(Ch.5) Response Post and Semester Project Intro Section; due Oct. 2

Semester Project Notes: Due October 3 (11:59 pm)- Turn in draft (for grading) of the introduction section for your semester project and email it to ntmanning@gardner-webb.edu for a response-post grade.

 View one (1) of your semester project films by September 30  (and make detailed notes).

Due October 2 (noon) – Read and engage in all materials for chapter 5 and listen to at least one of the interviews with a featured film composer in this chapter. Address the following:

  1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life?
  2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson?
  3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

4. Address the following questions after listening to a composer interview and respond at the bottom of this post:

A. Address which interview you listened to.

B. Name at least 2 films of the composer.

C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

The above interview is with composer Ryan Amon from the film Elysium

The above interview is with Oscar-winner Steven Price. Price has been connected to greats like Trevor Jones and Hans Zimmer, and with work on such films as “Lord of the Rings” and “Batman Begins.” He was also involved in original music for “Baby Driver” and “American Assassin.”

Film composer Mark McKenzie (above) has worked with the likes of Sir Paul McCartney, John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith and Danny Elfman. His compositions have been featured at the Olympics and the Oscars. His influences have been heard on Dances with Wolves, Good Will Hunting, Sleepless in Seattle and more. On this episode of Cinemascene, McKenzie talks with Noel T. Manning II about his life, his passion for music and his film “The Ultimate Life.”

John Ottman (above) is editor and composer for several X-Men films and the Freddy Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody.

The first 15 minutes of the above interview is with Junkie XL, composer for Mad Max: Fury Road and Justice League

Long-time film composer Mark Isham (above) shares his view of music and cinema.

**Listen to one of these and share your thoughts below.**

 

18 Comments Add yours

  1. Celia García Martín says:

    1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life?

    Jay Forry is a great example of courage and overcoming. His attitude towards life along with the support that he received from his family, friends and coworkers put many prejudices aside to prove that he could not only be a film critic, but also a very special one. His blindness, instead of being an impediment as many of us would think, has become his best ally to provide unique film reviews. The big role of visual components in films often distract our attention from other details, such as how sound and silence are used throughout a movie to create specific effects, and there is Jay to make us aware of how much we miss while enjoying a movie. Listening to a film, as Jay does, has sometimes the advantage of getting rid of too many superficial aspects that do not add content to the film and rather focus on the actual plot of the story. If the sound effects and the dialogues work well in a film, one could still enjoy it and figure out what it is happening without necessarily having to see it.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson?

    These three components add meaning to the movie and are carefully studied to match with the story of the film. As for the music elements, there are soundtracks in the history of cinema that have become so iconic that it would be difficult to imagine certain stories or certain characters without their own personal soundtracks accompanying them. Such is the case of Darth Vader and the music that announces him; Indiana Jones with a soundtrack that anyone could still recognize nowadays; or Jaws with its tense, violent soundtrack that prepared the spectator for what was going to happen. Other movies, although not having a song attached to a character, use music to produce certain reactions in the viewer. A great example in this regard is the Pixar movie “Up”. For me this is a clear example of a film that would have not been the same without its soundtrack. The melody at the beginning of the movie is essentially the same, but its changes in rhythm, speed and certain notes make the audience interpret each scene in a completely different way. Music alone is able in this case of transmitting feelings of nostalgia, happiness, hope or sadness. Music plays an essential role in the way we interpret films. Otherwise, who could have imagined that the corridor scene in “The Shining” could almost look bucolic just by changing its music?

    3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

    One of my favorite films is “Goodbye Lenin”, a story narrating the transition of Germany after the fall of the Berlin wall. This is a film full of feelings of nostalgia, of leaving the past behind and having to adapt to changes faster than one would like. Its soundtrack, composed almost entirely by Yann Tiersen, a French musician and composer, gets not only to transmit those exact feelings, but to increase them making the film much more meaningful. Returning to an example mentioned before, I consider the soundtrack of “Up” by Michael Giacchino to be a masterpiece. The first minutes of the film tell one of the most beautiful love stories that I have ever seen in cinema being music the only connector element between the different scenes. It is no surprise that Giacchino was awarded in several occasions for this wonderful soundtrack.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to a composer interview and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    B. Name at least 2 films of the composer.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    I listened to Steven Price’s interview, in charge of soundtracks of movies like “Gravity”, as well as participating in part of the music for two of the “Lord of the Rings” films: “The Two Towers” and “The Return of the King”. He explains that his formation as a composer probably started when he was a kid when he was already drawn to music and its potential to tell stories. One interesting aspect that he highlights is that a music composer for films must not only be a great musician, but also flexible in order to adapt their music styles to the story of the movie. He mentions the example of Hans Zimmer, who is able to create masterpieces and knows how to channel them into specific stories to make his music not only wonderful but also meaningful. A collaborative work between composer and director is also crucial to create a perfect music-film symbiosis. He explains how that collaboration worked perfectly with the Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón with whom he has already worked in several occasions (apart from “Gravity” they also worked together in the Netflix film “Roma”). Thus, soundtrack composing is not only a matter of music itself, but to make music agree with the story that the film is telling.

    Celia García Martín

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks for your thoughts on Jay. Sometimes we do get caught up in the CGI distractions and miss out go the heart of the story. Listening and engaging in the dialogue, music and sound can take us to different and unique places (if we allow).m

      Great thoughts and feedback on Up, The Shining, Darth Vadar & Indie.

      I am looking forward to exploring more from Yann Tiersen, I remember his work on Amélie, which was amazing, but I haven’t really listened to much of his work beyond that.

      Steven Price was a joy to interview. His approach to composing also merges into sound design (and sound effects) as well especially if you look at Gravity. Thanks Celia

      Like

  2. 1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life?

    I think Jay is incredible! I also thought Jay’s interview with Jimmy Kimmel was great! Avatar is one of the most visually creative and beautiful films of this time! Until today I have never considered trying to imagine what Pandora would look like with just using dialogue, sound effects, and ambient sound to imagine it. When Avatar came up during Jay’s interview with Kimmel, Jay said that he didn’t like Avatar because the plot was too much like a western. I have to admit that I was too distracted by the great graphics to see the subpar plot. Reviewing a film based only on the sound is not that much different from listening to an audiobook. Except that an audiobook has the additional audio description to aid the listeners’ experience. After learning about Jay I think it’s incredible what he has overcome.

    2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson?

    I find the process of creating Foley sound very interesting. I have worked on a film set before and the crew used a boom mike to capture dialogue and ambient sound. I didn’t think much of how sounds are recorded in post-production until I saw a DVD special feature on how the sounds of Avatar were made. I find it really cool that in post-production, someone can create the sound of popcorn popping with bubble wrap.

    3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

    A few types of musicals that I really enjoy include Sound of Music, La La Land, Les Miserable and Mamma Mia. All of which are True Form Musicals. I have never considered a film like Guardians of the Galaxy or Back to the Future to be musicals. I also really enjoy films that have the soundtrack interacting with the actual characters but don’t have the characters singing every single word. On the other hand, I thoroughly enjoy singing songs like Dancing Queen and
    Climb Every Mountain. I like True Form since I feel like it gives actors another way to express themselves and therefore giving potentially a better performance.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to a composer interview and respond at the bottom of this post:

    A. Address which interview you listened to.

    I chose to listen to the Ryan Amon interview since I really enjoyed Elysium, as well as District 9.

    B. Name at least 2 films of the composer.

    During the interview, Ryan Amon talked about Elysium being his major film composing debut. Before he composed Elysium, he was a movie trailer composer, he had worked on songs that were included in Seven Pounds, Watchdog, and some of the recent Marvel film trailers.

    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    What was interesting about Amon’s story of how he started composing Elysium was how it was similar to how Intersteller’s score was created. I remember learning last semester that when Christopher Nolan was first telling Hans Zimmer about the film that Nolan just said it was about a father-daughter relationship. I find this sort of approach interesting since it helps a composer focus on the deeper meaning of the story as opposed to creating large musical sounds that don’t always compliment the meaning of the story.
    I think it’s interesting how Amon chose to follow the theme of the movie with his score. The world of Elysium didn’t have any countries so Amon didn’t compose with any music that would sound like it was from any current country. I appreciate how Amon used the technique of new sounding music in his Elysium score.

    -Sam Grove

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jay was spot on about the “Western” plot formula for Avatar … but WOW did it impress visually.

      Post production (in all aspects) has always fascinated me. To me, this is where the real magic happens in full.

      The beauty of trueform musicals is that it allows for a seamless transition in between story/dialogue/music.

      Composers who create soundtracks with characters, places and situational environments in mind provide as much to our appreciation of the film as anyone (even if we don’t realize it). Thanks Sam

      Like

  3. jalissa9 says:

    1. What I think of Jay Forry I think it’s amazing what he does. I feel what’s more amazing is when people with disabilities makes it a non-disability. People like him are an inspiration that you can do anything that you want to do. This makes me feel that I don’t have any excuses and that the word can’t shouldn’t be in my vocabulary. Hearing the interviews, he seems very humorous and also very cheerful. He pays attention to the storyline and not the image itself. “He even quotes that if the movie does not have a good storyline you don’t have a movie”- Jay Forry. Him being able to critique without viewing the image and pay close attention to the movie and realize the surroundings and if the script, the dialogue was overall well written is a gift beyond measures. It also makes me think that people that were blessed with eyesight should actually see what it’s like as an experiment. Take a blindfold and watch an entire movie that way and see if you can really focus on the detail and storyline and what the outcome may be.
    2. What interests me the most is how music can really take a toll on how you feel overall. Lyrics tell the story, but the sound sets the tone. It’s like for instances a scary movie is playing and no one is talking usually some loud, streaking or banging noises occur to scare you or warn you that something is going to pop out. You cannot play Taylor Swift in the background of a horror film. Also, the way it can tell what time zone and era you are in. music has been around for centuries and the genres are endless. If you are wanting a movie to feel like the 80s you got to research 80s music. I did not realize that even sound, music can make or break the movie just as much as a bad actor would.
    3. I am a fan of Marvel and Avengers so composers that tend to make the sounds and playlist for action films like those catch my interest. Alan Silvestri is a very popular composer and I like what he’s done with the avenger films.
    4. I listened to John Ottoman and 2 of films he talked about is X-men days of future of past and X-men apocalypse. I think it was fascinating how talks about the creating scores and that even his best work has not been shown. He mentions that the film Astro boy did not go well even though his score was amazing. Which also showed me movies are like recipes and if you miss a step then the recipe turns into a mess. You can have an amazing score, but the rest of the movie can fall short and leave the other parts out to dry. It’s like the saying if you lose we all lose. He also goes in detail for the film of X-men how he had extras and camera crew shoot from all different angles and also how creating the score is not just sitting on a computer and how he chose 70s music to set the tone of the time period they were going for. He used source instead of the score to intensify the feeling as well.

    -Jalissa Herrera

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Jalissa, With Jay’s approach it goes back to our earlier lessons … It starts with “Story.”

      Love your thought: “Can’t play Tayler Swift in a horror film.”

      We talked about evaluating films for strengths and weaknesses and giving the overall film a grade. His Astro Boy mention hits on that, when we review a film we should always note “where” a film succeeds and fails.

      Thanks -Noel

      Like

  4. drewpeden says:

    For this week, I will be diving into topics such as talking about a blind film critic, and then I will be talking about my experience listening to a famous film composer.

    After first hearing about Jay Forry, i was in disbelief until i actually watched his interviews and saw how special his talent actually is. You would never guess that someone who is blind would have the ability to go to a movie theatre, listen to movies, and write reviews on them based on what he heard. Blind for over 20 years now, Forry is a part of The Film Critic Association, and chooses movies every year to win awards. He can know sho much depth on a movie without ever seeing it. Forry takes a companion with him to his early screenings and has that person describe the things that he cant see. To Forry, the score of a film is what makes a film great. I personally think that his gift is amazing, and he is very well accomplished in his career without seeing a single film he has reviewed. He has such a keen mind and can visually put together a film based on the score and the sound affects he hears throughout the film. This is a true gift and Forry is truly remarkable.

    Sound and music to me, make or break a film. Yeah the action or drama and scenes are great, but what really draws me in when i watch a film is the sounds and music used. I love how music has the ability to amplify drama of a scene. Take Interstellar for example, this film is very long, and while some people think it is boring, i think the score used in the film add such a dramatic feeling and deeper meaning the the film than the common person would pick up on. If you take the music out of the film, then yes Interstellar may be a very boring film. I love how music can take any scene in any film and turn it into exactly what the producer wants. Music can intensify a scene with music just as much as it can calm down a scene. I am a huge fan of Hans Zimmer. Any film that he does the score for, i know i will love it, just based on my baggage for his work and how he portrays scenes in a film such Interstellar or Inception. 

    I took a look at the film composer John Ottman, and boy was i impressed by what he had to say. Ottman has worked on films such as X-Men: Days of Future Past which was a huge box office hit, as well as some films that did not do so great such as Astroboy. Not only did Ottman write the score for the X-Men film, but he also was the editor of the film, so this allowed him to create the score based on his own edits, so he was really able to make the film into whatever he wanted to or what he was told to. What i really found interesting in his interview was that he works better under pressure and when he knows he has a tight deadline, thats when he produces some of his best work. I think it is interesting on how he does the music for a film or for specific scenes based on the source rather than just getting it to fit into the score, and somehow, everything bends the ways he needs it to and the film and music and everything seem to blend together seamlessly. 

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Continue to explore the impact (and importance) of sound design and music. The more we review, them more important that will become for exploring importance (and the pieces of the film-making puzzle).

      Yeah, the fact that John Ottman handles both score & editing for films provides a benefit for the final product -he’s completely connected throughout the process (visually and from a music standpoint).

      Like

  5. 1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life?

    After reading the life of Jay Forry, his story and movie-going experience have really made a huge impact on me. For me, I’ve always loved watching movies with my own two eyes, and I’m truly grateful that I’ve been given that sense, but after watching the Jay Forry on Jimmy Kimmel and reading his life story, his point of reference of being a film critic is something I’m going to take some inspiration from. When he brought up the movie Avatar, a movie that I admire more than most, it was interesting to see his take on a movie that, for some, got distracted with its visuals and felt it lacked substance. While I disagree with that notion, I can see where he’s coming from. I also got a kick when he mentioned the movie Battlefield Earth, and even when a blind man doesn’t like that movie that should really tell you the true quality of that movie.

    2. 2. What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence, and music based on the lesson?

    I’ve always been a huge proponent when it comes to music/score for a movie because I truly and firmly believe that music, when placed right and executed right, can elevate a sequence to a whole other level. Music has always had an impact on me because it can convey so much emotion with a simple melody/beat. However, a recent example of how effectively silence and music were used at the same time was this years A Quiet Place. Sure, it had sequences of music, but the idea of the entire movie being dead silent and the sound effects of the wind, leaves falling etc., brought me into the environment and the atmosphere of the movie.

    3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?
    I love me some Hans Zimmer and John Williams, but if I were to pick other film composers I’d have to go with Alan Silvestri and John Powell. There’s just something classical and epic in scale that their music presents itself.

    4. A) Address which interview you listened to.
    I listened to the interview with Junkie XL (Tom).

    B) Name at least 2 films of the composer.
    Junkie XL is the composer for Deadpool and Mad Max: Fury Road Justice (with Hans Zimmer).

    C) What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    One thing I was fascinated with this interview was when Junkie XL talked about how much time he had to “pull off” his music. He did the score for 3:00 Rise of an Empire and it took him about 5-6 weeks and for Mad Max: Fury Road he had about 18 months. With Mad Max, he had a lot more time to make any creative changes, but with 300 he wasn’t given much time and it’s almost as if he was just thrown into the mix.

    When he got into composing the score for Mad Max: Fury Road it was really interesting to hear how get got the gig, first meeting George Miller (the director of the movie) and trying to come up with music that fit the movie. He wanted to create a score that almost felt like “chase music” with a mix of hard rock and an operatic theme to it as well.

    -Zane Gray

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Battlefied Earth … 🙂 Yeah, that was funny.

      Great point with ‘A Quiet PLace” – I completely agree. What a solid film from a sound design standpoint (and other levels as well).

      I’ve been amazed by the film scoring career and the ebbs and flows of the time involved for creation. Junkie XL has produced some really interesting work under tight deadlines, and also with long long amounts to time. Some would rather have the quick turnarounds so they can move to something else.

      Like

  6. Thomas Manning says:

    1. What are your thoughts on the Blind Film Critic Jay Forry after exploring his interviews & life?

    I was blown away by Forry’s ability to intricately analyze a film without the sense of sight, which is seemingly the most significant sense of film analysis. Yet, Forry shows us that this is not the case at all. Originally, his career as a film critic started out as a bit of a joke, and now he’s a national treasure. Some of his vivid descriptions based on sound alone were as effective as any descriptions I’ve heard from people who have actually seen the movie visually. When you are forced to rely solely on sound to experience a film, you pick up on extra details that other audience members might not notice. However, I did find it interesting that Avatar did not have a huge impact on him. Visually, Avatar might be one of the greatest films of all time. Unfortunately, Forry was not able to witness this due to his blindness. Being a blind film critic is not without its obstacles, but it is certainly one of the most intriguing stories I’ve ever heard in the film industry.

    2.
    What is most fascinating to you about the use of sound, silence and music based on the lesson?

    It was interesting to read about how incredibly significant sound design (including silence) is to a film, not just the music. On a conscious level, I think we as the audience mostly walk away remembering the emotional chords struck in us by the score itself. The music is definitely the most prominent aspect of sound design. But, when it really comes down to it, often times background noise and silence play just as crucial a role as any musical score. Although I am personally not a huge fan of horror films, I am familiar enough with them to know how terrifying creaky floors and strange tapping sounds can be in an old, spooky house. This is no accident. The sound designers know exactly what they are doing in these situations. Another example, which had a clip included in this section, is the film Castaway with Tom Hanks. For the entire time that he was trapped on the island, there was no music. All we heard were the natural sounds from the deserted landscape. This created an authentic feeling of isolation, drawing the audience in and making them feel like they were in the same shoes as Hanks’ character.

    3. What type of musical soundtracks (or composers) are you usually drawn to? Why?

    Some of my favorite composers include John Williams, Michael Giacchino, Howard Shore, and Hanz Zimmer. These are huge names in the industries of science fiction, fantasy, and action and adventure, which are some of my favorite genres of film. Initially, I am drawn to films like Star Wars (Williams) or The Lord of the Rings (Shore) for their storylines, but many times the scores and sound design are just as impactful as any other cinematic element. Each of these composers are masters at creating emotional connections with the audience. They are experts in music theory, and specifically study how to build these psychological bridges. Whenever I hear musical pieces from these films, I am able to mentally envision the scenes from the films with which they align, and feel those same emotions that I would experience from actually watching them. This is how you know that a composer has truly done their job.

    4. Address the following questions after listening to a composer interview and respond at the bottom of this post:
    A. Address which interview you listened to.
    B. Name at least 2 films of the composer.
    C. What did you learn about film composing from this individual, or what fascinated you about the filmmaker’s approach to composing (either in general or for a specific film)?

    I listened to the interview with John Ottman, composer of films such as X Men: Days of Future Past and The Usual Suspects. It was fascinating to hear him speak about the sheer amount of time consumed by this job. He must plan out every minute of his day and take into account various other obligations if he wants to get his work done as a composer. This can be a slippery slope to navigate, but Ottman has slowly mastered this art throughout his career. Another skill of Ottman’s that really impressed me was his editing abilities. In X Men: Days of Future Past, he was in charge of both editing and scoring the film. He mentioned a certain scene from the film with the superhero Quicksilver who can move at superhuman speed. In this particular moment, Quicksilver showcases his powers, moving at incredible speeds while everything else occurs in slow motion. Jim Croce’s song from 1973, “Time in a Bottle,” played during this scene, a perfect metaphor for Quicksilver’s action in this scene. It aligned even more perfectly with the time period of this film, which took place in the 1970s. Ottman’s top-notch editing skills and song selection were prominently showcased in this instance.

    – Thomas Manning

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Sometimes the jokes we find ourselves in become the very things that provide years of opportunity. Jay has found a way to reach beyond his blindness and explore the film’s from his mind’s eye -I love that.

      I agree, that most of us remember the score, or the music and its impact. We don’t really consider the sound design. effects and the impact of silence. The Castaway film (especially act two) still blows me away.

      Yeah Ottman also serves as the music supervisor and not just composer. Music Supervisors select the supplemental music (Like “Time in a Bottle”), and Ottman approaches these songs with pure purpose as well.

      Thanks Thomas

      Like

  7. Jay Forry was an absolutely sensational guy who has really brought a negative situation to a positive light. I think he’s giving hope to the blind and also those with similar disabilities. His story of becoming a movie critic through his college newspaper was very entertaining. The happenstance of a joke turning into a career almost deserves a movie itself!

    The most fascinating thing for me throughout this chapter was noting sounds in movies, that don’t have naturally occurring sounds. Like the light sabers being tv static, or the t-rex roar being a combination of tigers and alligators while it’s breathing is a whale’s blowhole. I think that’s fascinating for two reasons. One being, how artist, I guess the foley designer or the director, already knows exactly how they WANT it to sound, it’s just a matter of gathering up the sounds that do happen in real life to do so. Secondly, it’s interesting how our brains can deceive us and assign noises deemed to be correct because the movie tells us so. I think that says a lot about just how wonderful our brains are and how much fun those jobs can be.

    I’m normally drawn to ambient soundtracks. Just today I listened to the entire fellowship of the ring soundtrack TWICE because it was music that I could do homework too. Otherwise, I like happy-go-lucky movies that have songs I can sing along to.

    I listened to Mark Ishams phone interview. He was a composer for many many movies, two of them being 42 and the accountant. From what I learned about him through the interview, he takes a very philosophical take on creating scores, which I can totally get behind. Isham made a good point that it’s not about matching genres of music to genres of film but more so seeing what emotions does the director aim for the viewers to have. He wisely mentioned how, “The genre of film music is to rise above.” And he’s exactly right, it’s to heighten as much sensation as possible from the viewer to make the movie just plain better. It shocked me when he said that for the music for 42 he really just picked up pen and paper and started writing. First off, I respect anyone that can handwrite music. Secondly, I respect him for taking a humble approach to the process despite the equipment he said he had.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Creating sound FX is pretty interesting. When the sounds and the visuals combine, it tricks our brains into thinking :that’s how it’s supposed to sound”.

      As w dive deeper into the semester, continue to explore the impact of music and sound design.

      Like

  8. noeltmanning says:

    Luke Gazak Response Post: Here are my responses to the chapter 5 post.

    1.) 1.) After exploring Jay Forray’s interviews and life story, there are many things that came to mind that were compelling and noteworthy in the perspective of my own life as well as aspects of a film. The most interesting part of Jay’s personal life to me was his ability to be resilient and find a way to make his life continue for the better regardless of his sight being taken from him. When watching his interviews, I could just tell the joy he found in his life from film and it shows that no matter the circumstances you can be happy if not happier than others and furthermore, successful or more successful. It brings to my attention that there is always a way and I find joy myself seeing that in Jay’s life and interviews. Aside from the life lessons and connections to Jay’s. I found it interesting the importance of story and dialogue that Jay puts into the film criticism industry. Special effects and other sight-oriented aspects of film are so prominent today that it is refreshing to see such an emphasis on the story and dialogue. To me, it shows the skill and use of storytelling and verbally painting a picture for the audience so well that they are compelled to not watch, but listen, and create their own special effects. Jay and his film reviews are the epitomai of that and it is something that every movie could attempt to perfect for a better all-around film blind, or not.

    2.) The things that I found most fascinating about sound silence and music was the focus on expressing emotion in music, and the fact that most sounds are recreated in films. To start with, I love music and I understand its ability to draw emotions from people. But the importance of a cohesion between the scene and the music I feel is underrated. Whenever I see a movie with a good soundtrack I can just tell. Sometimes it can give me goosebumps and sometimes it can get me hyped up, but it has to be done with the right taste. One good example I can think of is the music played in Star Wars when Darth Vader is entering. It’s one of those cinema music sounds that just strikes home and the feared power of Darth Vader is perfectly represented. In terms of the recreation of sounds in movies, I am astounded by the lengths that are gone through to get certain sounds and the things that they come from. To seamlessly compare the sounds created to what they are trying to project is amazing. Before I would never have guessed that sounds in certain movies were recreated especially the amount that had to be done. To think of a sound that sounds like something else sounds mind-bendingly tedious but when done right the viewer doesn’t even know. It just amazes the work that is done and the amount of thought put into just making a movie especially in terms of sound, and music.

    3.) The type of musical soundtracks that I am usually drawn to are ones that are played by instruments and without vocals. I enjoy movies that have lyrics and newer music, and sometimes that works for a particular movie. However, the movies that stand out to me and their soundtracks are the ones that embrace music in its purest form without lyrics, and really evoke emotion and feeling of the scene from instrumental sound alone. Star Wars was a great film soundtrack for me because the music from it was perfect for the scenes it was paired with yet still brought about emotion and complimented each scene.

    4.) The interview that I listened to was with Steven Price and I was happy to hear that he was part of the films Baby Driver and Fury. Two drastically different movies in their music yet they both captured the movies perfectly. It was fascinating to me how Steven Price and his upbringing to composing for films came about. Two big parts of Steven’s job I can safely assume are music and story. I think that Steven and his success as a filmmaker are partly due to his mentioned love for writing stories, and his degree and skill in music. I find it interesting how Steven chose not to get into music or story writing alone but instead combined the two interests of his to one and compose music for stories in film.

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      I’ve know Jay a very long time, and continue to be fascinated by him and his approach to reviewing films. For those with sight, it’s hard to really imagine what we’re missing … or are we?

      Music, silence and sound designs are all connected and if done well, all are truly seamlessly married within the film. Each of these three can impact emotions.

      Steven was really impressive on many levels. His approach to music and storytelling also reaches over into “Sound design” as he did with the Oscar Winning work he did on “Gravity.”

      Like

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