now do things online or on your phone, TV shaped a lot of what we see today. I mean, once a movie comes out, I can eventually watch it at home, without getting off the couch.

    Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    ~ The most interesting to me would probably be production stage. It’s where you get to film, use sound, and actually get to execute the “plan”. I think this is the most interesting part because you get to start messing around with things (effects, sound, etc) and I love to create things. The most important part would probably be Post production or Exhibition and Distribution. Some would argue that it would be the beginning stage but I think it is these two things because the post production is the final chance you get before you send it out. It’s where everything is edited and there is one final look at it, for any mistakes or possible redos. The exhibition and distribution stage is important too because it is when you see the final outcome and what you can do better (in hopefully most cases or you go bankrupt) and how the crowd is influenced. Basically this stage gives you the feedback. I think all of the parts are important in their own way. But the post production is definitely important.

    Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how? Defend your answer

    ~ I think I would probably go with the Schreiber Theory. (It’s when a movie’s success or failure depends on the screenwriter.) I think I identify with this one the most because if I read a story, how much I like the story depends on how well the writer writes. If they write something like: “the dog chases the red ball.” I’m going to get bored. So in a movie, the person will write the script, if it is the same as a boring story, I’m not going to watch it. But there are many great screenwriters out there so of course if I watch what they’ve come up with, I’m not going to get bored. I think my views might change slightly, but if you think about who’s fault a bad movie is, most likely it would be the screenwriter, special effects,etc.

    ~Lucy Holland~

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Nice feedback Lucy – I agree with your “the dog chases the red ball” script concept … that would be boring. 🙂
      Nice understanding of the “stages of filmmaking” too.
      Thank you Lucy – Noel Manning

      Like

  6. petertuong says:

    2.Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    What I found the most interesting in the history timeline was that there was a process to get color in films very early on such as in 1916 but for many years later black and white films were still more popular, I found this interesting because now color films are the norm and popular. Because now when you watch a movie or someone tells you they watched a movie you assume it is a color film and not a black and white one but back then it could’ve been the opposite. So that interest me and left me to wonder why the focus changed and why it didn’t change earlier.

    4.Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    In my opinion I think that the post production is the most important part, like the post said this stage has very important parts such as editing and puts all the parts together. Without post production the movie could be scrambled and the pacing, lighting, and sound of the entire film can be put off. The jobs in the post production stage can affect the whole film and how the tone is or the sequence goes.

    5.Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.

    The film theory I feel subscribed to is the Symphonic-Puzzle theory, even though I believe some roles are more important than others I still believe that they are all vital to the film and how well it is. I don’t think that i will change to another theory because criticizing a film makes you look at all the jobs and details which is practicing the Symphonic-Puzzle theory

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Peter – Yes, it is pretty amazing that even in those early years of cinema, they were always trying to do more and expand the audiences interactions. Don’t forget to add your name to your post in the future. Noel Manning

      Like

  7. Faith Ramsey says:

    Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I think the most interesting part was the little animated video. We don’t really see those often because of the way technology and entertainment has developed. It was very different, by the way the characters continued to change into other characters.

    2. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    Post production because it is when the special effects are added. I feel like special effect just give it the pop of action or horror people are looking for. Example when people are shooting an action scene, people cant to all the flips and trick in real life so they use special effects. In post production they also do the sound mix. I think this part is interesting as well because they use different items to sound like bones breaking or horse hooves.

    3. Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I feel like it was in 1937 when snow white played. After snow white many other movies began to play in theaters. So that started to get more people to go to the movies. Which meant more business. More business caused for the theatres to continue to upgrade. Two years later two more films was played in theaters and they had upgraded to color.

    Bonus.
    Which crew position did you learn the most about (or did you enjoy learning about) from exploring the responsibilities? What was interesting about that position?

    To me foley artist sounds the most interesting.It didn’t say much about them but I know that they have to take ordinary everyday objects and somehow make sounds like cracking bones or gunshots or even horse hooves. It would definitely be a difficult job but i feel like it would be fun. If a movie didn’t have a foley artist, the movie would be quite boring. The sound brings everything together in my opinion.

    Faith Ramsey

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Faith – You’ll learn more about the foley artist in a future chapter; I think you’ll be fascinated. For clarification, Snow White made an impact on the “animated world” – and more so on the “children’s audience” than anything else. Theatre was still in its toddler years in 1937, but film goers would always go see the latest film in masses (even before 1937). Thanks Faith -Noel Manning

      Like

  8. jmcmullens2 says:

    2) Based on this chapter, What did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    -The thing that i found most interesting to me while i was looking at the time line was that movies were a thing back in the 1800’s. I did not know that movies dated back that far. When i thought of Birth of a Nation i always thought of the newer movie. The way that movies were also created has changed. The way that movies went from a picture that was stationary for a period of time to images that were able to move. This was all because of the advance in technology which is when the praxinoscope was created and created these moving images. I think that this is interesting because all of the movies i have heard of or saw was moving images or live action. I never would have thought that movies went back to the 1800 or that there were some still images and that’s how they watched movies. I also found that some movies were like an optical illusion i could not watch the video however i found the idea of it interesting.

    4)Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    -While reading this chapter about the stages of filmmaking i find that the post production stage is the most important stage. I say this because this is the stage where the editors come together to take the clips from the production and make it into the movie. Post production is interesting to me also because they have to know how to do all of these things such as taking images video clips and other things and put them together in a certain order. That does not include if they were to have to go back and reshoot something and special effects if needed. It seems difficult to know what to do and also how they would know how to do it. This job in general amazes me overall. Thinking back to the movie Space Jam the post production had to be on point because of the switch from real to animated and plus some of the special effects that they have in the movie. In addition this is the stage where you can see where you go wrong and fix them so that your movie can be possibly successful which is something that is important to whoever is producing the movie.
    5)Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.
    -At this moment i believe that the film theory i most subscribe to would be the Schreiber Theory. I believe this because when it comes to analyzing film i believe that the script is what everything is built around and what can make the movie be successful or not. As time goes on i do believe that this theory will not be for me anymore and Symphonic- Puzzle Theory will be. I believe this because in this theory you look at everything and piece it together before deciding if it is good or bad. Here lately i have been doing this for some movies. I look at many things besides just the script such as how the characters develop and the simple details such as their costumes and how it added to the overall effect. For example as i was watching The Body on Hulu there is a certain part where the heistmans want to be lover costume adds to the overall effect of what he had done to her at a certain scene in the movie. It showed background and without even watching the entire movie you can know just by her costume where she came from and how she was dressed previously. Which adds that curious effect to know how she knew where the heistman was when he left her in that scene. Besides that i also put the script with the characters to see of there is a real development within the character and not just because i know it will eventually come because most scripts have that change. he actor has to make it believable in order for the movie to have some type of interest or meaning.
    -Jada McMullens 02-21-19

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jada McMullens – Yes, it is truly amazing how old Cinema is -but it is the technology that continues to impact and cause change (and advancements). As you look at the post-production stage of filmmaking, that’s when/where you can find technologies greatest advancements (special visual effects, sound fx, computers, etc.). The journey of filmmaking will continue to expand and grow. Noel Manning

      Like

  9. zachbaynard says:

    Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    When looking at the timeline as a whole, I think what stood out the most wasn’t just a single particular event. Sure “The Wizard of Oz” may have been game changing being in color, but I think it’s the overall evolution of film that interest me the most. We went from black and white movies and quiet movies to colored movies and movies with sound and music. It also struck me that this wasn’t too long ago. “To Kill a Mockingbird” had only black and white color (but still had sound) and was released back in the 1960’s, which was 50 years ago.

    Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I think the most important historical aspect of technology in filmmaking has to be when Netflix was made. Netflix lets you access most movies and TV shows for only a membership fee. You didn’t have to pay for a movie or walk to the nearest video store just to get a movie, you could just turn on your TV and go to netflix. Netflix just makes movies more convenient and easier to watch. You also don’t have to worry about turning the movie in the next day, rather you can watch as many movies as you want to as long as you have a membership.

    Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    After reading, I think the most important part of filmmaking is the editing. Editors have an extremely important role of taking all of the small clips and turning them into a movie. They also have the important job to add special effects to make the movie more appealing to the audience. I don’t think much of anyone would really enjoy films without the editors, as they just make the movie experience so much better.

    -Zach Baynard

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zach -Thanks for your comments. Before Netflix streaming services, they would mail DVDs to people’s homes (they still do), that was the real game-changer for video stores (and actually caused many to close their doors). The streaming was an after thought. Noel Manning

      Like

  10. 3. Based on the chapter what do you feel has been the important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why?
    I believe that the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking was in 1997 Netflix was launched. The reason I say this it is because it started with just dvd’s being mailed but later they started to have movies and shows on the internet making millions of dollars. They started to make good money that they eventually put blockbuster video and many other video stores out of business. Many people pay to use Netflix and it is becoming a big platform on the internet so it was a big change in filmmaking and it still is making big changes in filmmaking.

    4.Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    I believe that the most important and interesting stage of the filmmaking process is distribution and exhibition. The reason is because after someone has decided to make a film and makes it it depends on this stage because they have to advertise it to everyone through trailers, posters, billboard, and more to make it look pleasing to everyone else so that they can watch the film. So now they are relying on the people to choose whether they are going to watch and if they are going to like the film and if they are going to reach the amount of money they need to announce that they film was a success. They are then going to make merchandise and things to sell to the audience to make even more money to gain for what they had used when making the film they. Although if the film is not a success then the filmmaker would have lost a ton of their money on the film and their career would hit rock bottom. So the film really depends on this last stage of the filmmaking process.

    5. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how? Defend your answer.
    The film theory that I most subscribe to is The Schreiber Theory as a consider film criticism. I believe that it may change my viewpoint as I engage in more film criticism. The theory explains that the script of the film is the foundation of the entire film and I believe that it is true that it is the script that is the most important thing about the film. So when I start reviewing films now and later I should start to focus more on the script the story of the film because the script is mostly just the entire film and that is something important to look at if I want to give a good opinionated review.

    -Marleny Martinez

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Marleny Martinez – Manu of you in the course have focused on the Schreiber Theory; without the foundation of a good script (story) nothing else matters.

      The distribution and exhibition stage os the reason that filmmakers put so much time and effort into films … so their works can be seen and experienced.

      Thanks -Noel Manning

      Like

  11. katiecstone says:

    1. What did you find most interesting about film critic Larry Toppman (his advice or his perspective on viewing and review films)? Why? How do you think that will help you in your approach to film criticism?

    During the podcast, Larry brought up that he likes a movie to “take me somewhere I’ve never been.”, I found this approach to be very interesting and insightful. He explains that the “new” approach to the movie can either be through a twist ending or, if the film is based off of a book/work that has a set plot, it can be through expanding upon characters in a way that has not been done before; allowing the viewer to experience them, and the story, in a different light. In this moment, I realized that Larry had just described something that I have always had trouble putting into words. His idea that a film should take you somewhere you have never been before is so powerful, and I think that this will factor into how I view films, especially remakes, from now on.

    2. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how? Defend your answer.

    At this point, I am pretty set on the Auteur Theory. Here is why: the Schreiber Theory has a solid basis, but even when the script is poorly written, there are still so many levels it has to go through (director, actors, editor), that you cannot possibly think the script will be the same, or even interpreted to be identical to the screenwriter’s initial copy that you are placing the full blame on. The Auteur Theory, however, leaves the blame fully to the director. While it seems unreasonable, when you consider that the director is practically in charge of the entire production, it is sane for you to contribute the failure to them. If I am watching a film and I love everything but the music, I am not going to blame every person who contributed to the film as the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory does, I am going to blame the director who told the sound engineer to place that audio clip or piece of poorly arranged music in that moment.

    3. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I think my favorite filmmaking stage to learn about was the Development stage. It baffles me just how many factors go into this part, it involves so much more than just writing the script. It includes forming the story, fundraising, selecting a director, approaching a cast and crew, outlining a shooting blueprint, and scouting out locations to film. In my opinion, this is the most critical stage, because even though the story is not being captured yet, decisions are being made about how it will be told and who gets to tell it, which are two factors that could either make or break it.

    Bonus:
    4. Which crew position did you learn the most about (or did you enjoy learning about) from exploring the responsibilities? What was interesting about that position?

    I had three crew positions that I loved learning about: Foley Artist, The Best Boy, and Key Grip. I have watched a lot of videos on how Foley Artists do their work and I have always found it fascinating. How they recreate an everyday sound with lettuce, PLUS, how they time it out so precisely is beyond me. I had never heard of the position of the Best Boy until reading this, so it was fun to learn about his role. The Key Grip was also a new crew term for me. I figured that the lighting technician did all of the rigging, but understanding that a whole separate entity is involved in doing that was interesting.

    – Katherine Stone 2/21/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Katherine Stone – I’m so happy that Larry Toppman was able to connect with you by finding a way to put into words that experience of being “taking away” to other places, other worlds.

      Interesting insights into the different theories, thanks for sharing.

      As we explore the different stages of filmmaking, I agree that it is really important to appreciate “all the work” that goes on behind the scenes. It truly is a massive undertaking (from start to finish). Just sit and watch the credits when a film ends.

      Thanks for diving into the bonus question -you’ll get extra points for this. We’ll dive into sound design and score in a future lesson, and Foley will be a component of that as well.

      Nice job Miss Stone. – Noel Manning

      Like

  12. travismc88 says:

    What did you find most interesting about Lawrence (Larry) Toppman and Why? How does this one think it will help in one’s approach to film criticism?

    Ole Larry should definitely be respected. First of all: 37 years as of this interview reviewing Films. You could hear the respect dripping from Noel’s voice at his follow up questions and responses, Noel must have got formally started nearly a decade later. All deserved respect of course. He laid down the simple structure of questions to ask from a movie that Noel has also displayed to us: “Did the Film hit it’s target? Was that target worth shooting for? Does the film exist within the rules it has set up? What’s the filmmaker’s agenda?” The final question being one this One often looks for, being a fan of Auteur filmmakers such as Lynch. Such thoughts as the target being worth while is something I don’t tend to consider. Though, I intend to use these questions going further.

    Based on this Chapter, what does this one feel has been the most important aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking and why?

    From this one’s personal insight. The discovery of how to sync sound to film would be the first major innovation. From their you shift from the major vaudevillian-esque acts, such as my personal idle Buster Keaton and other silent acts like Charlie Chaplin, to films like “the Jazz Singer” and the like. Performers that worked great in the silent era didn’t work out so good for the “talkies.” Musicals seemed to be the heavy hitters from what I’ve found in my research. I imagine it was because that was the closest to the silent films style and people could focus on the choreography and score. Dialogue became more important as things went on. Same thoughts on 3-D. Back when it was a fad to draw people to the theaters away from the Television in order to compete. When proper 3-D was utilized in contemporary Films., they used it differently by adding depth to the screen instead of having things ”pop” out at the viewer. It sucked the viewer in which is what any film maker wants all together: to engulf the viewer. Sound engulfed the viewer by not just having to rely on Visual storytelling and reading dialogue cards. Not all film makers were as talented as the likes of Keaton as far as telling a story, keeping attention, through only the images and action shown. However, he was a master…

    Based on this chapter, which Stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important and why?

    I would say the production phase would be my favorite part but as far as interesting goes I’ll have to go with Development. Mainly the casting process fascinates me. Selecting the characters the writer visualized, that takes a talented individual. “Casting By” is this great documentary I saw back in 2013 when it came out: It was about Marion Dougherty who had been a prolific Casting Director giving many Hollywood stars their first acting credits. Actors such as Clint Eastwood, Al Pacino, Jon Voight, Dustin Hoffman all were first discovered by Marion. Eastwood, Woody Allen and more all rallied to try and get the Academy to give her an honorary Oscar for her work. Sadly it never came to pass. But getting all the pieces of the Filmmaking puzzle ready interests me. As well as the marketing of a movie but that’s not part of the development phase.

    Travis A McIlwain
    2/22/19

    Liked by 2 people

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Travis -Wonderful insights and depth here; thanks for sharing. Thanks for bringing up the doc “Casting by” ; that’s actually one I haven’t seen but plan to check out. I really appreciate your input in these dialogue sections -keep it up. -Noel Manning

      Liked by 1 person

      1. travismc88 says:

        I highly recommend you watch Casting By as soon as you can. It’s not exactly what you think it’s going to be either.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. jscism5 says:

    2. The part that I found most interesting about the film history is how early it began. I never thought of film history starting in the early 19th century. I was always under the impression that film started around the time Charlie Chaplin was in his 20s or 30s but he wasn’t even born until almost 60 years after film history had begun. I had always known that the first films were made by a bunch of pictures being scrolled through quickly but this is the first time I have ever seen something such as the “praxinoscope”. I just think it’s very interesting to see where film making started and how far it’s come.
    4. I think the most interesting and important part of film making is pre-production. I feel like this is really where the film first starts to come together and you really have an idea of what the film is going to be. This is where every film begins and you have to start out the right way if you want the film to be successful. In my opinion the storyline is the most important part of the film, you can have good acting and a mesmerizing set but if the story doesn’t entertain then your film isn’t really a success. Pre-production is where your story starts to develop and you have a good idea of what the film is going to be and that’s why I think it is the most important part.
    5. I think I agree with the Schreiber theory the most. I feel the script and screenwriting is the most important part of a film, without it your film really has no point. I have always judged a movie based on how well it told a story and whether it kept me entertained. I feel as I try to become a better film critic I will try and transition more towards the the symphonic-puzzle theory. I think this is the most fair way to judge a film. It puts everything on equal ground and doesn’t focus on one part of a film being more important than others.

    Josh Scism
    2/22/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh – It is amazing how far film history goes back (before Chaplin); But Chaplin’s impact on cinema is pretty incredible. He found success as an actor, writer, composer, producer and studio owner.

      Many of you are drawn to the “script” aspect of evaluation … and importance.

      Thanks for sharing – Noel Manning

      Like

  14. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    The thing that I found most surprising is that a movie with sound was actually made before an animations with synchronized sound. Even though they had fifty-one years to make a movie with sound and thirty-seven years to make an animation (since the first time they made it with sound) with synchronized sound, it seems like it would taken at least ten or twenty years to make synchronized sound considering animation was made before the first “film”

    Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I feel like the most important/interesting stage is post production. During post production they edit the film and this is important because if they didn’t the movie would be a mess and there would be a whole bunch of scenes scrambled within the film and that would make it seem hard to know what’s going on and they add special effects which if they didn’t have that then the movie would lose an important aspect.

    Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I feel like television in the 1950s was most important because people didn’t have to go watch movies at a theater, they could just stay home. I also feel like it was a bigger challenge for film creators and TV creators, because it seems like it would be harder making something show through a screen rather than a projector. At the theaters, you’d watch movies that came through a projector and were projected onto a big screen, but with TVs a signal or something would have to be transmitted, which would also allow the show to be played somehow. This is important because it caused films to be able to be watched at home (which more people are likely to do rather than going to a theater). It also allowed the creation of TV shows which would be watched at home rather than going to a theatre every week for a thirty or so minute episode of a show. This also led to many things like Showtime, HBO, and others being made, which made films many accessible.

    – Rileah Graham

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rileah Graham – They were able to record sound pretty early on in cinema, but finding the technology to sync it with the moving images was a challenge.

      The post-production stage is really like making sure all the puzzle pieces fit. I too appreciate that stage (as a former editor myself).

      Thanks Noel Manning

      Like

  15. mzod21 says:

    2. What I found most interesting about the film history timeline the video along with website showed the advancements in film. In the video showed charlie chaplin the king of the “silent movie” era and in the timeline website showing that not one person started the whole moving picture business it went from thomas edison to the lumiere brothers, even if the dialogue in the moving pictures wasn’t fully synchronized it was still a great advancement that didn’t just stay in the USA it spread to Europe to places such as Russia and scandinavia. This was mind blowing to the public the more people that paid to go watch films cause it to rise in great popularity studios and establishments being built but, the first world war put a kink in the system causing film to be limited. Aside from that the addition of color sound being brought us the black and white tinges of color then technicolor and in sound it was a bit of a struggle sync discs being made but this method resulted badly so, it was removed and replaced by a density soundtrack recorded along the side of the film. The beginning is what always interested me in film the struggles the competition and the lengthy processes to get to where it is today.

    4. The stage that I feel is the most important/Interesting is the production sure the script the pre production and all are just as important but, I feel that when is the actual stage of production if you want an amazing film that will get you an oscar you need to have the crew, the cast, the lights and the action. Not to mention the budget each shoot counting on the movies budget whether its for CGI effects or sets, as well as hiring the actors it’s a crucial asset to the production making process and to be executed as best as possible within the quota and budget given without all this even if you have the best script ever you need the right actors the right directors/ producers it can’t just be anyone when you take the screenplay into consideration everything could be at stake and not just actor wise special effects come into play. As well as editing lighting and sound every small detail is crucial to the production no matter how many castings you have to go through to find an actor for one character the execution is key. Some movies have ignored this fact and end up being what I like to call a big blob of bleh that isn’t worth your money to watch. Even if the trailer shows you this amazing movie with top notch quality and it has you hyped for months weeks or even years no one would want to go through that and end up paying money to see garbage.

    5.At this point the film theory I subscribe to most is the symphonic puzzle theory developed by pauline kael a film critic that believed that director was only a piece that determined whether a film was successful or not. That in reality it’s a bunch of different pieces that come together and make a cohesive product that means the script acting sound design cinematography sets and etc should all come together and thall determine the film’s success, if it doesn’t flow like it should or in better words fit with the other piece of the puzzle the film won’t have as much of a chance of succeeding. This theory is basically the same thought I have on a film that every part is crucial that if one piece is faulty or in the wrong place or it just doesn’t belong it can affect the film even if it’s just a minimal factor it still matters it isn’t all about the director even if you have the best director that doesn’t change the fact that you have horrible sets or god forbid horrible actors, see what I mean? just because you have one good thing doesn’t mean that the whole film will be success because only one piece of the puzzle was there. Honestly I don’t feel like this will change as my time with film criticisms goes by cause this theory has a lot of truthful points in which I can relate and agree on

    Melanie Degree

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Melanie Degree – Technology has had such a tremendous aspect on the filmmaking process (as you can see from this chapter); it truly is fascinating. It will continue to change and find its impact through technology.

      I’d encourage you to go back and examine the “stages of filmmaking” it is possible you may have a few of these confused (CGI, editing are normally really flushed out during the post-production stages).

      Noel Manning

      Like

  16. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I think the idea behind film-making itself was really interesting, and here is why! It seemed like so much of a stretch back then, the kinetoscope was such a breakthrough, and the kinetophone was even better even though the audio wasn’t there or it was out of sync, it was still such an innovation for their time, and honestly how did they come up with it? And then with the color recording and such, the innovation that inspired theatrical film is the most interesting thing about film itself! (To me at least!)

    Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    The introduction of streaming through Netflix, Hulu, Vudu, Roku and such, because going from projectors to films, to digital CD’s, to online streaming, that just such a big advancement and I feel it’s the biggest so far, the people wanted something new and the world and the people that made this happen worked their hardest towards it.

    Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    Production, without brainstorming ideas or having people try out for roles in the movie, it can’t be produced at all, effort has to be put in by the directors and the cast to be able to make a movie in the first place, everything needs to be set up and organized as a whole group and everybody needs to work in unison or there won’t be any movie to produce at all!

    – Jackson Mealing

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jackson – Thanks for your input on the historical components of filmmaking and technology. I’d really like to see you provide more depth to your thoughts on the production stage? Would you go back and take a look at that section and give more feedback? Noel Manning

      Like

  17. blakepow says:

    2. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail. The most interesting part about the film history timeline, to me, was that the first horror movies were being made in the 1920s, because I had thought that they were first being made more recently. The picture for the horror movie is also nothing like what I imagined the 1920s were producing. I thought that horror movies that were being made in the 1920s were not scary and really cheesy, but the picture changes my mind about that. Another interesting part about the timeline was scrolling through the actors that I had seen and have not seen and learning more about when these actors were really popular.
    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail. The stage of the filmmaking process that I found most interesting was the Post Production stage. This stage was the most interesting to me because it gave me an inside look on how hard it is to edit a movie’s mistakes to make it good. In this way it is also the most important stage because you could release a movie with a lot of mistakes and gain no profit from it because no one likes it.
    5. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer. I mostly subscribe to The Symphonic-Puzzle Theory at this point in film criticism. I do not think that this will change because I believe that everything is connected in making a good movie. While the other theories make sense this makes the most sense to me because it covers every situation, especially the situations where someone is to be blamed. While I do believe that the director is in charge of most of the movie, he is not in charge of all of it, and this is why The Auteur Theory does not work for me; it does not cover every situation like The Symphonic-Puzzle Theory does.
    – Ethan Blake Powell

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Ethan Blake Powell – Nosferatu from the 1920s was really a pretty creepy film (especially during the time period), and it was loosely based on Bram Stoker’s Dracula. There were actually tons of early horror films worth exploring. We’ll dive into horror later this semester. -Noel Manning

      Like

  18. 2.Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    The most interesting thing to me in the history timeline was that they had to go through a sort of process to make a film have color. In today’s world it is common for a film to have color but as I did a little research I found out that people used to make films without any color it just used to be black and white. This surprised me because I always thought that film was in color since film was created. This made me very curious.

    5. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.
    I believe that the main character’s role is more important than an average characters role but they somehow all connect to make something bigger as a film progresses. Whether it be a main characters role or a normal characters role their actions will still contribute to the film. So I think that the film theory that I subscribe to is the Symphonic-puzzle theory

    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    I think the post production is the most important part of a film because the passage said that this played an important role in filmmaking. It has editing in it this is the main reason why I think it is important. This is where a big part of the film itself is put together. If it were not for this step in filmmaking there would be all kinds of problems with the film such as the light the sound and what if the characters mess up while the cameras rolling if they did good overall in the specific scene then you would be able to edit it out. I believe this is essential to filmmaking.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      JAHSEIM MERRITT – Yes, early cinema was without color and without sound. Technology has impacted that. I’d like you to go back and explore the theory section once more to make sure you have a full understanding of the theories. Also, remember to add you name to each post. -Noel Manning

      Like

  19. 2.Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been more interesting about the film history line? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I like the idea of a big grand theater. It would be nice to walk into a theater and have soft red velvet seats, red carpet, gold embroidery. When we go into the movies now everything is super dark/black it’s not as much of a show anymore just a place to view a film.

    3.Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect audience/technology in film making? Which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is the most important/interesting? Why? Defend your answer.

    The use of better quality film materials. Personally, I am not one to like old movies because i don’t like the graphics or the camera quality. I like a crisp clean view of everything. Now that we have better editing materials we can make better quality work. I can not wait to see where the film industry goes next.

    4.Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how? Defend your answer.

    I lean more towards the Schreiber theory. If you have a poor screenwriter who isn’t very good you can’t expect a wonderful film to appear out of nowhere. The director must be able to rely on the script/screenwriter to perfect their vision.
    -Rayna Chichester

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rayna Chichester – Thanks for your feedback. Within 20 years when audiences look at many films produced in the 2010s they may feel the same way you do about today’s CGI graphics. Technology will continue to enhance cinema and audiences expectations.

      Thanks -Noel Manning

      Like

  20. noeltmanning says:

    Edward –
    1. What did you find most interesting about film critic Larry Toppman (his advice or his perspective on viewing and review films)? Why? How do you think that will help you in your approach to film criticism? If you repeat what someone else has already written, you must expand on those thoughts.
    I found it interesting that Larry Toppman grew up in a farming town in New Jersey because I am basically the exact opposite, growing up in New York City. The fact that he had almost no film experience until he moved into a bigger city and became a very good film critic and I grew up highly familiar with film and constantly watching movies makes me feel really good about my future as a film critic.
    3. Based on this chapter, what do you feel has been the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    I feel that the most important historical aspect of audience/technology in filmmaking is making popcorn available, because it laid the pathway for theaters to become an economic boom. If popcorn was never sold in theaters, there would never be snacks in theaters either, so theaters would never make a major amount of money.
    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    I believe that the most important stage of the filmmaking process is editing because it takes all of the nonsense that is all of the clips, and makes them into a cohesive story with a plotline. If the film wasn’t cohesive, people wouldn’t like the films, so they wouldn’t want to see them anymore, therefore making movies obsolete, and this assignment nonexistent.

    -Edward Velky

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks for your feedback Edward. It is difficult not to think of films today, without thinking about “Popcorn.” As a reminder, editing isn’t a stage -editing happens within the “post production” stage of filmmaking. -Noel Manning

      Like

  21. noeltmanning says:

    Jessica Randolph – Here is my Chapter two response, sorry that I submitted it late I was sick with the flu and I wasn’t able to do any work.

    Based on this chapter, which
    stage
    of the film making process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    I feel that Development is the most important stage because you have to have plan
    before any of the other stages can occur. If you went straight into Production then you would be unprepared and you would have wasted a lot of money. The storyboards and the main idea is the most important part of the film making process because nothing else
    can occur before it, the film wouldn’t be that good if you didn’t go in with an idea.

    Based on this chapter, which
    film
    theory
    do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage
    in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.

    The
    film theory that I am most subscribed to right now is the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory. If everything isn’t good then the movie will not be good, if you have the best director directing the movie but the actors are horrible then the movie could end up bad because
    the actors could not portray the right emotions. It seems like the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory is a mix of the Auteur Theory and the Schreiber Theory. I don’t think that my opinion will change as I engage in more film criticism, this theory seems like it’s the
    most accurate out of all of them.

    Based on this chapter, what did you find most
    interesting about the film
    history
    timeline?
    Why? Defend your answer in detail.

    It is so interesting how much film has evolved from when it first was discovered
    to now. Back when people first started making films it was in black and white and there was no sound. The movies were play on this projector and you had a huge roll of film that someone had to sit the booth and make sure the slides were right. Now most movies
    are in color and you most have sound, there are special effects and the movie runs by itself in the theater and no one has to sit on the booth and watch the film. Film is so different from when it first started and it’s so interesting to see how far it’s come
    over the years.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jessica –
      You are right without the “development” stage, you’d never have anything to move forward with to the other stages.

      Also the Symphonic-Puzzle Theory really is a hybrid theory – got catch there. Noel Manning

      Like

  22. Josh Rubino says:

    2. Based on this chapter, what did you find most interesting about the film history timeline? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    What I found more interesting was it was showing all the really big actors that were back in the past, like John Wayne, Charlie Chaplin, and Shirley Temple. Also the history of film and the first films ever made was interesting. The timeline showed you the different actors, directors, and films that made the film history what it is now.

    4. Based on this chapter, which stage of the filmmaking process do you feel is most interesting/important? Why? Defend your answer in detail.
    The stage that I think is most important is the Development stage, this stage is where everything starts and gets set up. People making the movie needs ideas on how the production of the movie will go and the different aspects of what they need to be able to produce a movie. Without the Development stage, people producing the movie will just go in blind and will not be able to be organized on how the movie will cost and where the movie will take place.
    5. Based on this chapter, which film theory do you most subscribe to at this point as you consider film criticism? Do you feel that may change as you engage in more film criticism? Why or how?Defend your answer.
    The film theory that I most subscribe to is the Symphonic-Puzzle theory because in this theory I feel the same way that everyone’s role in the film is important and that the blame should be put on everybody instead of just the director. Yes this will because instead of just thinking it was the director’s fault for the movie being bad, I will think of how everybody that had a part in the movie did and judge it that way.
    – Josh Rubino

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thank you for your feedback Josh. I encourage you to work to make the deadlines on these. Noel Manning

      Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s