(Ch. 1) Response Post – 2.15.19

Assignment Due Monday, Feb. 15 by 11:59 PM:

Read the articles and engage in the chapter, charts and videos. Watch, read or listen to two scott-scripts-1725of the featured screenwriters posted on the page: “The Screenplay: The Blueprint Matters (Ch 1).” You will need to address three questions (one from each part below). Hit reply to this post, and you should also write your name at the bottom of your post:

Part I.: (choose one)

  1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

2. Compare the Freytag Pyramid to Blake Snyder’s approach to understanding story. Where do you see the most similarities? Differences?

Part II: (choose one)

1. How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of Literary Heroes”will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)?

2. In exploration of the “Universal Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.

3. As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen (not listed here) and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example.

Part III: (choose one) -The following answer should have a connection to one of the featured screenwriter in this section. 

1. Based on what you heard (or read) about writing (from our screenwriters), what do you feel is the most important element (or elements) for writers and critics of screenplay? Why? Offer details (identify which writer you viewed/listened to).scriptwriting3

2. How is writing reflected in real life? What makes you say that? Give details (identify which writer you viewed/listened to).

3. What is one of the greatest challenges to writers? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

4. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

46 Comments Add yours

  1. Part I
    2. Compare the Freytag Pyramid to Blake Snyder’s approach to understanding the story. Where do you see the most similarities? Differences?

    The Freytag pyramid examines a story by attempting to divide actions in the story into seven main parts. These parts are exposition, inciting incident, the rising action, the climax, falling action, resolution, and denouement. In the application of the Freytag pyramid, you begin to be able to examine different parts of a story which may allow you to understand in deep context as to what, why, and how actions are formed and made. In contrast, Blake Snyder’s approach to understanding the story is one of an attempt to categorize the genre of story that film may be. When categorizing the genre, there is also an abundance of sub-genres that may exist as well as the general outline of a story, which could provide the basis of what is to happen in a generalized film of a genre or sub-genre. There are similarities between these two such as the act of finding the generalized actions in a story that may exist. There are also differences between the two methods to understanding the story, such as the Freytag Pyramid more closely categorizing the actions in a film and the timely fashion that they arrive in the film whereas Blake Snyder’s approach is more interested in defining what type of story the film may be.

    Part II
    1. How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes” will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)?

    I feel that understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes” will help me as I evaluate films this semester because, through the understanding of both of these important points in a story, there is bound to be a better attempt at understanding the story of the film as well as why characters may act the way they did or will. Understanding the different types of “Literary Heroes” will better prepare me to evaluate films because I can directly correlate the appropriate type of character one may be in a film to my film criticism, which may be valued highly because of such understanding. The Hero’s Journey should be efficiently and proficiently understood by me because through this understanding we are able to know why a hero has done something, what they may do in the future, and how they may possibly change from one characteristic to another.

    Part III
    3. What is one of the greatest challenges to writers? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    Based upon Aaron Sorkin in “7 Rules for Screenwriting”, there are multiple challenges such as the writer’s block, outside activities, and the deadline for some television shows. A writer’s block is where you believe that you are currently incapable of generating any more ideas that pre-existing ones but, fortunately, this writer’s block does not last forever, even if it may feel like it does. Outside activities that may somehow inhibit your ability to write, such as Aaron Sorkin’s addiction to do illegal substances such as marijuana and cocaine early in his career, which when consulted by Carrie Fisher, he realized that getting sober would positively influence his writing, not negatively as he first suspected. To Aaron Sorkin, there is a difference between writing for a television show and writing for a film as with a movie, directors would normally be understanding of a possible time delay in writing whereas television directors need the script by a certain deadline, often reoccurring in time intervals. This deadline may spawn misconception by the writing in a hurry to finish the script they would be working on. To Aaron Sorkin, I believe that having to do with outside activities other than writing would be one of the most difficult and greatest challenges to writers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Nathanael, Wonderful feedback. Thanks for the engagement. Please remember to add your name on each post. – Noel Manning

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Part 1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

    Now that I understand Blake Snyder’s approach on “story genre ” I now know what to look for in different genres of films. For example in the genre “dude with a problem ” you do not look for the fool. Instead, you look for the “hero”, sudden event, and the test of survival. Without this information, I would be looking for the wrong things in different genres of films.

    Part 2. In exploration of the “Universal Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.

    One of the best films that I have seen recently was Venom. When Venom is not fused with a living being he looks like a blob (symbiote). When he enters a lifeform he cannot be seen unless he decides to take over the body. Venom can be seen bad at first but as he gains trust with Eddie (they guy he is infused with) they go and fight the “enemy” Riot who is also a symbiote fuses with another guy that Eddie does not like. Riot wants to bring the other symbiotes to Earth to take over Earth and eat the human’s organs. Venom and Eddie defeat Riot. Venom changes in the movie from bad to good. I believe he changed because he wanted to protect the humans, he also trusted Eddie, and he may have also done it out of fear for the Planet Earth. A lesson could be not to judge people by their appearance or what is the first thing they do. If Eddie would have judged Venom off of what he had done Venom never would have trusted Eddie.

    Part 3. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    I listened to Emma Thompson. I was very impressed at the length of a movie. I was also impressed to hear that some of her ideas come from random things that she sees in public. One page in the script only last about a minute on the screen. I Never thought about how long the script is but now I know most scripts are at least 100 pages or more. It was also funny to hear Emma Thompson talk about the movies that she wrote.

    – Dylan Mistretta 2/12/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan, The Blake Snyder (story-study) approach is really interesting, especially the more films you watch. I find now, that I notice film formulas almost all the time and can apply Snyder’s study to them.

      Nice take on Venom. Appearances can be deceiving.

      I’ve always been pulled into films that had realistic components. Emma Thompson’s approach to writing is based on that approach. I love fantasy, sci-fi and parody as well – but being drawn into a “real” feeling story is something appealing. Noel T. Manning

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  3. evelky4 says:

    Part 1:
    1. Understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” will help me in film criticism by giving me a better understanding of the idea of the story. For example, if I was watching a movie with a “Golden Fleece” story, I would be able to see that and the story a plot points would make more sense.
    Part 2:
    1. Understanding the hero’s journey will help me evaluate films like “story-genre” by allowing me to see deeper into the story.
    Part 3:
    3. I listened to Emma Thompson and now believe that the greatest challenges of being a writer is constantly being shut down and having your scripts thrown away.
    -Edward Velky

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Edward – I just sent you an email.

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  4. Caitlyn Hamrick says:

    How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.
    I feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help me in film criticism by helping me better classify and break down the stories so that I can find the true moral of the story. For example if I can find what category the movie fits it to such as the plots that Blake Snyder as pointed out that almost all movies can fit into I can then better understand the movie and the better I understand what is going on in the movie and the message of the movie the better film critic I can be.
    2. In exploration of the “Universal Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.
    On Christmas I went and saw the film Aquaman. In Aquaman the character started out not wanting accept his responsibility as protector seas and become king of the ocean. After battling his half brother and going on a long journey to find Atlans triton he was finally willing to accept his new role as protector and king of the seas. The moral of the story is to accept who you are because Arthur Curry was not able to accomplish what he needed to until he accepted who he was and his responsibility.
    1. Based on what you heard (or read) about writing (from our screenwriters), what do you feel is the most important element (or elements) for writers and critics of screenplay? Why? Offer details (identify which writer you viewed/listened to).
    I read about the screenwriter Aaron Sorkin. I feel the most important element for writers and critics of screenplay is passion, I think that you need to have a passion for your writing. I believe this because he was able to do it because he found that he seriously loved writing and this writing drove him to write more and more, and commit even when writers block occurred. The amount of time that you have to put in and the amount of thought you have to put in in order to end with a piece that will really become something you need to be passionate enough about writing to put in that great amount of effort.
    – Caitlyn Hamrick

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Caitlyn, The combination thoughts of thinking about learning and understanding message and lessons from both Blake Snyder & general film exploration is nicely presented. Each film we view (especially with strong character arcs) will provide a “life lesson.”

      Taking a passion towards any task, can allow you to get better,stronger and gain more experience … especially the more you put into it. Noel Manning

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  5. zachbaynard says:

    How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

    I think that understanding Snyder’s approach to exploring story genre will be very helpful to me in film criticism as the genre of the movie gives me a taste of what the movie will be about. I think that this is the most common way to encourage yourself to watch a film. Like my favorite genre is comedy, which led me encouraged to watch “Paul Blart Mall Cop” and I loved it. Kevin James was super funny and I laughed the whole time.

    How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes”will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)?

    I think they will help a lot using the Snyder’s formula to understanding films literary. This will help a ton on my Semester Project when I watch The Titanic and try to have a deep understanding of each character.

    What is one of the greatest challenges to writers? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    The greatest challenge to writers will probably have to be the criticism they receive. They write them a masterpiece that they worked so hard only for many people to send them emails saying how bad it was and insult their book and some are so severe they might insult the author and send death threats. I feel that writing is a tough job because not only do you need to have a deep understanding of literacy but also have the ability to not listen of bad criticism but listen to the good criticism that makes you a better writer.

    -Zach Baynard

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zach – Check you email -Noel T. Manning

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  6. jmcmullens2 says:

    Part I
    1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts .
    I feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story genre” can help you in film critic because it makes you look at the character in a certain way. Based off they type of film it is it can be broken down into a smaller genre. This can help you because it makes you evaluate the movie in a deeper way. Bing a film critic you have to be able to evaluate the movie efficiently. By Blake Snyder’s “story genres” it also makes you look at the storyline of the movie. It can be many things however it can be narrowed down to one if his genres by the characters and the story line. Overall it helps you be able to have a more honest nonfiltered review because you are paying close attention to what is going on.
    Part 2ry
    3. As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen (not listed here) and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example.
    A recent film that i have watched would have been a Hulu original named The Body. The character conflict that was presented in this film would be character vs. character. An example of this in this movie would be the group of friends vs. the hitman. They were against each other the hitman was to return the body in a set amount of time however the group of friends stole the body. From there it’s a character vs character
    This is where they begin to go after each other doing whatever is possible to have the body in their possession.

    Part 3
    What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)
    What impressed me the most about the writing process is that some writers know exactly how they want something to be. For example Steve Jobs knew going in that he did not want a certain type of story line. In order to do that he had to be able to communicate his thoughts efficiently in order to get what he wanted. Going out of the way and thinking out of the box is something that they have to do for it not to be exactly like another. This impressed me because at first i thought that they just sat down and began to write with a little thinking process, however it is more than that it actually takes time before you begin to write. It does not always just come to then for example the writing motivation clip. It showed there is more to it than just writing it is a whole process.
    – Jada McMullens 02.13.19

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jada – Nice and solid thoughts and examples. Just a note – it wasn’t Steve Jobs it was Aaron Sorkin writing about Steve Jobs. Thanks – Noel Manning

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  7. 1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.
    I feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” will help me with film criticism by giving me a basic understanding of what the story is about. For example, many films have complicated plots or characters and knowing parts of the story-genre can help me break down the story and get and understanding of what’s happening and how it affects everything.

    2. How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes” will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)?
    I feel that understanding the hero’s journey and literary heroes will help me evaluate films and characters by giving me enough knowledge to figure out figure out which type of hero the character is, how that affects their journey, and what happens throughout their journey. This can help me break down the character in order to understand them and their actions better. This will help me this semester by giving me a basic understanding of the character, which will allow me to explore my view on the characters in a story and it will help me focus on the character more, so I can understand them and why they do what they do.

    3. What is one of the greatest challenges to writers? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to).
    I listened to Emma Thompson. I think the greatest challenges to writers is trying to write something that can please everyone and make them happy. I think this because sometimes people think that what a person wrote is terrible and sometimes a publisher might tell the writer that the story wasn’t good enough. I also think this because the writer wants to make everyone happy and not offend them, but sometimes some people are not happy with what the writer wrote.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rileah, I’d like you to go back in and explore the Blake Snyder story approach a bit deeper. Re: Emma Thompson – yep, you can’t please everyone. In the future, add your name at the bottom or top of each post. Thanks -Noel Manning

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  8. 1. Compare the Freytag Pyramid to Blake Snyder’s approach to understanding story. Where do you see the most similarities? Differences?
    Gustav Freytag’s approach was through the Freytag Pyramid which is a seven-step diagram that was made and used to study a story’s plot. Blake Snyder’s approach is through narrative categories which are like run-down genres. The similarities between the two are that they both have formulas that are in most well-known movies or any film ever made. They are also both very well-known and easy to understand and categorize movies into. The differences though are that the Freytag Pyramid is mainly just about the and does not have much to do with the actual genre while Blake Snyder’s narrative categories have a lot to do with the genre and not much to do with the plot. I do think that if you use both at the same time that you will have a very understandable and easy to follow movie to critic.
    2. As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen (not listed here) and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example.

    A recent film I have watched has been Saving Private Ryan and the conflict was character vs. character between Captain Miller and Private Ryan. The entire movie is about going out and Saving Private Ryan because his three brothers have died and it is time for him to go home from the war. When Captain Miller and his team go behind enemy lines and they finally find him near the end of the movie Ryan does not want to abandon his men to go home and he refuses to go with Miller. They finally after an argument, come to the conclusion of holding off the final attack from the Nazis and blowing the bridge to halt their advancement so that Ryan will go home. During this battle though instead of letting Ryan do a lot of the fighting he restricts him to hiding and avoiding the enemy to protect him. This almost gets him killed multiple times, but in the end, Ryan survives with Miller dying on the bridge.

    3. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    The thing that impressed me the most about the writing process is how complex it is. In the Aaron Sorkin interview, he explained that he had trouble finding Steve Job’s warmth and that he had finally found it when researching Steve was learning to become a father and that Steve never really stood out to him. In his “7 Rules of Screenwriters” article he also explained that writer’s block can take a while to go away, but it does not last forever and that you just have to a break a think of the next line. His article really intrigued me also when he explained that a bad casting decision can hinder an entire project and that casting is 90% of the battle.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan – Some nice thoughts on the Freytag/Snyder examination, but I’d like you to go back and revisit both of those especially in relation to this statement: “Blake Snyder’s narrative categories have a lot to do with the genre and not much to do with the plot.”

      Great example of Saving Private Ryan.

      I’ve always been impressed with the writing of Sorkin; he’s so talented, and his approach to dialogue really amazes me.

      In the future I’d like you to place your name at the beginning or end of each post.

      Thanks – Noel Manning

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  9. petertuong says:

    How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

    I do think that getting used to and understanding Blake Snyder´s approach will help with film criticism in the future. Knowing the story-genre of a film can help you identify other factors such as the problem or character role. Knowing the genre can also help you determine if the movie is being on track or if it is not and being all over the place. An example would be watching a movie you know is a Monster in the House genre/story you know that escape will be tough and there most likely won’t be a hero with powers going to show up to save the day.

    How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes”will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)?

    Understanding and knowing the Hero’s journey and the type of heroes there are can help with film criticism in my opinion because you know the essentials the film should have. If it is missing something you can notice it and if it is negative or positive to the review it is still helping the evaluation. Knowing the types of heroes as well can help with character analysis because you know the character and his situation, if you know that data you can see the traits the character exhibits and if it is correct with the hero type.

    4. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)
    I listened to Aaron Sorkin and what impressed me the most was when he stated how he gets over writer’s block. He said that he doesn’t focus on trying to write while having writer’s block but to take that time to relax and live his life. This stood out to me because many people with writer’s block would just sit in front of their paper or computer to force a story out but he lets the story come out whenever it wants because he knows a forced story is most likely not a good one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Peter – Thanks for offering your feedback, I’d like you to go back and re-examine the section on the literary heroes for a complete understanding and how that can guide you in your project (and in reviewing the character arc).
      Nice thought from Sorkin about ‘Writer’s Block.”

      I need you to add you name to each post as well either at the top or the end.

      Thanks -Noel Manning

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  10. sugarymango says:

    1.How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

    -It can help you in film criticism by showing you the other film genre that you never hear of. You can be shown why a certain event is happening. My favorite would probably be “Dude with a problem.” I mean, you feel so bad for the character because they were in the right place in the wrong time. I have never heard about alternative story genres before, so whenever I’d watch a movie in one of those categories, I wouldn’t understand why a certain thing would happen to a character. Now if I watch a film, (for the critiquing purposes) I’d be able to understand what type of story it is, and why everything is happening the way it does. An example of this is the movie Speed. I watched this with my parents about a year ago. The main character got on a bus that was hijacked. He had to keep it at a certain speed, no one getting off or the bus would explode. At the time I was caught in the action and just thought of the movie as a basic action movie, now that I know of the different genre categories, I can learn more about other movies, and how the story is progressed based on the type. Another example is O Brother Where Art Thou. I’ve seen this movie three times in the past two years and I had thought it was just supposed to be funny. But really it was much more than that, the three characters had a journey they had to go on, just to make it to their one goal. (Basically it was about these three guys who were in a chain gang and they escaped to try to get back home/to freedom, along the way they encounter multiple problems but in the end, they all get to their goal.)

    2. In exploration of the “Universal Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.

    -The film that I’ve seen recently that exhibits transformation and lessons is “Cast Away”. Cast Away was about a FedEx employee named Chuck Noland that got stranded on an uninhabited island after a plane crash. He basically almost went insane until he found a volleyball and painted a face on it. (Proves my “he kind of went insane” point) Through the story, he learned perseverance, survival, choices, acceptance and faith. He had to learn how to survive and persevere through numerous dangers. He had different choices and had to believe he’d get back home someday. (or he really would go insane) And when he got home and his wife was married to another man, Chuck Noland had to accept that he wouldn’t be able to get her back. The same thing happened when he built a raft and sailed out into sea. He lost his companion, Wilson the volleyball. (saddest part in the movie to me) He had to learn to accept that he didn’t have his companion anymore. This man changed from a normal man, to one on the brink of insanity and death, back to adjusting to a normal life again. Through the story the audience learned that you should persevere and try to survive even in the hardest times.

    3. What is one of the greatest challenges to writers? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    -I think the greatest challenge to writers is time, motivation, and inspiration. It’s hard to put in 4 to 5 hours each day, non-stop, especially when you can’t think of anything to write. That gets frustrating. Sometimes you can’t even think of anything to write, and it’s hard to know the next thing to write and what do write (as in a sequel/prequel) The last thing is inspiration. Sometimes you can go without inspiration for a script for days, weeks, even. You also may have deadlines too, which ties into time. But I think the greatest challenge to writers of all kinds.. Is motivation and inspiration. Sometimes song writers cannot write unless they have a sudden burst of emotion or authors of stories/movies can take a long time to finally come up with something. I mean Aaron Sorkin was on crack when he wrote sometimes. You need inspiration to write and sometimes that’s hard to find. I guess he found a way to find it but I don’t think it’s a good idea. You should probably find another way to gain inspiration.

    LUCY HOLLAND

    Liked by 2 people

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy – These were excellent thoughts, examples and feedback on every point. Keep up the thoughtful and engaging posts. -Noel Manning

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  11. noeltmanning says:

    Part l: How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

    His method can help me determine how the plot is structured and what guidelines the writer was going by and what message is being conveyed. For example, in what Snyder calls ‘WHYDUNIT’, the writer makes the protagonist try and solve a mystery by solving who, when, where, why, and how. Then they will include a plot twist, probably about who did it and then the resolution and roll credits.

    Part ll: As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen (not listed here) and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example.

    I recently watched Divergent and I think the conflict is external and it is self vs. society. At the end when she breaks out of the crowd so that she doesn’t have to shoot her family and runs away to go and help the Abnegation is an example of self vs. society.

    Part lll: What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    When I watched Emma Thompson, I was impressed by the sheer amount she needed to write for a 90 minute movie by a certain deadline. I could never accomplish that. I procrastinate too much for that big of a task.

    2/14/19
    Chastlyn Hoyle

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Chastlyn Hoyle – Thanks for your thoughts and feedback. Good examples with the “Whydoneit” & “Divergent.” – Noel Manning

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  12. jscism5 says:

    Part 1.
    1. I feel the genres discussed by Snyder require deeper thinking than what most people would think of when they hear the word genre. It requires us to take a deeper look at the film and what really happens throughout. These are the types of genres that should be used by film critics in my opinion because it shows they really payed attention to the film and what was going on even if it wasn’t in your face and easy to see. I had never really thought about classifying movies like this but the more I read the more it made sense. Almost every movie I have ever seen fits into one of these 10 categories and could even be put into one of the side categories if I went back and paid close attention to detail. I feel like using these categories could really help you become a better film critic because it forces you to read between the lines and see character development and things like that in a movie rather than just watching it for entertainment and not paying close attention.

    Part 2
    3. A film I recently saw as Ant-Man and Wasp and I feel there were multiple types of character conflict in the story but the one I thought played the biggest role was Character vs Self. In the movie Ant-Man had been selfish multiple times causing problems for the other characters during the film. Near the end of the film however he had to make a decision to either help his friends or leave them to fend for themselves, but for him to help them he would have to break his house arrest and run the risk of sacrificing his freedom. He ended up helping his friends even though he knew the risks which showed how he progressed as a character during the film.

    Part 3
    4. I listened to the Aaron Sorkin interview and one of the things that really caught my attention was when he said he treated Steve Jobs as if he was still alive. That was very interesting to me because when I think about biographies I think of people who are more of a part of history and have been dead for long periods of time. I think this would have been challenging for him while writing the script but I respect the way he did it. I think this would have dramatically changed the writing process because it changed it from not talking about someone as much as talking with and to someone. This is a very interesting way to write a biography.

    -Josh Scism
    2/15/19

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh – Thanks for the feedback and for the Antman example (good choice). Noel Manning

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  13. katiecstone says:

    1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.
    Blake Snyder’s approach to “story-genre” makes you understand that almost every movie ever made follows one of the story formulas he writes about. While it seems like a bad thing that all of these movie plots can be easily categorized, I think it actually helps a film critic to see how movies can be vastly different, but still relate to one another. An example would be Aladdin (1992) and Les Misérables (2012).
    2. 2. In exploration of the “Universal Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.
    I recently watched the movie The Edge of Seventeen (2016) (which is why I was really intrigued listening to Kelly Fremon Craig’s interview this week!). This film is about a girl who life keeps throwing obstacles at. Without giving too much away, she loses a lot of people in her life through death/relationship issues and ends up pushing away those closest to her. Towards the end, she realizes what she has done wrong, ends up apologizing and making amends with everyone, and lives happily ever after, for as far as we can see. This movie includes the universal themes of love, redemption, truth, responsibility, acceptance, choices and control, forgiveness, and fear.

    3. 4. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)
    I listened to both Emma Thompson and Kelly Fermon Craig’s interviews and I LOVED them both. Hearing about their personal experiences was incredibly insightful. For Emma Thompson, I was intrigued that she hand-writes all of her screenplays. But I think it is also intriguing that she not only writes screenplays, but stars in the film as well! Being able to do both probably gives her better insight as to how it should be written (and allows her to differentiate good from bad writing). I liked the in-depth research Kelly did when writing The Edge of Seventeen (2016). Talking to high school students and hearing their stories probably added a lot of relatable material to her screenplay! I work on a production during the summer that Robert Inman (a local author and playwright) wrote and every summer he says, “These are nothing but words on a page until you take them and make magic with them.” It was very nostalgic for me when I heard Kelly mention practically the same thing in her interview. I was impressed by how long it took to write these screenplays, I could never have the patience to do it.

    Katherine Stone 2/15/19

    Liked by 2 people

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Katherine Stone – Great examples with Edge of Seventeen, and I appreciated your connection with Robert Inman & Kelly Fermon Craig. I remember interviewing Inman several years ago when he first began writing. He was a former journalist, and that approach to understanding character, narrative and dialogue all helped him along that early novel-writing (and stage-writing) journey. – Noel Manning

      Liked by 1 person

  14. 1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.
    Knowing how to breakdown a film using something other than basic genres gives me more to work with. I can explain a film better using Snyders approach. I can use the Golden Fleece category to explain or critique The Avengers.
    2. As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example.
    In a recent film “The Edge of Seventeen” the character conflict may seem like a character vs. character because it seems like the main character Nadine is fighting with her best friend Krista. But when you actually watch it you will see it is a character vs. self because Nadine is insecure about the fact her best friend is dating her brother and it was the only thing she had that he didn’t.
    3. What is one of the greatest challenges to writers? Why?
    I listened to Emma Thompson’s story and I like to think that one of the hardest things for a writer is either writers block of having someone harshly criticise their work.

    Rayna Chichester

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rayna Chichester – Thanks for your feedback – I’d like to see the examples of “how” the Golden Fleece works with “The Avengers”. How does Emma get through Writer’s Block & harsh criticism?Noel Manning

      Like

  15. travismc88 says:

    For Part 1 of this Response Post I chose option #1) How can Blake Snyder’s approach to Story Genre help in my film criticism?
    Blake Snyder’s work is a great tool for sorting out what could be called “cookie cutter” films. I believe knowing his break downs of these genres he has defined can help realize when someone is doing something truly original. Knowing the basic format a film is going to unfold will help you know what’s coming…until the writer surprises you with a twist on a film norm. I must pick up his books. There is a flick called “Feast” from the mid 2000’s that attempts to subvert the audience’s expectations every chance it gets. Major Spoilers ahead. It opens with patrons of a bar enjoying drinks when a man walks in strapped all over with weapons and guns. He is literally introduced with a lower third text that says “Hero.” He shows the head of some monster and explains how they are under attack and begins to tell everyone to board up the windows when he’s abruptly pulled through a window and decapitated. So it’s a Monster in the House/Dude(s) with a Problem situation. Then in through the door burst the, titled again, “Heroine” the wife of our once hero. All the characters are named archetypical like this: There’s “Beer Guy,” “Harley Mom” and “Cool Cat.” A female character named “Tuffy” and her child is set up to of course survive, cause kids always do, he’s eaten whole. And after the “Heroine” is accidentally shot by another character instead of killed by the monsters. Tuffy’s re-titled “Heroine 2.” And when she escapes to a truck and the rest of the cast has a glimmer of hope they’ll make it out. She drives off without them. Sighs ensue.

    For Part 2 I chose option #3) Focusing on Character Conflicts.
    I love Lovecraftian media. His own short stories, novels and films inspired by his work, and even in video games. If you are unaware of the writings of H.P. Lovecraft, first of all I’m sorry your missing out, but secondly his work is focused on the fear of the unknown. It is often the central conflict in his stories. I recently watched “In the Mouth of Madness” which is a 1994 flick Directed and Scored by John Carpenter and written by Michael De Luca. This films conflict is Character vs The Unknown. Minor Spoilers Ahead. Its about an Insurance Investigator who is tasked with finding the a popular author Sutter Cane who’s books are known to cause memory loss, disorientation and paranoia in “less stable readers.” He is also to try and find Cane’s last manuscript for his next novel. There is a scene where the Protagonist is trying to escape this town where Cane’s books lead him to believe he was located as an angry mob of “affected” readers chase him. He just keeps driving straight but the road magically loops him back to the mob and he keeps u-turning in the road and he drives a mile and he’s right back at the mob every time. I could give countless examples of freaky events like this from the movie. Who’s controlling his fate and the people around them. The people read them so maybe it’s Cane’s books. But the road and the environment can’t read…is it all in the Protagonist head? What is happening to him?

    For Part 3 I chose option #3) What is one of the greatest challenge to writers?
    I watched the Emma Thompson interview cause when I was a child I actually saw the 80’s sketch show she was in which at least here in America was called “Alfresco.” She wrote and starred in with Hugh Laurey and Steven Fry which she mentioned working with in the interview. And well I developed a crush on her. She was so funny and when I re-watched them on Youtube years later, I realized how smart she was and how Political the show could be at times. I just had to fan out for a sec. I also watched the Aaron Sorkin interview cause I’m always impressed of how real his films can feel as far as the relationships and the dialogue feel. Realism: which these writers have a knack for and has to be the most difficult part, in my opinion, to get right. Sorkin is great at having witty characters who have a great back and forth that feels natural, even though it is not so in real life. For example: you’re in an argument with someone and it ends and you part ways. An hour later you think of the perfect thing you could have said to zing them. On screen that doesn’t happen, in Sorkin’s movies everyone says the best response every time. Though it works and it’s great. Doing the Biopics “The Social Network” and “Steve Jobs” these people are (or were) real and paying respects to that must be tough as well.

    Travis A McIlwain
    2/15/19
    I hope this will suffice. I learned alot.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Travis – Deep thoughts, great examples, keep these kinds of responses and dialogue coming. Nice work -Noel Manning

      Like

  16. blakepow says:

    Part 1

    1. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts. I think that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring story genre can help me with film criticism by giving more ways to analyze and criticize films. I can use the examples of Blake Snyder’s formulas for story genre to dissect character, conflict, and story, in a more sophisticated and precise way.
    Part 2
    3. As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen (not listed here) and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example. In the animated film “The Incredibles” the hero’s have to deal with a lawsuit saying that being a superhero is no longer legal because Mr. Incredible was being persecuted/sued by a person who had gotten hurt while he was trying to save him. Mr. Incredible and other superheros were despised by society, the beginning of the movie is based around Mr. Incredible and his family trying to deal with this problem. This is an example of character vs society. An example of character vs character pops up later in the movie when Mr. Incredible finds the boy that he ditched and now wants to make Mr. Incredible pay for humiliating him.
    Part 3
    4. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to) I was impressed and intrigued by the way that Aaron Sorkin was saying that he couldn’t really change the plot for the Steve Jobs biopic because it was supposed to be about his life and he couldn’t change that, so he had to improvise. Aaron had the creative ability to make a reasonable script for something he didn’t really know anything about. The way he made the film interesting without really changing any of the dialogue was by rearranging the events of Steve Job’s life. That’s what impressed and intrigued me the most about the writing process. With film making you have the freedom to be as creative as you want, when you were faced with a problem you could deal with it the way you wanted to. If you wanted to change the script you could, if you wanted to put the plot in a different order you could.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. blakepow says:

    Part 1

    How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts. I think that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring story genre can help me with film criticism by giving more ways to analyze and criticize films. I can use the examples of Blake Snyder’s formulas for story genre to dissect character, conflict, and story, in a more sophisticated and precise way.
    Part 2
    3. As we explore the importance of “character conflicts”, name a recent film you’ve seen (not listed here) and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example. In the animated film “The Incredibles” the hero’s have to deal with a lawsuit saying that being a superhero is no longer legal because Mr. Incredible was being persecuted/sued by a person who had gotten hurt while he was trying to save him. Mr. Incredible and other superheros were despised by society, the beginning of the movie is based around Mr. Incredible and his family trying to deal with this problem. This is an example of character vs society. An example of character vs character pops up later in the movie when Mr. Incredible finds the boy that he ditched and now wants to make Mr. Incredible pay for humiliating him.
    Part 3
    4. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to) I was impressed and intrigued by the way that Aaron Sorkin was saying that he couldn’t really change the plot for the Steve Jobs biopic because it was supposed to be about his life and he couldn’t change that, so he had to improvise. Aaron had the creative ability to make a reasonable script for something he didn’t really know anything about. The way he made the film interesting without really changing any of the dialogue was by rearranging the events of Steve Job’s life. That’s what impressed and intrigued me the most about the writing process. With film making you have the freedom to be as creative as you want, when you were faced with a problem you could deal with it the way you wanted to. If you wanted to change the script you could, if you wanted to put the plot in a different order you could.
    – Ethan Blake Powell

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Ethan Blake Powell – Good examples of character conflicts with the Incredibles -but which “Literary Hero” was represented? Go back and check out that section of the reading. I’d love other examples for the Blake Snyder question -get deeper.

      Wonderful thoughts on Aaron Sorkin and writing. -Noel Manning

      Like

  18. Faith Ramsey says:

    How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.
    Knowing this i can spend less time looking for unimportant information. Example I would try to categorize a film by the genera. Now I can look for things or characters that tell me what he classified it as. In most situations when someone is trying to survive i would classify it as horror but now i know it would be dude with a problem. If i didn’t know this information i would be looking for the wrong things.

    1. How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes”will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)?

    Literary heroes shows me who are the heroes for sure. In some movies what if a character did something bad to protect someone. Does that make them a hero or a villain. It’s confusing so knowing this makes it simpler.

    2. How is writing reflected in real life? What makes you say that? Give details (identify which writer you viewed/listened to).

    The writers take things that has happened in real life. Also most things in non fiction films or books can happen in real life. The skit Emma Thompson did can happen in real life. I listed to Emma Thompson.

    Faith Ramsey

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Faith – Check your email for feedback

      Noel Manning

      Like

  19. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.
    I believe that Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring story genre can help me in film criticism because now I can categorize films in genres that are more specific ones like dude with a problem, buddy love, monster in the house, ect. instead of comedy, horror, sci-fi, and other genres like those and that can help me understand the story plot of the film. Blake Snyder’s thoughts and approaches are more in depth for example the genre buddy love Blake sorted it in three categories the incomplete hero, the counter part, and the complication and this helps you break down the film to have a better review.

    As we explore the importance of character conflicts name a recent film you’ve seen and identify which literary character conflict is exhibited in that film with an example.
    A recent film that I have watched was Spider Man: Homecoming and in the film the character conflict was character vs character. The conflict was between Peter Parker and The Vulture. The Vulture was the bad guy in the film he was stealing vibranium and selling it to others and Peter was trying to stop him so the film was centered around the character conflict between the two. In the film they against each other which is character vs character.

    What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)
    I listened to the writer Emma Thompson’s interview and what had intrigued me about the writing process was that she had mentioned that it can take a long time to write a good script or story. She gave a personal experience that it took her many years to write a good story and she made many mistakes and had to restart some parts. It interested me because I never knew how much time it took writers to write a good story.
    Marleny Martinez

    Liked by 1 person

  20. noeltmanning says:

    Marleny Martinez – Great feedback.

    Like

  21. 1.How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts.

    Blake Snyder’s view on how to evaluate and think in a more complex way about films has given me a new perspective on the way I view films as well. I have now changed the way I view every character in every movie. What kind of role will he/she play how will it turn out if she/he dies and is anything going to happen to the main character. These are all possible scenarios in any movie/film that exists. To properly evaluate a film you must put them in one of the twelve categories that Blake Snyder’s mentioned in his “Ch.1 when story is the Genre” article.

    2. In exploration of the “Universal Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.

    One of the last movies that I watched was black panther I liked this movie because it had lots of action and was filled with excitement. The main character of the movie had learned about a kid that was of wakandan decent but didn’t know it at the time and the kid came back and said that wakanda needed to start sharing it’s power and wealth with the rest of the world who needed it. But black panther refused because he said wakanda was safe for a very long time without assisting anyone that needed it. This made the little boy that is a man at this time very mad and he wanted to rule wakanda for himself.He ended up causing a lot of trouble for black panther and it nearly costed him his life. But finally at the end of the movie black panther learned (lesson) that it was important to share his power with the rest of the world and he started to change the way things were in wakanda. Overall I think the lesson of the movie is to have an open mind when someone gives you advice.

    4. What impressed or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer you viewed/listened to)

    What impressed me the most about the writing process is all the time and effort it must take to get a certain character to live up to the role that they are assigned to play. Getting them to act in certain ways so that they play their role to their full potential. It must be very stressful getting all the scenes and the different parts of the movie to work out. I viewed the film critic when “Story” is the genre. I have already posted this but I didn’t see it so I have decided to post it again

    Jahseim Merritt

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jahseim Merritt – Thanks for your input, Check you email for feedback.

      Like

  22. How do you feel that understanding Blake Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer examples to defend your thoughts. || I feel it will allow me to see genres deeper, as part of the understanding that multiple genre “Blueprints” can be attached to a single film, which could even allow researchers or writers to examine and recreate using that blueprint, which inspires me that 1 person so much creativity for so many people! Snyder’s approach to these things is something new to most people and that’s what makes it even better. If you criticize things in a new way, you allow yourself to be open to experiences and dwell deeper onto what the film or story is trying to show you, and you could learn something too!

    How do you feel understanding the Hero’s journey and types of “Literary Heroes” will help you as you evaluate films (and characters) this semester (especially your semester project)? || I feel understanding the different types of heroes will help me identify characters for my film in my semester project, it will help me point out the hero, and maybe an anti-hero, and a villain, allowing me to understand their methods, morals, and reasoning behind what they do. Heroes and villains are subjective though, heroes aren’t always seen as heroes by everybody, sometimes they only apply as heroes to a certain group of people which can be very very different in the other group’s eyes.

    Based on what you heard (or read) about writing (from our screenwriters), what do you feel is the most important element (or elements) for writers and critics of screenplay? Why? Offer details (identify which writer you viewed/listened to). || I think screenwriting has many important elements from what I watched and I think all of them are critical and wouldn’t work without each other. Aaron Sorkin thinks a big part of writing is being interested in it, if your not interested in what your writing or it doesn’t motivate you, you won’t be able to start or complete it, and if you do, you won’t have extraordinary work because effort won’t be applied. and that’s my idea of the “most” important because if you can’t start something you can’t finish it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jackson – I encourage you to make sure you can apply the elements of Blake Snyder’s approach to story, and the different components of the “Hero’s journey” to you semester project (and other avenues). Noel Manning

      Like

  23. noeltmanning says:

    Jessica Randolph – 2.20.19
    Here is my Ch.1 Response post, i’m sorry I thought that the comment was there but the site messed up and didn’t post it!

    How do you feel that understanding
    Blake
    Snyder’s approach to exploring “story-genre” can help you in film criticism? Offer
    examples to defend your thoughts.

    I think Blake Snyder’s approach could be very effective in finding
    the film genre. He has different sections with different situations that will help us figure out the genre of the film and how it developed throughout the film. I was reading this list and I was thinking, all these genres go with one of my favorite TV shows.
    I know genres for film and TV are different but it seemed so weird and strange how my TV show seemed to contain all these genres throughout the series.

    2. In exploration
    of the “Universal
    Life Lessons” and ‘Character Transformation” offer
    an example from a recent film you’ve seen that exhibited both (lesson and transformation). Explain and defend your answer with film, character change, and the moral lesson.

    A film that I have
    seem that has exhibited both lesson and transformation is the Harry Potter series. Harry Potter went from being an unloved orphan boy to defeating the most evilest wizard in their world through the powerful magic of love. He transformed so much throughout the
    series, at the beginning he didn’t know one thing about this magical world his parents were from and then he get thrown into this magical world, learns magic, defeats the most challenging problem up until he faces death and sacrifices himself for his family.
    There is many lessons in Harry Potter believe it or not, there’s that everyone dies in the end it’s what you do with your life is what’s important. Voldemort uses most of his life trying to reach immortality, he made horcruxes and killed tons of people in the
    process. He could have lived his life and enjoyed it instead of being a coward and trying to outrun death. Another lesson we learned is choose your friends wisely, Harry could have listened to Draco and leave Ron and Hermione and become what his parents never
    wanted him to be, and in the end die to Voldemort. But instead he trusted his gut and went with the person who was caring and actually cared about Harry, not his wealth and status. And i’m going to mention one more lesson that we have learned from Harry Potter,
    there is many more. But another lesson is money isn’t everything, Ron, Harry’s best friend didn’t have that much money, he had a huge family and they barely had enough to pay for all of their school supplies, they had hand me downs of everything. But they were
    so loving and caring what matters more in a person money or personality. The Malfoy family had a lot of money but they were stuck up and only cared about blood status they didn’t have much empathy at all but the Weasly’s did. That shows us that money doesn’t
    matter it, it can’t buy you happiness. Harry had a vault full of money at Gringotts but that couldn’t bring back his parents.

    3. What impressed
    or intrigued you the most about the writing process? Why? (identify which writer
    you viewed/listened to)

    I listened to Aaron
    Sorkin and Emma Thompson. The writing process was very interesting to me from how they set it up to how long the script had to be for a hour long movie. The way that you have to write up a screenplay is very different from writing a book. In a book you could
    just write out how a person was feeling, but in a film they have to write it so that they show these thoughts externally. They way they write the whole screenplay seems very interesting to me from the dialogue to the shots. Also one more thing that is very
    interesting is the different types of scripts there’s the standard, spec, and adapt script. I thought that there was only one type of script and that was it.

    -Jessica Randolph

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jessica -Great example from the Harry Potter storylines (for Universal lessons). Remember as you explore Blake Snyder – it’s all about “the story.” – Noel Manning

      Like

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