(Ch. 9) Response Post due: Oct. 29 before 11:59 pm.

Response Post due: Oct. 29 before 11:59 pm.

Engage in all chapter 9 materials:

Types of Horror Films

What Makes Horror?

What is a Mystery Film?

Blogging & Reviewing

Ten Things Not To Do As a Critic

The Blumhouse Impact on Horror

Address four of the following questions. In your response, you must should address a different idea than a previous class member, or add a different perspective or approach to each question. The key is making sure that you engage in the materials and share your own ideas:

  1. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
  2. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?
  3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.
  4. Offer some insights from any of the following:

A. the video segments (on horror and/or mystery) “How to Make a Horror Film”, “J.J. Abrams: The Mystery Box,”

B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse

5. After exploring the readings “what not to do as a critic” and “ideas for creating your own film reviewing presence” , what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) to you moving forward as a critic? 

16 Comments Add yours

  1. jalissa9 says:

    My favorite Genre is Horror so it is honestly hard to choose what section of horror I love the most if I were, to say the least, it might be slasher films. I do enjoy Monsters though such as vampires and psychological films are very intriguing to me as well. It just depends on the movie as a whole if the movie is well put together then I will enjoy it not necessarily on the type of horror. For example, Hell fest. Was a horrible slasher film the actors could not act and the whole plot was just too cheesy, but I do enjoy Freddy Koger films and Friday the 13th. Another film I enjoy is insidious that has its psychological and Ghost/Monster sub-genre.

    Just being able to make horror work. I like how it said making the viewer walk in the dark with the character. I strongly agree with that. I feel as nowadays horror films make you know what is about to happen, but sometimes that does cause suspense and make the viewer anxious. For people who like horror films, I feel as if we already know the tricks and what’s happens next. Which makes the horror film, not a horror film it feels just like a thriller or suspense. The viewer needs to be kept in the dark the point is to scare and not have the viewer aware of what’s to come.

    I don’t think horror and Suspense should be categorized together only because I feel that sometimes suspense gives away too many details. If a person is walking into a room the director feels the need to start putting scary music and that’s usually when something is going to pop up. Most suspense thrillers ghost or monsters don’t pop up, but I don’t view it as horror because the elements are not quite the same. I can see where they correlate, but overall if it’s a thriller a person should be anxious if its horror a person should not expect a thing.

    I think just being more organized in my critics always not giving away to much or not saying enough at all. Also, baggage being a fan of a genre or actor and having films I already dislike or rather not watch sometimes can affect what you say in a review. You should give an honest rating with being bias or putting baggage into it.

    -Jalissa herrera

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jalissa, As you look at the “horror” formula for scares, how do you think filmmakers can find ways to make “surprises and scares” different? What makes people continue to go back time and time again if they’re seeing the “same” scares?

      Thanks – NTMII

      Like

  2. 1. Within the horror genre, I prefer psychological thrillers which include films like Shutter Island, Ex Machina, and Black Swan. I love films that make me question what I know to be true. In the movies that I mentioned, the characters are shown in a way that causes the viewer to feel how they are feeling. Specifically, like in Shutter Island. That’s exactly why I enjoy the films that I listed above.

    The types of films that I really can’t watch include slasher, demon and demon possessed, and witches and curses films. I really don’t like slasher films just because of the over the top gore. I just don’t believe that there is a good enough reason to show it in an artistic creation. It just doesn’t seem tasteful to me. In regards to the other categories, as a child and young teenager, I was never encouraged to watch those sorts of films. So that’s why I believe that I feel uncomfortable with watching them.

    2. I didn’t know that the horror genre actually originated from the Greeks. It shows that humans have always been intrigued by what scares us. In a way, mankind has not changed at all. The types of things that scared people when artists were first creating stories still entertain audiences today.

    3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.

    I think that some mystery films could be considered horror films specifically those that are mystery/psychological thrillers. Examples include Gone Girl and Shutter Island. The infusion of mystery into psychological thrillers creates more layers and increases the intrigue with the audience. I personally find these types of movies the most powerful.

    4. For me, I think that I will try to be more concise with my wording. I find that I sometimes let other people’s opinions of movies influence my view of movies. When I see who wrote, directed, or even acted in a film it I sometimes see the film in a different way. Both negatively or positively.

    -Samuelle Grove

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Sam – I love your quote in relation to suspense: “the characters are shown in a way that causes the viewer to feel how they are feeling. .” That can work in any genre, but for suspense – when done right, it is perfection.

      Here is well – nailed it: “infusion of mystery into psychological thrillers creates more layers .”

      Baggage and influence for other critics … good things to know.

      Thanks Sam

      Like

  3. Celia García Martín says:

    1. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    First of all, I must admit that I am not a fan of horror movies; so, in general, I try to stay away from them no matter their sub-genre. However, in a few occasions I have seen horror movies that I have enjoyed. Most of these have belonged to the “monsters” category since many of them are not merely focused on the horror elements, but they also share features with adventure or action films and even comedy. Among these films, I could mention “World War Z”, which I found very entertaining, or the more recent “A Quiet Place”. In the latter case, although this film was categorized as a horror movie, is more focused in the conflicts of a family who has to live in very peculiar conditions. Likewise, this film achieved a very difficult goal: get to capture and entertain the audience with little dialogue.
    On the other hand, horror movies that I do not watch under any circumstances are the ones belonging to the “ghosts” or “slasher films” categories. In the first case, these films usually deal with issues that I find too disturbing. As for slasher films, I find that they have too many gore scenes that I personally do not enjoy watching.

    2. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?

    Horror movies, whether we like them or not, connect us all since everyone has felt fear at some point in their lives and this is a feeling to which anyone can relate. No wonder that fear has been a recurrent topic for all types of artistic productions since time immemorial.
    Besides, many horror movies do not only intend to scare the audience, but to make us think about some of the darkest sides of humanity, even if we preferred to pretend that such evil does not exist. Many horror movies, thus, take real phenomena as their main topic to show what we humans are sometimes capable of.

    3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.

    Many suspense films deal with such terrible crimes that they could also fall into the horror film category depending on our perspective. Likewise, mystery films are often mixed with elements of terror (‘The Others’, ‘The Sixth Sense’). The main difference between a mystery and a horror film is whether the focus of the story is in the investigation of the enigma (characterized by an evil character or force) or in the enigma or evil itself. Likewise, mystery films are precisely mysterious because they play with the audience trying to make them guess who the murderer or bad guy is in the story. In a horror film, on the contrary, we could know who the bad characters are from the beginning since the focus is on the fear that those characters or evil forces make us feel.

    4. After exploring the readings “what not to do as a critic” and “ideas for creating your own film reviewing presence” , what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) to you moving forward as a critic?

    I still believe that the most challenging task for a film critic is one’s own personal baggage. How to get rid of our own opinions about certain film genres or actors and evaluate a film objectively? It requires practice to watch a movie for what it is and not through the prism of our expectations and prior knowledge. It is also very hard to not have some preconceived ideas about a certain film, not only due to our baggage, but also to all the information published in the media. Whether we want it or not, we might see trailers on TV or hear about it from our friends. Be for whatever reason, it is almost impossible nowadays to watch a film in a theater without having given it some thought earlier.
    However, what a true film critic means to me is someone who is capable of evaluating any type of movie in the most objective way possible; and not only that, but also to even enjoy some films that may have not seem very appealing in the beginning.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Celia, Great takeaways from this chapter, and wonderful observations in regards to the understandings of horror, mystery & suspense (and the connections). Everyone experiences some “fear” – great takeaway.

      Continue to work through “baggage” – it is something that even seasoned critics deal with. Thank You Celia

      Like

  4. 1. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    I think the type of horror movies I’m drawn to the most are psychological and slashers, but I like them for different reasons. I find the psychological horror movies to beg more serious questions and I also find them more grounded in reality. I also find them to be best structured movies, for the most part, but that’s no discredit to other forms of horror that are out there. The slasher flicks are the ones I have best entertainment with. Sure, they may not be the most horrifying, but it’s entertainment value are unquestionable. As far as which one I stay away from is tough because it’s not so much I don’t hate the demonic/possession genre, it’s more the idea of how many studio released demonic/possession movies have lost its creative momentum.

    2. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?

    The one idea from the mystery reading was the distinction between the Open mystery and the closed mystery. I also liked how J.J. Abrams was element of the mystery readings because looking at his body of work, he’s well-versed in that arena and he knows how to execute it in the best way possible. When it came down to the roots of horror, I will say that horror movies, from my understanding, are the ones that have the most trouble to it because, generally speaking, I think a lot of audiences have forgotten what true horror is and I think a lot is tied to audience expectations.

    3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.

    I find mystery and suspense are two interchangeable words because a horror movie and mystery movie can feature great moments of suspense. A terrific example of a movie that blends mystery and horror very well is 2012’s Sinister, starring Ethan Hawke and directed by Scott Derickson. I think this movie perfectly fits that criteria because while it is genuinely scary and incredibly frightening, it’s also very engaging because there is so much to unravel as the movie progresses.

    4. When reading the article about Jason Blum, a lot of what was mentioned was information that I really agree with. You look at all the film he’s produced over the last 5-10 years, t’s crazy how successful of a film producer he really is. Sure, not all of his movies will be great or critically praised, but from a business perspective, he knows how the film business works and I can respect that. Other than Kevin Feige, Jason Blum is undeniably one of the most gifted and talented film producers out there.

    5. After exploring the readings “what not to do as a critic” and “ideas for creating your own film reviewing presence”, what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) to you moving forward as a critic?

    I think the biggest and most important aspect when being a film critic comes from the very first point that was mentioned, and that it’s no always check your baggage at the door when you walk in to any movie you’re paying to see. And I also think that idea is tied into anyone who’s involved in the movie; an actor/actress, director and so forth.

    -Zane Gray

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Zane -Thanks for your take of “horror” – Slasher (entertainment) vs. psychological (serious, grounded, structured).

      Zane -What is it about “open and closed” mystery did you find interesting? You mentioned that you feel that “most audiences have forgotten what true horror” is. But, what is it?

      Great example with Sinister (suspense/mystery/horror).

      Baggage seems to be the recurring theme with everyone. We’ll talk more about this throughout the remainder of our time together.

      Thanks Zane

      Like

  5. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    Well I definitely do NOT like demon possession movies. They just genuinely bring the -real- world of demons way too close to my front door. Horror films aren’t my favorite, but I won’t deny I get a hankering for one about this time of year. I probably get drawn to unexplained phenomena horror films. They offer the scariest movie because it’s an unknown creature and it also makes it only a little less likely to happen in real life. Which is nice because I’m a wimp and will have nightmares. 🙂 I mostly don’t enjoy gore and guts in a move because I just really don’t get the point. However, if it is a gore movie, I will completely write it off if it has unbelievable editing with blood.

    What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?
    Something I learned was an important aspect of horror films is that the protagonist should be exploring the unkindwn together. I guess I had never really thought about it that way, but it would be less scary obviously if they knew that clown was about to jump out of the TV. Something else I read is how the best horror comes from each of us. All of us have different deep dark fears, and if we all had to make horror films for our lives, they’d all be very very different.

    Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.
    If mystery is as the reading said an unfolding of some sort, whether closed or open, then why couldn’t it be a houror film as well? I think a detective could interact with evil creatures or demons and could be a cross of both. The person investigating maybe what has already happened still has decisions to make, and maybe what makes it a horror film is the decision to go investigate more to begin with. Even Psycho would fall into this category I think. It’s horrifying (or at least it was years ago) but it’s also people searching for answers.

    Offer some insights from any of the following:
    B. The articles and video on Jason Blum of Blumhouse

    It seems that Jason Blum really has made a huge impact into the modern horror film world. Some of the films like paranormal activity I won’t even watch because I know they’re just too scary for me. What his production company has found the secret to be is “combining creative risks with responsible spending.” It gives the people with great ideas a chance to try and see if the film is feasible, and if it is it the extra money is spent perfecting that idea.

    -Kelsey Tanner

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Kelsey,
      Engaging in horror films from the protagonist state of mind (and our own) can be a challenging marriage. But, if we can ask ourselves “how would I react in that situation” it can place us closer to the action (and the fear) that horror films try to incite with audiences.

      Excellent thoughts about “suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category” with the open/closed mystery- nice example as well.

      NTMII

      Like

  6. 1. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    Personally, I am usually drawn to the psychological thriller and the monster sub-categories of the horror genre. Honestly, some of the other types of horror films are too extreme for me. I do not like the overwhelming blood and gore that is found in slashers, or the ghost and demon possession tales that will give me nightmares for weeks, or even the witches and curses stories that make me feel like I am losing my religion. However, psychological thrillers are intriguing to me because of their closeness to reality. The audience is given direct insight into characters and events that could very well happen in the real-world, without too much hyperbole and exaggeration. In looking at monster tales, it might seem strange that these appeal to me considering my distaste for blood and gore, but what grabs my attention with these films is their historic mythology and ancient roots. The Mummy franchise combined a fascinating story, advanced visuals and effects, and ancient history to create an enthralling franchise of films. I also have appreciated films from “The Monsterverse,” like Godzilla (2014) and Kong: Skull Island (2017). Based on decades-old stories and myths, these newer films are making advancements using the technology in the current era of film to further progress the legendary status of these narratives.

    2. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?

    I don’t think I had ever actually thought about the effect that a ray of hope can have in a horror story, actually making the story more frightening. If the outcome of the film is predetermined as certain failure, then there is no suspense or anything to build tension throughout the story. When you know the ending, there is nothing to create interest. However, when there is a possibility, albeit slim, that there will be an ending remotely positive, this establishes feelings of anxiety and uneasiness in the audience. We are constantly wondering “how” and “if” this hopeful conclusion will occur. This had always been impacting me on a subconscious level, but it never actually registered with me consciously. Going forward, I will make sure to keep this in mind as I view horror films.

    3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.

    A film I viewed earlier in the semester for this class, Silence of the Lambs, is a mystery/thriller film that could very well cross over into the horror category. It shows us the darkest aspects of humanity, with disturbed, psychotic individuals, in a reflection of the real world. This is not some fantastical universe or supernatural world. Rather, we are shown the serial killer Hannibal “The Cannibal” Lecter, who is the darkest representation of a criminal that I have seen in a film. The fact that there are people like this who live in the real world is absolutely terrifying in itself. The more believable a mystery/horror film is, the more fear it produces in me personally as the viewer.

    4. After exploring the readings “what not to do as a critic” and “ideas for creating your own film reviewing presence” , what is the most beneficial (and the most challenging) to you moving forward as a critic?

    In looking at things to avoid as a film critic, one particular tip that stands out to me is “Don’t let the audience sway your opinion.” A recent example that came to mind for me was Star Wars: The Last Jedi. It was a very divisive film across the Star Wars fandom, mostly due to events that seemingly did away with mysteries and fan theories that were supposed to be huge plot points. Fans had built up huge expectations in their minds, and when these were not met, major backlash ensued. It did not bother me on my first viewing, but it is hard not to get caught up in all of the negative buzz, especially as a die-hard Star Wars fan myself. However, at the end of the day, there is no reason that I should let others’ views change the way I feel about a film. I thoroughly enjoyed The Last Jedi, and thought it was an excellent film. That is what I should hold on to, because it is my own opinion.

    As far something that could be potentially challenging as a critic going forward, I think it will be the sheer amount of time taken up by this job. Watching a single film alone can take anywhere from 90-180 minutes, depending on the genre and target audience. That is only half the battle, as you have to pay attention to a multitude of cinematic details and elements that the casual movie-goer only subconsciously processes. Then, there is the matter of pulling together these thoughts into a coherent review that is concise enough to hold the reader’s attention, yet thorough and comprehensive so as to accurately convey your message. This is a process that must be repeated time and time again in order to get your name out there as a critic. The journey to becoming a professional critic is long and arduous, but with patience and diligence, this goal can be attained.

    – Thomas Manning

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thomas – LIKE: “psychological thrillers are intriguing to me because of their closeness to reality.” I believe that REM feels the same way you about witches & demons. Check out their song: Losing my Religion. 🙂 I agree that the monster films never get old … they just get “retold.”

      The “ray of hope” or “sliver of light in the darkness” in horror films I believe is the anchor for audiences. NIce observation.

      Your example of Silence of the Lambs can fall perfectly into the horror-crossover category (suspense/thriller). Sometimes “monsters” are REAL.

      Re: Film Criticism: Film baggage comes in many forms, and audience/critic buzz and expectations play into that. Great thoughts about the “amount of time” it takes to write film reviews well. Really like your feedback here.

      NTMII

      Like

  7. drewpeden says:

    1. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    • Gosh this is a hard question to answer. I love all types of horror films. I will watch any horror film. I have a positive baggage of loving to be scared by any horror film, and they all peak my interest for different reasons. Nut, if I had to pick one for the sake of this assignment, I would have to pick “Psychological Thrillers”. These films always peak my interest just a little more than all the other genres. Not only do these films provide an overall better story line than others most of the time, and I love the realistic aspect of these films. Some of these films dive deep into the mind, and pull fear from within, and that’s truly what I like. The mind is the scariest thing of all, and these films know how to not only mess with the minds of the people in the film, but also the people viewing the film.
    2. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?
    • I gained huge insights about how most viewers want to be shown the horror in a film, and not told about it. Seeing it through the eyes of the person in the film is more powerful, and almost as if we the viewers were in their shoes going through what they are going through. I know from personal experience, that when I truly get scared by a film or scene in a film, my heartrate jumps and sometimes I even break out into a sweat. I also agree with what I read when it said that true fear comes from within our own minds. Some things that I may see as scary, that other people may not, come from the depths of my mind and string information that triggers my mind to tell me to be afraid.
    3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.
    • I completely agree that there are certain suspense/mystery films that could be classified as horror films. Lets look at Shutter Island for example, a film that I really enjoy, and that does scare me at some points. It scares me, but not like traditional horror films, it deals a lot with the mind, and how people from a mental asylum think and act, and it truly is scary that some people do think like that and that’s how their minds actually work. Anything suspenseful that relates to the mind, could for sure be considered a horror film.

    4. After reading the articles and watching the videos surrounding this question, I found J.J. Abrams TED Talk about “The Mystery Box” to be the most interesting. Suspense films and mystery films are all just one big mystery box. You never know what is truly inside the box until you open it, just like in films, you never know what will happen in the film unless you dive deeper into the film as you watch it. Also from the character in the films POV, the character will never know the outcome of something unless he first searches for something that brought him/her to where they are. You never know what is in the insane asylum unless you go inside and find out.

    -Drew Peden

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Drew – I agree that the psychological thriller can lay with the mind (and the fears of our realistic thoughts); I love these as well.

      “Show don’t tell” is a great lesson for horror writers or filmmakers.

      “Shutter Isle” -great example.

      “The Mystery” box example is wonderful. J.J. is truly talented (in my opinion), and he’s found ways to cross genres, and bring the “mystery” to many of them.

      Thanks Drew

      Like

  8. noeltmanning says:

    Response post by Luke:
    1. Based on the readings, which end of the horror spectrum do you fall (name the category)? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    – Based on the readings, I most likely fall into the psychological thriller category. I think that I am drawn to these kinds of stories because of the realistic factor to them. The serial killer psycho type of film is relatively realistic and some movies are actually base on true stories which makes them that much scarier. My mind is usually drawn to the scary movies that could potentially be real. It is one of those reactions for me that has me on edge even after the movie because of the realistic suspense. Knowing that the realistic aspect of a horror film scares me the most adds to why I think the monster genre of horror movies is the lest appealing to me. I tend to stay away from the horror films that are mythical and just totally outlandish in terms of reality. Something that I know isn’t going to be real isn’t going to scare me like a werewolf or vampire. I just know they don’t exist, and for that reason they don’t bother me in the way that a psychological thriller might.

    2. What insights did you gain from reading about the history and roots of the horror and mystery genres? Or, what knowledge was enhanced or strengthened? Why?
    – Some insight that I gained from reading about the roots of the horror genre and the aspects of horror films that are so important to the success of the film. For example, horror must exist alongside hope in order to be relatable and more impactful. It is a crucial aspect of a horror film but not one I thought of immediately. If I know that a character is about to reach the end, it kind of turns me away just because it is so predictable. However, if there is a chance for survival or escape then the whole situation becomes that much scarier. Another insight that I gained from the reading was about mystery films and the importance of suspense and how it can be built up throughout the film. Whether it is the timing of the suspense, music, camera angle, or a plot twist, the suspense is crucial in creating a mysterious feel. It was interesting to read about the aspects of a horror film to look into why some horror films are as successful as they are, and the ideas behind them that make them so scary.

    3. Some argue that certain suspense/mystery films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings (and videos), defend why that statement could be true. Provide an example of a film you may have seen that would match the criteria.
    – The idea that suspense/mystery films can cross into the horror could be true due to the two genres sharing some similar aspects of their production. For example, a mystery movie that’s about a psychopath killer who is very good at hiding very gruesome crimes and is pursued by an expert investigator. A movie like this has the aspects of a mystery film in the intricate crime solving and suspense built up from the reveal of the killer. However, it could also be a horror film because of the gore and gruesome killing scenes from the killer. A great example of a movie like this that I have seen would be the movie “Silence of the lambs” this movie has incredible suspense built up in character conflicts and catching of the criminals, and also has some gruesome scenes of Hanibal Lector’s work.
    4. Offer some insights from any of the following:
    – In regards to the Jason Blum of Blumhouse and the Blumhouse impact on horror. I find it interesting as to how Jason Blum has stayed ahead of the movie making curve. The article on “The Blumhouse Effect” offers great insight into why he is so successful in the industry. Combining risks with rules, Blumhouse has become one of the most acclaimed studies. I think this approach to movie making is interesting because of how out of the ordinary it is for film industry. I think it is common to believe that a high budget film is going to be the most successful. However, Blum has proved that to be wrong. A great example of this is in the Blumhouse Production film “Split” and also “Paranormal Activity. Both are films that aren’t very outlandish in terms of money spent and filming overall, but both were huge successes. Blum takes the risk of putting out a cheaply produced film while also following the rules of horror film making. The combination of the two makes a model that has proved successful. What I find interesting about the Blumhouse approach to filmmaking is where else it can be applied. What other ventures in one’s life could they succeed from combining Rules and Risk?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Luke – For you it seems you like horror films that are “reality-based,” no crazed supernatural madman with a hockey mask or machete for you.

      When I researched this piece (roots of horror) several years ago, I too, was caught by the “hope + horror” marriage. It really makes sense when you consider why we may be drawn to the story (or the characters). Without hope of survival, what would compel us to continue the journey.

      I think in many ways, Blum really does follow the Earl Owensby method for success (in indie films).

      Thanks Luke.

      Like

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