(Ch. 1) Writing Assignment for Film Journal “Baggage” Due Feb. 10

For your personal film journal this week, I want you to explore your personal film baggage in more detail. You should have touched on it in your intro blog assignment “Me and Film”, but after engaging in this chapter (especially the article on “Baggage”), I want you to dive in deeper. Examine critically your positive and negative film baggage, and share that on your film journal. I also want you to address how you feel you can overcome the baggage (positive and negative) to provide a well-balanced film critique.

Title your post: What Film Baggage means to me and why.

Reminders: Add three photos, links, and tags to each original post on your personal Film Journal.

NOTE: When you are finished post a link (with your name) here. If you find you cannot post it for some reason, email or message me the link through blackboard. This is due no later than Feb. 10 (11:59 PM). 

 

48 Comments Add yours

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Please try to remember to place your name on each post here – Zach

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    2. noeltmanning says:

      Zach -Thanks for your thoughts, As we move forward, I want you to allow yourself to appreciate other genres, and the reasons why others my “love” what you “hate.” Expanding our “positive baggage” is a goal for this course; hopefully, you’ll be able to do just that. NTMII

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan -Please try to remember to place your name on each post

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    2. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan -Dylan, Nice thoughts. Continue to expand your thoughts and your positive baggage …and who knows, maybe someday you’ll find yourself exploring a “Thrilling Romance” just because you want to. THX – Noel T. Manning II

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy – Please try to remember to place your name on each post here

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    2. noeltmanning says:

      Lucy – wonderful thoughts and perspectives. Continue your willingness to expand your “positive baggage” – you may be surprised what you find. You said you like Batman … is it Batman movies or just the character? I’d love to hear your thoughts about “why Batman.” I may be able to share a Marvel film or two that you’d appreciate … if you’re willing to expand your baggage. 🙂 Noel T. Manning II

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Caitlyn, Wonderful thoughts. Keep working to expand those thoughts on baggage. I loved reading your examples. Before the semester ends, we’ll dive in deeper into Sci-fi and you’ll hopefully discover there’s more to sci-fi than you really think. -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Dylan, Some interesting thoughts; I just sent you and email with more feedback. Thanks Dylan. I also need you to add your name on each post.

      Noel T. Manning II

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Nathanael – Excellent and wonderful presentation of critical thought. Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jessica – Jessica, Thanks for your thoughts. I think we’ll all continue to have some positive/negative baggage with films we view (I do). But the secret is not to allow that to overly weigh your critical approach to evaluating a film. Look to find a balanced approach to reviewing each film for what it is and not what it’s not. As we dive deeper this semester you may find that before it is all over that you can understand (and even appreciate) why others may love black and white films and musical, Thanks -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Faith -You mentioned “Melissa McCarthy, Matt Dillon, and Sandra Bullock ” as “likes” but I’d love for you to get deeper into the ‘why” you like them. We will all be asked to provide more critical thoughts to defend our “likes” and “dislikes.” Sometimes that takes breaking the scenes, characters, acting, and interacting apart. We’ll need to begin to provide “more” context to our feedback as the semester progresses. Thanks -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jahseim Merritt – I need you to remember to put your name on each post.

      I’d love to hear more about why films are good or bad? What makes something funny or enjoyable? I want us to really dive in and address the “why”? Work to defend your thoughts. We’ll all be asked to provide more in the future that “I just like it”, “I just hate it” or it was “a good movie.”

      Your thoughts about why you dislike “horror films” got it – because the disturbing content “stays with you.” That makes sense “why” you wouldn’t want to engage in those films.

      Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks for sharing Peter – The key is finding your balance and working to be open to new things and new appreciations. There’s also an element to finding a way to be true to the evaluations when you examine each film part individually (story, acting, character, music, CGI, etc.).

      Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rileah Graham – As I look at the baggage (positive & negative) you presented, it looks like both relate to characters (actions) and the characterizations (remember last week’s lesson). I find that interesting. I encourage you to continue to break those thoughts apart as you examine “why” characters have this impact on your likes/dislikes.

      Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jada –

      Looking for that balance of baggage is important and should be attempted (especially when reviewing a film).

      Sometimes going in with pre-conceived notions (like expecting every Kevin Hart film to be awesome) can sometimes keep you from evaluating a film honestly because your “positive baggage” can get in the way. If you feel you can’t overlook that “you always” love Kevin Hart films (for example), that’s something you’ll need to note in a review. But as we move forward in the course, we want to explore “the why” we like and dislike films, actors, etc. We’ll also want to examine how things like music, visual FX, writing all play their parts in making a film good, bad, great or horrible.

      Thanks for your input.

      I also need you to add your name to the bottom or top of each post.

      Thank you -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Melanie – Remember to put your name with each post. Thanks -Noel Manning

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    2. noeltmanning says:

      Hey Melanie, Thanks for the fun and engaging response to baggage. If you liked Guardians, you may also appreciate Thor: Ragnarok. Also need you to begin putting your name at the end (or beginning) of each post. Thanks -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Katherine -(don’t forget to place your name with each post on your blog)

      You had some wonderful thoughts that will allow you to offer a balanced review even if you don’t realize it. Your example of “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” is a wonderful example of just that. Sometimes there are certain elements of films that “SHINE” and honestly can overpower some weaknesses. I, for example, recently saw an early screening of Alita: Battle Angel, and the story was honestly average to sub-average (nothing new that I haven’t seen variations of before … and told better), but …. the cinematography, digital FX, sound design and score was absolutely phenomenal. The positive aspects of those items overcame the weak storyline for me, and my review and grade was stronger over all. I still mentioned the problems I had with story, but I still recommended the film because of the visual and auditory brilliance. It is a film I’d suggest watching on the largest and best screen possible for those reasons.

      Great feedback.

      Thanks -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Ethan Blake Powell – Thanks for sharing your dissected thoughts on the Disney classic Old Yeller. Some interesting thoughts. The acting may have been a bit stoic in this one as you noted, but it wasn’t because of the time it was produced, because there were many amazing acting examples during the 1950s. It was probably because of the younger acting talent with less experience.

      As we move forward, Let’s look for a balance of baggage as we review and evaluate films and filmmakers. Thank you -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Chastlyn – Did you know that the idea for The Hunger Games got some of its inspiration from classic short stories “The Lottery” (1948) by Shirley Jackson and “The Most Dangerous Game” (1924) by Richard Connell?

      I hope that as the course moves forward, and you begin to watch films with a more focused eye towards critical thought, that you’ll be able to find a “baggage balance.” -Thank you -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh -The key is learning how to be open to new things, and to listen to others’ critical thoughts, feedback, and reasons for liking something you hate (or hating something you love). Active listening (and viewing) is important as we engage with others and film viewing in not allowing the film baggage (positive or negative) to weigh down or over inflate our reviewing process. Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Josh – The more you watch, and the more you allow the baggage to find balance (and openness) you’ll be able to appreciate “all kinds” of films. That’s the goal, to at least learn how to appreciate them. Thanks -Noel Manning

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  1. noeltmanning says:

    Yunique – Thanks for your thoughts, continue to dive into films and genres with an open mind (and open baggage). Would you try to remember to post your links on the “film critic site” or email me you links? Thanks -Noel Manning

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Gabby -I’d love to hear more about “Why” Grey’s Anatomy so binge-worthy? Story? Acting? Production value? Characters? I’ll want you to dive in and explore your thoughts and defend them more as we move forward.

      And as for negative “baggage” (like yours for Westerns), we should be able to identify “why” those responses occur as well.

      Sometimes it is easy to ID and defend our thoughts, other times we really need to think about it and search.

      Thanks Gabby -Noel T. Manning II

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Rayna, Wonderful thoughts (and a diverse mix of positive baggage) and I appreciate how you search for messages; you’ll find that helpful as we move forward in reviews and your semester project. Continue to think critically and share (and defend) your thoughts. – Noel T. Manning

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