(Ch. 7) Response Post

Response Post Assignment for Chapter 7 (due 10.15.18 before 11:59 pm)

  • Engage in all of the materials for Chapter 7 including these sections:spidey_tangled
  1. Visual Effects
  2. Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV and Beyond
  3. The Fiction that is Science
  4. Looks like a Disaster to Me
  5. We Are All Superheroes (why-superheroes-matter
  6. The Event that is the Blockbuster

Address the following writing prompts:

  1. What insight did you gain from the history of special effects/disaster films (digital or otherwise)?
  2. How has your understanding of science fiction changed after reading the material? If it hasn’t changed, what was reenforced?
  3. As you explored the reading  “Why Superheroes Matter” – defend or dispute those thoughts from your standpoint.
  4. While exploring “Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV & Beyond” you should notice some differences and similarities. What similarities do you feel are the most relevant when reviewing films (regardless of the medium of distribution)? Why?

 

Upcoming Assignments:life_still_3

Final Project notes:

October 13-31 – watch final two films (and make detailed notes).

October 17 (by 11:59 pm) – Review  – 550-650 word review due. For the list of science fiction, superhero, disaster or epic films listed in this chapter. 

November 1Semester Project Notes: Next draft of introduction, biographical sketch, and first section of your exploration into your character (film number one) should be complete.

16 Comments Add yours

  1. 1. I found the history timeline of CGI films interesting. Each one using more CGI and using/ evolution it in a different way. I would say that there are two or three distinct films that changed the game more than others. Star Wars: A New Hope, Lord of the Rings, and Avatar were the staples that I saw. After each film, there was a noticeable evolution of the quality and type of CGI. Both Star Wars and Lord of the rings had a mix of CGI and live action and Avatar was almost completely CGI creation. I think one reason for why Star Wars seems more real to me than the CGI in Jurassic World is that there was a mix of puppets and CGI. Spreading out the CGI instead of using for every single creature and ship made the film look slightly more real.

    2. I find the concept of the first idea of Aliens in the “Voyage Dans La lune” interesting. Aliens are so common in films, TVs, and in media now. I can’t think of the first time I ever heard or saw an Alien. I find it so fascinating at how we have created a sub-genre of films looking specifically at Aliens. There is no evidence of their existence, but we are absolutely amazed by them. I believe that’s why the science fiction genre is so successful. We are able to see what the mind can only imagine. We can’t see dinosaurs on an island or travel to future time when our country is divided into factions. The impossible or sometimes unimaginable becomes real.

    3. I do feel like superheroes matter. I might not be the most subjected person since I have seen every Avenger’s films in theatres. But I believe that superheroes films matter since they provide people with a source to explore their desires of what being a superhero would be like. Some superhero films explore the pros and cons in an extremely entertaining way. I feel like it also offers audiences the ability to feel safe. Knowing that if we were to be ever invaded by aliens that our superheroes would be able to save us.

    4. Despite the medium, the film critic should be knowledgeable, not only about the film they watched but also about other films in the genre and of other films that might be relevant. I also believe that a review should be as subjective as possible, if they show that they have emotional baggage when talking about a film, they might not be called back to review another film. If they share their baggage it makes the review seem unprofessional and distracting. In my reviews I need to work on excluding baggage from my reviews. A few other things that I think a film critic should do is be prepared and concise. To be believed by the audience the critic should be composed, funny, prepared, and most importantly, be confident. If you don’t believe what you are saying, how will others?

    -Samuelle Grove-

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Sam -Great take on “Star Wars” feeling more “real.”

      The imagination fuels so many narratives, but I believe the “what if” stories of sci-fi and fantasy are the perfect avenue to explore (and expand) the mind.

      You got it Sam, you’ve got to “believe” what you’re sharing. View more, write more, go beyond your comfort zone. Thanks -Noel

      Like

  2. jalissa9 says:

    The main thing I got focusing on CGI is that the effects throughout the years have just gotten clearer in a way. They still do effects by using props and items to create multiple sounds. From the beginning, they could use fake gorilla cars and use light poles to switch a scene. This makes me wonder while watching movies how certain sounds and scenes were created. You would never think a tornado would be formed by a silk stocking like that’s crazy. For me, Avatar and the Polar Express is what hit off the breaking point of CGI. The effects in those films are very clean and done so well. Back then you can tell some of the shots look fake, but you usually could never tell what they used. Now you read about what effects are used in movies and are shocked at the fact that was even possible.

    Science fiction has been around for quite some time now. What I didn’t know was SYFY was a big part of the history of science fiction. As a kid that was one of my favorite channels. It was the channel where you saw spooky fiction movies, but also, I didn’t know it correlated to bigger topics such as politics and racism. That they used films that weren’t necessarily real to ease the topics the layer underneath. Channels and movies of this genre are mainly ideas that are are not humanly possible. Sure, going to outer space is possible, but now when they throw different planets and aliens in the mix. When doing that though it catches viewers eyes because it makes you think “what if”.

    Superheroes do matter I feel writing this I am biased since avenger films are in my top favorites. I feel that it gets deeper then preference it’s what superhero portrays. I wrote at the beginning of the year how my mom’s fav actress was the lady who played “Superwoman” and how watching that film made her feel strong and able to do anything. Even though you can’t have super powers or actually fight crime like in the films. It shows them fighting the bad and people correlate that to everyday situations. Superheroes give young kids a perspective that they can do anything and I feel like that matters.

    Reviewing for any type of film whether its print or radio. The important things that stuck out to me are structure and spoilers. That’s where I feel similarities are seen. If your review is all over the place and people are getting lost they may think you didn’t understand the film at all. If you spoil the movie with giving to much away you will get some very negative comments. It always bothers me when a good movie comes out and people start talking about it on twitter or post it on snap chat. Spoiler alerts: should not be a thing in reviews I want the suspense to keep building up and have a sense of the movie not know the movie itself.

    -Jalissa herrera

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      CGI is continuing to make advancements, but I agree, we still have a little ways to go before it is completely seamless (and realistic). But progress is being made.

      Social, political and cultural commentary have been connected to Sci-Fi for a long, long time and will continue to be.

      Spoiler-free …. that’s the way I like it too.

      Thanks Jalissa

      Like

  3. Celia García Martín says:

    1. What insight did you gain from the history of special effects/disaster films (digital or otherwise)?

    Technology has not only improved the quality of visual or special effects, but it has also meaningfully decreased the time required to create those effects. Before the appearance of computers, people had to be much more creative and invest much more effort to create a specific effect. Such is the case of ‘Jason and the Argonauts’ (1963), where a four-minute scene took more than four months to film. In this regard, we must also take into account the merit of creating effects such as the latter, which must have been very impressive at the time. Even today, it is surprising to see how well performed some of those effects were considering the resources people had at their disposal.

    2. How has your understanding of science fiction changed after reading the material? If it hasn’t changed, what was reenforced?

    Science fiction first appeared as a way for directors to respond to existential questions. Therefore, although science fiction might seem a superficial genre of films (especially today due sometimes to the excessive use of special effects that do not add anything to the film), it was originally a transgressive and revolutionary genre. One of the first ideas on which science fiction films was based was the question “are we alone in the universe?” This question challenged people’s views of the world as well as their believes and many directors used this idea for films like ‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind’ (1977), the first three ‘Star Wars’ movies (1977-1983) or ‘Alien’ (1979).
    This idea was so successful that it is still a common topic in films like the recent ‘Arrival’ (2016) or the Alien sequels ‘Alien vs. Predator’ (2004) and ‘Alien Covenant’ (2017). This proves how science fiction meets often a specific goal: try to provide answers or theories to questions that each of us threads and feels curious about at the same time.

    3. As you explored the reading “Why Superheroes Matter” – defend or dispute those thoughts from your standpoint.

    Superheroes have never been so popular in cinema like nowadays. On the one hand, they represent the metaphor of how we wish many times to be like superheroes and hide our insecurities and fears behind a mask. They also symbolize a strong sense of justice that does not occur often in the real world. Many people also identify themselves with superheroes alter egos who are often portrayed as misfits or nerds who do not seem to find their place in the world. In a way, these superheroes get what many people would like to have in real life: special powers and incredible abilities to be popular and to earn other people’s respect.
    On the other hand, the superheroes genre has been so exploited that some of these films have lost their original purpose. Although superheroes are still portrayed as superior beings who seek justice, many of these films are just full of special effects as well as endless battles and persecutions that do not add meaningful content to the story.

    4. While exploring “Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV & Beyond” you should notice some differences and similarities. What similarities do you feel are the most relevant when reviewing films (regardless of the medium of distribution)? Why?

    Conciseness and brevity. These are key factors when writing a review in any type of format since film critics are often required to write their reviews in a specific number of words. They must be able to choose an attractive title to catch people’s attention, limit to meaningful information and leave behind any superfluous elements. Although at first it might seem easier to write a short rather than a long review, to try to cover all aspects of a film in just a few sentences is a challenging task that requires practice.
    Another essential element that we must keep in mind is the target audience that will read the review. Thus, if the review is going to be published in social media, we should assume that most of the audience is going to be rather young. On the other hand, if the review is going to be part of a written journal, the target readers will probably be slightly older. Bearing those thoughts in mind we will be able to choose the right words or expressions that we want to include in our review and achieve better results.

    Celia García Martín

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Special effects creation is truly an art form – and creating art takes time. Even though we’ve made incredible technological strides (and it shows), it still takes amazing amounts of time to create these works (but the enhancements have made it easier. ).

      Really great thought about science fiction … ultimately about “asking questions.”

      Putting on the “mask” of the “hero” not only allows us to hide insecurities, but also allows us to show a different personality side.

      In a few weeks, you’ll have to write a piece for a specific “audience” – we’ll see how all these elements come into play for that.

      Thanks -NTMII

      Like

  4. drewpeden says:

    1. What insight did you gain from the history of special effects/disaster films (digital or otherwise)?
    • I did not realize how far back special effects were used. Special effects have been around as far back as 1929, and I was shocked! I have never seen a movie that old, but I honestly didn’t know special effects were even possible that far back. I thought it was all on set and normal, but after watching the video, on the best visual effects that go back as far as before 1930, it is crazy at some of the things they were actually able to accomplish that long ago.
    2. How has your understanding of science fiction changed after reading the material? If it hasn’t changed, what was re-enforced?
    • My understanding of Science Fiction Films has changed slightly. I knew a lot about science fiction, seeing as it is my favorite genre of movies, but I didn’t know the specific categories such as invaders or travelers, etc. I honestly just thought that they all fell under the genre of Sci-Fi and not into sub categories within Sci-Fi.
    3. As you explored the reading “Why Superheroes Matter” – defend or dispute those thoughts from your standpoint.
    • I have already read this piece as a source for my semester project, but it was nice to read it again and apply it in a different area other than my project. Nicholas Conley had some very good points to say, and I can personally agree with everything that he said. I love superhero films, and I always have for as long as I can remember. I agree that superheroes are portrayed as “larger than life” figures, but I also like how Marvel Studios takes these larger than life heroes and brings them down to our level and makes them relatable to the average person. Take Spider-Man for example, a huge superhero who swings around NYC fighting crime, but when you look at his alter ego, Peter Parker, you see a nerd who gets bullied and picked on and walked a over. The average person can relate to that, because at some point in life, everyone has been bullied.

    4. While exploring “Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV & Beyond” you should notice some differences and similarities. What similarities do you feel are the most relevant when reviewing films (regardless of the medium of distribution)? Why?
    • I think the first part of the article really holds a wide range of similarity for all mediums of distribution in regards to film reviews. There is always some sort of deadline, regardless of how far in the future, or how soon it may be. There is always an audience that the review is being written for, whether its for the general public, or if its written for a specific group. Take “focusonthefamily.com” for example. This is a Christian based website that reviews films and gives them ratings based on a standard of Christian ethics, and if it is appropriate for Christian families, or even just regular families with kids in general. Also, nobody wants to know the spoilers in a film, because then that ruins the whole movie, and then someone may not want to see it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Drew – Special effects go back even further (what you saw were Oscar-winning effects). Check out -Le Voyage Dans la Lun (A Trip to the Moon) by Georges Méliès (1902).

      Finding our inner superhero is always a fun thing to thing about. Asking which character (or alter-ego) we best identify with can be an interesting exploration. If you’ve never take this quiz -it is fun: https://ohmy.disney.com/quiz/2018/04/27/quiz-avengers-infinity-war-character/. Here’s my result: “YOU’RE T’CHALLA AKA BLACK PANTHER!
      You have the spirit of a King or Queen! Just like T’Challa, you’re honorable, responsible and a true leader. You have a strong moral compass and your family and friends trust you to do what’s right.”

      Understanding deadlines, audience and your best approach for sharing your review are key.

      Thanks Drew

      Like

  5. Insight I gained was just how far we’ve come. There’s a few of us Graphic Design majors in this course and I think I speak for all of us when I say, we can easily out edit some of those older effects. And likely that’s because the software we use for simple effects is just so accessible to us. They didn’t have that back then thought, and I imagine that if I had been in a theatre in the 50’s when fx were born, my mind would have been blown.

    I can understand science fiction more after this section. It mentioned how it found its roots during the advent of the industrial and scientific revolution, which makes a lot of sense. I think when some questions were being answered, there was more questions that arose. The “what if” narrative is still around today and will be until all our questions are answered, and that will be a LONG time. This genre seems to find itself very sustainable since those what if question will most likely always be in the back of our minds.

    NIcholas Conley’s essay excerpt was very honest and it said something I think we always want to say, but don’t always know how. Like he said, most of us think we have more inside strength than outer, and what superhero’s like spiderman do is inspire that inside strength to manifest outwardly. Not physically -although Clark Kent was strong to begin with- but with wit and power to do the work for the greater good given the things were given. The superhero narrative I would say is also fairly sustainable. I can imagine that the masses will always enjoy a story that inspires them to do the honorable.

    Whether print, online, radio, or TV, somethings never change when it comes to reviewing movies. Some things that are constant include following correct writing etiquette, knowing your audience and keeping them interested with humor or another tactic, keeping your review in tact, and almost always no spoilers. Something else that I think I need to work on is getting feedback. If I were in the field and my career depended on it, you bet I would have 5 or more people proofreading it.

    – Kelsey Tanner

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      The “what if” landscape is very much still alive and well. That driving force still has the control.

      Keep those thoughts intact with your writing reviews, that will carry you.

      Like

  6. 1. 1. What insight did you gain from the history of special effects/disaster films (digital or otherwise)?

    It amazes me how much technology has advanced over the last 25 years, especially with the film Jurassic Park, which managed to blend practicality and computer-generated imagery. And to see it evolve over a vast portion of history is truly astonishing. Obviously, I could go for something mainstream liked Star Wars or Lord of the Rings, but the one form of special effects is performance/motion capture, particularly with the actor know as Andy Serkis. Andy Serkis is the origin for this aspect of filmmaking, and it’s given actors/actresses to opportunity to actually get to perform as a CGI character, and when watching the VFX video, it talked about performance capture, and the character that caught my eye was the character of Caesar in the rebooted Planet of the Apes trilogy. I think this aspect has not only changed the art of special effects but for the argument of acting and capturing one’s performance.

    2. How has your understanding of science fiction changed after reading the material? If it hasn’t changed, what was reinforced?

    Nothing from the reading on science-fiction was new to me, but something that I always have to keep reminding myself is the genre of science-fiction has been the filmmaker’s way of asking big questions. Growing up, I was always engrossed by science-fiction movies, and growing I’ve noticed that sci-fi has been able to branch out into sub-genres. The science-fiction genre is arguably the most successful genre that Hollywood has under their belts, and if we were to look at the box-office, it’s no contest. I also think that audiences around the world have been engrossed by spectacle or something that seems larger than life, so maybe that

    3. As you explored the reading “Why Superheroes Matter” – defend or dispute those thoughts from your standpoint.

    When looking at Superhero movies, I can’t think of another genre, today, that’s been this successful and this beloved. Over the last 15-20 years, we’ve seen a resurgence of superhero movies, and for the most part, they got better and better and started in evolve as not just good superhero movies, but great movies as a whole. It’s given audiences the ability to feel comfortable and to watch someone with god-like abilities take down the bad guy and stop evil from happening.

    4. While exploring “Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV & Beyond” you should notice some differences and similarities. What similarities do you feel are the most relevant when reviewing films (regardless of the medium of distribution)? Why?

    I think film critics should be well versed in the history of cinema, and not just American cinema, and this ties into knowing your demographic. It’s almost important to note that your review for a movie, TV show etc., should be well engaged and easy to follow, but the problem I’ve had with that is reviewing a movie that’s more than 10-20 years old, or if it’s a movie that most people have seen. But the biggest thing that every single film critic should know is use your own voice. Don’t just copy or imitate someone else, because at the end of the day, it’s your opinion on the subject. Talk about what worked for you and didn’t work for you and execute your own subjective reasonings. Sure, you should be prepared for someone who saw the movie in a different way, but try and to be as concise and as open minded as you can be.

    -Zane Gray

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      The work of Andy Serkis is truly stellar (and continues to be). He’s an amazing actor (his facial expressions are amazing).

      Sci-fi has always had different branches. Take a look at the list I provided, and you’ll see that.

      Zane – you didn’t really apply your thoughts on the superhero response to the actual “reading.” Go back and take a closer look.

      Great thoughts on number “4.” We’ll dive into reviewing DVDs (and older films) soon. But the key to reviewing films 10-20 years old is still the same … continue to ask the same questions and review those films within the light of the time period (release date vs. current date). When you do that you can find out if the film is still relevant.

      Thanks – NTM

      Like

  7. 1. What insight did you gain from the history of special effects/disaster films (digital or otherwise)?
    I was intrigued by the use of miniature models to create large scenes in older films. For instance, the enormous gorilla in 1939’s version of King Kong was only 18 inches in height, but by using different perspectives and separate filming sessions, the filmmakers were able to create the massive, iconic monster that we know today. If you fast forward to present times, CGI rules the film industry. Developing a colossal gorilla is much more expensive now, but the product is truly magnificent. In 2017’s Kong: Skull Island, we were able to glimpse just how remarkably far special effects have come in the film industry.

    2. How has your understanding of science fiction changed after reading the material? If it hasn’t changed, what was reinforced?
    I don’t think I had ever made the connection between science fiction and its impact on social issues. The story on the first interracial kiss in Star Trek was very fascinating. Now, these things are not thought twice about by most people. Yet, this was in 1968, in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement and rampant alienation against African-Americans in the United States. But, because this was a fictional, futuristic story taking place across the galaxy, it managed to strike a balance by making a statement without being too forceful. In more recent times, I think we have seen other issues brought to light in science fiction narratives, such as religion and sexual orientation. It all depends on the hot-button topic of the time period. Science fiction stories are some of the most influential mediums that start conversations on topics of contention.

    3. As you explored the reading “Why Superheroes Matter” – defend or dispute those thoughts from your standpoint.
    Personally, I agreed wholeheartedly with many of the statements made by Nicholas Conley. Also, interestingly enough, I think Spider-Man most appeals to me during my current situation in life, much like Conley always felt this connection. However, it was not until recently that I experienced this. Growing up, I saw two different portrayals of the Spider-Man character, first by Toby Maguire in his trilogy, and then the two films with Andrew Garfield. But, I could not quite empathize with them, for a couple of reasons. First of all, they were playing high school characters, while I was watching these films in elementary and middle school. Secondly, these actors were both well past high school age in real life, so this portrayal did not feel authentic. I had trouble connecting based on these differences. Yet, in looking to Tom Holland’s more recent iteration of the character, I have directly felt an emotional link with Peter Parker/Spider-Man. When Holland was initially cast, he was only 19 years old, and could pass for much younger. Currently at 22 years of age, he is still playing a high schooler, but the age gap is not nearly as wide as we had with Maguire and Garfield’s depiction of the character. Coupled with the fact that Holland naturally appears younger than his age, I believe that this is the best version of Spider-Man that we have seen thus far. I have also watched Tom Holland’s films at nearly the same age of his Spider-Man character. I have been able to directly identify with his struggles as a teenager, which has ensured the success of this representation of Spider-Man, at least in my eyes.

    4. While exploring “Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV & Beyond” you should notice some differences and similarities. What similarities do you feel are the most relevant when reviewing films (regardless of the medium of distribution)? Why?
    The essentials that are prominent regardless of the medium include plot synopsis (no spoilers), directors and producers, key cast members, intended audience members and the MPAA rating, and your personal view of the film’s success, giving support for your opinions. I think that more than anything, the absolute necessities are plot synopsis and your assessment of the film. Most readers, listeners, or viewers would be able to judge whether or not this is a film they would like to see solely based on these elements. On the other hand, if you only name-dropped some cast and crew members and touched on the MPAA rating, that does not give nearly enough information to the audience. In order to formulate a more complete media review, including all of these components is preferred, but when it comes down to it, nothing is more important than the story of the film and your thoughts on its success or failure.

    – Thomas Manning

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Exploring King Kong (SFX) is pretty amazing when you look at the original model vs. the CGI (motion capture). We’ve come a long ways, but both are impressive in their own ways.

      Social impact, cultural issues, politics & religion are all the fodder for commentary for Sci-fi. It has been for a very long time, and it still is. Even going back to Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein (science vs. God), sci-fi has always asked deep questions.

      Really great thoughts and perspectives in relation to the newest Spiderman. It makes sense that this version appeals to you more (because you’re the peer of the character).

      Thomas keep all the thoughts in mind in relation to the reviews (TV, print, radio, blogging). Keep searching for balance. Good job.

      Like

  8. noeltmanning says:

    Luke – Response post:

    1. What insight did you gain from the history of special effects/disaster films (digital or otherwise)?
    – Visual effects and the progress that has been made over time is impressive to say the least. Visual effects have made astounding advancements over the years and most people know that, but to actually see each movie from the 40’s to present that won awards for VFX is incredible. At first glance it is easy to see these advancements. However, knowing what it took to make these advancements in visual effects obvious and convincing to the viewer is pretty cool. One of the more interesting things that I learned was the ability to capture the movement of people’s faces and more importantly their eyes, and project that into a virtual image. Using small cameras, visual effects can capture each intricate facial movement of an actor in order to make it look as realistic as possible. Lastly, I found in interesting to learn why virtual reality isn’t used as much as it could be. The cost is one of the more obvious reasons, but the ability to capture light and movement realistically and project that in a 360-degree view is not only costly, but time consuming and difficult. Advancements are being made to capture the best virtual reality images, but its understandable as to why it isn’t used more than CGI.

    2. How has your understanding of science fiction changed after reading the material? If it hasn’t changed, what was reinforced?
    – My understanding of science fiction has not changed in any way after reading the material. I was pretty aware of what types of ideas were created and why. However, I was reminded of the ability of science fiction to challenge a social norm. I found it comforting to learn about the first interracial kiss and the racial issues that it was able to press. It reinforced my understanding of what science fiction can actually challenge in society and the possible impact it can have.

    3. As you explored the reading “Why Superheroes Matter” – defend or dispute those thoughts from your standpoint.
    – After having read “Why Superheroes Matter”, the idea that superheroes are inspiring and thought provoking is something I agree with entirely for a few reasons. Regardless of someone liking superhero movies or not, it is easy to see the parallel between realistic people, their personalities, struggles, the release that they have to make them who they are, and the struggles and powers of a superhero’s life. The parallel between real life and fiction is not too far off from people in real life and more importantly the person that you are. Even if you hate superheroes and their respective characters there is a lesson that can be learned from them all. We aren’t perfect, we all have problems, but we all have the power to change ourselves, and those around us. Superheroes are just an exaggerated way of projecting that message if you chose accept that message. Just like Batman, Iron Man, Spider-Man, and all the other heroes. They are simple people outside of their super powered lives. They live complex lives with struggles and conflict. However, they all possess something to change themselves and others. Just like people in real life we all have difficulties, but we also have something special in us all that can change us personally, and the people around us. It’s a great message to draw from superheroes. One that doesn’t have to be drawn from only super hero fans.

    4. While exploring “Reviewing for Print, Radio, TV & Beyond” you should notice some differences and similarities. What similarities do you feel are the most relevant when reviewing films (regardless of the medium of distribution)? Why?
    – The similarities between reviewing for print, radio, TV, and other forms of distribution that I found most relevant are structure, preparation, creativity, and knowing your audience. I think it is pretty straight forward as to why these are the most important aspects of reviews, because they all feed into each other. A review must be structured, it needs to have clarity, brevity, and get to the point in order to deliver a message without too much fluff that veers the audience away. Preparation can make for a structured review. Knowing your data, talking points, and important aspects of a film will make structuring a film review easier and more enjoyable to be an audience to. Creativity is an important similarity among these mediums because it makes the overall review that much more enjoyable. The most prepared and structured review can be boring to read without some sort of creativity like humor or simply showing enjoyment in what you’re reviewing. Lastly, a reviewer must know his/her audience to make the best review possible. All of the aforementioned similarities in reviewing films are important without a doubt, but if none of it caters to the audience most likely to see the review then it won’t be nearly as impactful or enjoyable.

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    1. noeltmanning says:

      Luke – Motion capture (and environment capture) will continue to advance and change our SFX landscape for film, video games and virtual.

      Excellent quote to use Luke for the Superheroes: “We aren’t perfect, we all have problems, but we all have the power to change ourselves, and those around us. ”

      Creativity, clarity, and knowing your material + understanding “how” to share your thoughts can translate across reviewing platforms.

      Thanks Luke -NTMII

      Like

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