(Ch. 13) Final Response Post & Blog Post -Due. Dec. 5

 

(due 12.5.18 by 11:59 pm)

Part 1: After listening to the interview with Oscar-nominee Seamus McGarvey (Cinematographer for films like the Avengers, the Greatest Showman, and Bad Times at the El Royale), share what you found interesting about him and his approach to the cinematic arts. *Post something different from the other students or add a different angle to an existing post.

 

sad-keanu-movie-theater

Part 2: Final Personal Blog Post: As we wrap this semester I’d like you to reflect and think back on what we’ve covered together this semester. Address one of the following questions/writing prompts and post this as your final personal movie blog assignment (on your own site) with the titles listed below. Make sure you add three photos and three links to your post to be consistent with your other original blog posts. This should be a 400-500 word post. 

  1. Blog post title: “Exploring Film Criticism with a New Perspective” – questions to movie_theater_12consider when writing this: How has your perspective on film criticism changed? Do you approach film viewing differently? Are there elements of filmmaking that you are more in tune with now? Do you appreciate things about film now that you didn’t before? Was there one thing or several things that triggered new thoughts for you?
  2. Blog post title: “Film Criticism = Past-Perfect” – Have you found that the issues and topics we covered served as a reminder or reinforcement of what you already knew? If so, touch on those things.

3. Blog post title: “Film Criticism = Critical Thinking in Action” – How can using the elements of film criticism we explored together help you (and others) examine other arts (music, TV, video games, literature, etc.)?

Crowd watching a movie --- Image by © Daniel Koebe/Corbis

4. Blog post title: “Film: Why it Matters.”  In a world divided by politics, culture, gender, and societal choices – how can film criticism impact humanity in a positive way?

5. Blog post title: “Why Understanding Film History Should Matter to Film Critics.”

Part 1 and Part 2 should be completed by Dec. 5 at 11:59 pm and will count as two grades.

12 Comments Add yours

  1. I found Prof. Manning’s interview with Seamus McGarvey extremely interesting. I found his story of how he became a cinematographer hilarious. What I specifically liked about the interview was how Seamus was so down to earth and honest. I think the most interesting part of the interview was when Seamus revealed what he did to regain his creative spark. I have the same issue sometimes when I’m shooting or when I’m not feeling confident in my ability as a film maker. I remember my internship in 2018. I remember shooting video for Harvest America, capturing Crowder and Chris Tomlin perform in the AT&T Stadium. That was one of the coolest experiences of my life and I just remember being able to walk on the field during the concert and being able to get any shot that I wanted. This serves as a good reminder for me to be free and walk around. Because I have the freedom to get different shots because I can go anywhere.

    Here is also my reflection post:

    https://samuellestake.wordpress.com/2018/11/28/film-why-it-matters/

    -Samuelle Grove

    Liked by 1 person

  2. After listening to the interview with Oscar-nominee Seamus McGarvey (Cinematographer for films like the Avengers, the Greatest Showman, and Bad Times at the El Royale), share what you found interesting about him and his approach to the cinematic arts. *Post something different from the other students or add a different angle to an existing post.

    I thoroughly appreciated the unique skillset that McGarvey possesses. He began his film studies by examining classic movies that were shot on actual film. At the time of the creation of these features, digital cinematic cameras did not exist. By analyzing these older films, he was able to gain a deeper appreciation for their “art.” Filmmakers in those days had to work with limited resources, relying more on their own creativity and ingenuity. As McGarvey became a filmmaker himself, the progression of technology allowed him to experiment with various methods of cinematography. McGarvey’s work is incredibly diverse, from state-of-the-art, CGI-filled movies like “The Avengers,” to period-focused mysteries and dramas like “Bad Times at the El Royale.” When I have watched movies in the past, I have never thought to analyze whether it was shot on film or digital. However, after listening to this interview, I thought back to my viewing of “Bad Times” and recognized what separated its cinematography from the likes of most Marvel films. The lighting has a completely different texture. Whereas in a digitally-filmed movie, everything is perfectly clear and sharp, authentic film cameras require more artificial lighting and special attention to set details. I really appreciate how McGarvey incorporates both approaches in his cinematography, depending on the central story and the director’s intent. “The Avengers” and “Bad Times” could not have been more different from the scope of story, and this contrast was displayed in the cinematography as well. McGarvey’s willingness to use today’s innovations as well as the technology of old is a remarkable example of his adaptability.

    – Tony Stark

    Liked by 1 person

  3. 1. After listening to the interview with Oscar-nominee Seamus McGarvey (Cinematographer for films like the Avengers, the Greatest Showman, and Bad Times at the El Royale), share what you found interesting about him and his approach to the cinematic arts. *Post something different from the other students or add a different angle to an existing post.

    One thing I found very interesting from this interview was how down to earth and how passionate he was, especially when he talked about how his kids should follow their passion. I also was interested as to when he went in detail about how absorbed he was in the art form and the history of cinema. I loved when he talked about how important it is to show how film came to be and to show how much of films has evolved, especially with being a cinematographer. I also loved when he talked about the eloquence of someone telling their own stories and their own distinct way and how so much of that speaks well for the film community.

    also here’s my link to my blog!!

    https://zanestakeatthecinemas.movie.blog/2018/12/03/why-film-matters-by-zane-gray/

    -Zane Gray

    Liked by 1 person

  4. jalissa9 says:

    I enjoy how he ended up becoming a photographer and cinematographer. The tone of his voice he is just so positive explaining how he found his calling and how in college it was exhilarating to study what he was studying. He even explains how he learned so much being in a big city seeing the different cultures. I feel that what he is saying is so important especially relating to what he said about college. Most people tend to choose majors because of the money. You should feel the way he was describing it you should feel passion and exhilaration. Why spend your life not doing what you love? I also love how supportive he sounded about his kids doing the same to be passionate to do what you love. This makes him look more then a photographer or cinemaphotographer he actually makes you relate to things to understand art in a true form. He studies the history and goes back to where it all began and actually does it to understand.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. drewpeden says:

    Part 1: After listening to the interview with Oscar-nominee Seamus McGarvey
    (Cinematographer for films like the Avengers, the Greatest Showman, and Bad Times at the El Royale), share what you found interesting about him and his approach to the cinematic arts. *Post something different from the other students or add a different angle to an existing post.

    What I found most interesting about listening to the interview with Seamus McGarvey was how he encouraged all students or people who are pursing a career in the art form of photography or videography, to go back and look at where they started and look at their growth they have made. This really spoke to me, being a photography major, I tend to get down on myself a lot about my work and compare it to other peoples work and say that mine will never be as good as theirs. This really opened my eyes and allowed me to realize how much I have actually grown in my own career. It was interesting and cool to learn that McGarvey does that with his old work and that’s what gives him motivation for his work.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. drewpeden says:

    Part 1: After listening to the interview with Oscar-nominee Seamus McGarvey
    (Cinematographer for films like the Avengers, the Greatest Showman, and Bad Times at the El Royale), share what you found interesting about him and his approach to the cinematic arts. *Post something different from the other students or add a different angle to an existing post.

    What I found most interesting about listening to the interview with Seamus McGarvey was how he encouraged all students or people who are pursing a career in the art form of photography or videography, to go back and look at where they started and look at their growth they have made. This really spoke to me, being a photography major, I tend to get down on myself a lot about my work and compare it to other peoples work and say that mine will never be as good as theirs. This really opened my eyes and allowed me to realize how much I have actually grown in my own career. It was interesting and cool to learn that McGarvey does that with his old work and that’s what gives him motivation for his work.

    also, here is the link to my final blog post!

    https://amovieadaygwu.wordpress.com/2018/12/06/exploring-film-criticism-with-my-newfound-perspective/

    Like

  7. I really enjoyed hearing his story as a young man following his passion in college in England. His Irish accent made me smile as well! If I ever was a part of the film industry I think that I would come from a very similar place that McGarvey did being mostly director of photography. I liked his perspective on the fact that film an photography are very different I also appreciated his sort of admiration he had for school and young college kids and how it is the stories people my age have that will change the film work for many years. But, he did keep in mind the respect for the growth of technology having to do so much for the boom of this art form, however he reminded us that it still needed a story for any good piece of film.

    -Kelsey Tanner

    Liked by 1 person

  8. noeltmanning says:

    Luke -Response -Part 1: After listening to the interview with Oscar-nominee Seamus McGarvey (Cinematographer for films like the Avengers, the Greatest Showman, and Bad Times at the El Royale), share what you found interesting about him and his approach to the cinematic arts.

    After listening to the interview with Seamus McGarvey. I found quite a few things that were interesting regarding his approach to cinematic arts. However, one thing stood out to me above all else and that is his attitude that anything is possible and that cinematic arts has so much potential. Even before diving further into the interview right off the bat you can see this attitude towards his work in how many different things he has done. Just introducing Mr. McGarvey, I learned that he has done music videos for big name artists, documentaries, period pieces, superhero films, and even musicals. To me, that shows a connection between his belief in anything being possible for him, and the range and diversity of aspects of film that he explores. It shows that Mr. McGarvey is interested in film in general and not any one particular aspect, and that he loves to explore the possibilities and the potential of film as a whole. I find this approach to film and life very interesting and compelling.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. noeltmanning says:

    Luke -Final Blog post -https://lukedukereviews.wordpress.com/2018/12/05/exploring-film-criticism-with-a-new-perspective/

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s